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I have one vector container and I would like to make a subtraction operation on the values of its content using the current iterator against the previous iterator, any help will be much appreciated

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Just curious, why not just use [] operator and do operations based on the index ? –  Mahesh Jun 25 '13 at 21:56
1  
@Mahesh, pretend it's a map or set instead of a vector. The question is a good one. –  Mark Ransom Jun 25 '13 at 21:58

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

std::vector's iterator is a RandomAccessIterator, so you can perform integer arithmetic on it. Thus, you don't need a separate "current" and "previous" pointer, as long as you start your iteration from begin() + 1:

vector<Foo> myVec = ...;
if(myVec.size() > 1) { 
    for(vector<Foo>::iterator iter = myVec.begin()+1; iter != myVec.end(); iter++) {
        Foo current = *iter;
        Foo previous = *(iter - 1);
        Foo subtraction = current - previous;
        ...
    }
}

Of course, you can't subtract the current and previous element if there are fewer than two elements in your vector. The size check might be redundant if you know your input vector will always have at least two elements, but I included it just to be safe.

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If myVec.begin() == myVec.end() you have undefined behaviour –  Nicola Musatti Jun 26 '13 at 10:44
    
Good point. I guess I assumed the OP's vector would always be non-empty because he wanted to subtract the current item from the previous item, but I can fix it to make sure it doesn't break on empty vectors. –  Edward Jun 26 '13 at 21:56
vector<MyClass>::iterator itPrevious = my_vec.begin();
vector<MyClass>::iterator itCurrent = itPrevious;
if (itCurrent != my_vec.end())
{
    for (++itCurrent;  itCurrent != my_vec.end();  ++itCurrent)
    {
        // do something with itPrevious and itCurrent
        itPrevious = itCurrent;
    }
}
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did you mean itCurrent in for (itCurrent;? –  TooTone Jun 25 '13 at 22:03
    
@TooTone, I was unsure what to put in the first part of the for loop since it doesn't really require anything in this case. I thought it would look too odd leaving it blank so I just threw in a do-nothing clause. –  Mark Ransom Jun 25 '13 at 22:05
    
I thought you could put the ++itCurrent in there and then have the for as the if body? –  TooTone Jun 25 '13 at 22:07
    
@TooTone, now I understand. That's a good suggestion, I'll make that change. –  Mark Ransom Jun 25 '13 at 22:09
    
Is there any reason you need to keep separate "current" and "previous" iterators when iterator arithmetic can get a pointer to the previous value on the spot? –  Edward Jun 26 '13 at 0:27

Given you asked for a vector, you can use iterator arithmetic:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    std::vector<int> v{ 1, 2, 3, 4 };
    for ( auto i = v.begin(); i != v.end(); ++i ) {
        if ( i != v.begin() )
            *i = *i - *(i-1);
    }
    for ( auto i : v )
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
}
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if(v.size() < 2)
   return;
auto curr = v.begin();
auto next = curr;
++next;
do
{
  whatever(*next - *curr );
  curr = next++;
} while( next != v.end() )
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An alternative:

for (auto previous = v.begin(), current = previous + 1, end = v.end();
    previous != end && current != end;
    ++previous, ++current)
{
    std::cout << *current << " - " << *previous << " = " << *current - *previous << std::endl;
}
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Fails when previous == end. –  Mark Ransom Jun 26 '13 at 0:29
    
@MarkRansom: Thanks. Fixed. –  Johnsyweb Jun 26 '13 at 0:43

There are namely three more-or-less elegant ways to solve your problem.

Define a new functor

And use it in a for_each iteration

template<class T>
struct substractor {
    substractor() : last(nullptr) {}
    void operator()(T& item) const
    {
        if(last != nullptr)
            *last -= item;
        last = &item;
    }
    mutable T* last;
};
...
vector<int> v = {3, 2, 1};
for_each(v.begin(), v.end(), substractor<int>());

Define a new algorithm

Some kind of pair in-place transform here

template<typename It, typename Op>
void pair_transform(It begin, It end, Op op){
    while(begin != end)
    {
        It next = std::next(begin);
        if(next == end) break;
        *begin = op(*begin, *next);
        ++begin;
    }
}
...
vector<int> w = {3, 2, 1};
pair_transform(w.begin(), w.end(), std::minus<int>());

Keep it standard, use transform

IMHO the best one :) Concise, standard, nowhere else to look in order to understand this code.

vector<int> z = {3, 2, 1};
std::transform(z.begin(), z.end() - 1, z.begin() + 1, z.begin(), 
    std::minus<int>());
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