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I have a list, with each element being a character vector, of differing lengths I would like to bind the data as rows, so that the column names 'line up' and if there is extra data then create column and if there is missing data then create NAs

Below is a mock example of the data I am working with

x <- list()
x[[1]] <- letters[seq(2,20,by=2)]
names(x[[1]]) <- LETTERS[c(1:length(x[[1]]))]
x[[2]] <- letters[seq(3,20, by=3)]
names(x[[2]]) <- LETTERS[seq(3,20, by=3)]
x[[3]] <- letters[seq(4,20, by=4)]
names(x[[3]]) <- LETTERS[seq(4,20, by=4)]

The below line would normally be what I would do if I was sure that the format for each element was the same...

do.call(rbind,x)

I was hoping that someone had come up with a nice little solution that matches up the column names and fills in blanks with NAs whilst adding new columns if in the binding process new columns are found...

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3  
plyr:::rbind.fill: rbinds a list of data frames filling missing columns with NA. –  Roman Luštrik Jun 25 '13 at 22:21
    
plyr:::rbind.fill(lapply(x,function(y){as.data.frame(t(y))})) converts all the characters into factors...anyway to get rid of that? –  h.l.m Jun 25 '13 at 22:29
    
Do it post festum. Transposing your variable will inadvertently change it to a matrix. Once it coerces it back to a data.frame, characters get coded to factors. –  Roman Luštrik Jun 25 '13 at 22:31
    
actually got it... rbind.fill(lapply(x,function(y){as.data.frame(t(y),stringsAsFactors=FALSE)})) –  h.l.m Jun 25 '13 at 22:31
    
@h.l.m, that'll be terribly inefficient as you call for as.data.frame on each of your list element. I don't think this is the "best/fastest" solution. –  Arun Jun 25 '13 at 22:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

rbind.fill is an awesome function that does really well on list of data.frames. But IMHO, for this case, it could be done much faster when the list contains only (named) vectors.

The rbind.fill way

require(plyr)
rbind.fill(lapply(x,function(y){as.data.frame(t(y),stringsAsFactors=FALSE)}))

A more straightforward way (and efficient for this scenario at least):

rbind.named.fill <- function(x) {
    nam <- sapply(x, names)
    unam <- unique(unlist(nam))
    len <- sapply(x, length)
    out <- vector("list", length(len))
    for (i in seq_along(len)) {
        out[[i]] <- unname(x[[i]])[match(unam, nam[[i]])]
    }
    setNames(as.data.frame(do.call(rbind, out), stringsAsFactors=FALSE), unam)
}

Basically, we get total unique names to form the columns of the final data.frame. Then, we create a list with length = input and just fill the rest of the values with NA. This is probably the "trickiest" part as we've to match the names while filling NA. And then, we set names once finally to the columns (which can be set by reference using setnames from data.table package as well if need be).


Now to some benchmarking:

Data:

# generate some huge random data:
set.seed(45)
sample.fun <- function() {
    nam <- sample(LETTERS, sample(5:15))
    val <- sample(letters, length(nam))
    setNames(val, nam)  
}
ll <- replicate(1e4, sample.fun())

Functions:

# plyr's rbind.fill version:
rbind.fill.plyr <- function(x) {
    rbind.fill(lapply(x,function(y){as.data.frame(t(y),stringsAsFactors=FALSE)}))
}

rbind.named.fill <- function(x) {
    nam <- sapply(x, names)
    unam <- unique(unlist(nam))
    len <- sapply(x, length)
    out <- vector("list", length(len))
    for (i in seq_along(len)) {
        out[[i]] <- unname(x[[i]])[match(unam, nam[[i]])]
    }
    setNames(as.data.frame(do.call(rbind, out), stringsAsFactors=FALSE), unam)
}

Update (added GSee's function as well):

foo <- function (...) 
{
  dargs <- list(...)
  all.names <- unique(names(unlist(dargs)))
  out <- do.call(rbind, lapply(dargs, `[`, all.names))
  colnames(out) <- all.names
  as.data.frame(out, stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
}

Benchmarking:

require(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(t1 <- rbind.named.fill(ll), 
               t2 <- rbind.fill.plyr(ll), 
               t3 <- do.call(foo, ll), times=10)
identical(t1, t2) # TRUE
identical(t1, t3) # TRUE

Unit: milliseconds
                       expr        min         lq     median         uq        max neval
 t1 <- rbind.named.fill(ll)   243.0754   258.4653   307.2575   359.4332   385.6287    10
  t2 <- rbind.fill.plyr(ll) 16808.3334 17139.3068 17648.1882 17890.9384 18220.2534    10
     t3 <- do.call(foo, ll)   188.5139   204.2514   229.0074   339.6309   359.4995    10
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1  
+1 for the benchmarks. If you removed the argument checking (i.e. the if statements with vapply's), I think mine might even come out a little bit ahead. (but they're pretty close in speed; the argument checking might be worth it) –  GSee Jun 26 '13 at 0:12
1  
@GSee, fair point. I was going to change that today. Now I did it. And yes indeed, it's faster. I like yours in terms, in any case, of code compactness and the idea. –  Arun Jun 26 '13 at 6:13

If you want the result to be a matrix...

I recently wrote this function for a co-worker that wanted to rbind vectors into a matrix.

foo <- function (...) 
{
  dargs <- list(...)
  if (!all(vapply(dargs, is.vector, TRUE))) 
      stop("all inputs must be vectors")
  if (!all(vapply(dargs, function(x) !is.null(names(x)), TRUE))) 
      stop("all input vectors must be named.")
  all.names <- unique(names(unlist(dargs)))
  out <- do.call(rbind, lapply(dargs, `[`, all.names))
  colnames(out) <- all.names
  out
}

R > do.call(foo, x)
     A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   L   O   R   P   T  
[1,] "b" "d" "f" "h" "j" "l" "n" "p" "r" "t" NA  NA  NA  NA  NA 
[2,] NA  NA  "c" NA  NA  "f" NA  NA  "i" NA  "l" "o" "r" NA  NA 
[3,] NA  NA  NA  "d" NA  NA  NA  "h" NA  NA  "l" NA  NA  "p" "t"
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