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I have a problem with the following Python/Django code in a multiprocess environment. It tries to update an InnoDB table as if it were a queue, popping the top value. It works fine until the load reaches a certain level and multiple processes are in this code at the same time. A deadlock occurs when one process holds the table for delete, and another process tries to update the table.

Something I previously didn't know about InnoDB is that the index is separate from the table, so one process can have a lock the table and be waiting for a lock on the index, and another process can have the opposite, creating the deadlock. This seems to be happening with the UPDATE/DELETE deadlock in the code below.

In a nutshell the code starts by updating a single row (LIMIT 1) in the table, preventing any other process from updating the same row. It then selects that row to retrieve the other contents, performs some work, and then deletes that row from the table.

@classmethod
@transaction.commit_manually
def pop(cls, unique_id):
    """Retrieves the next item and removes it from the queue."""
    transaction.commit()    # This has the side effect of clearing the object cache

    if cls.objects.all().filter(unique_id__isnull=True).count() == 0:  return None

    sql = "UPDATE queue SET unique_id=%d" % unique_id
    sql += " WHERE unique_id IS NULL"
    sql += " ORDER BY id LIMIT 1"
    cursor = connection.cursor()
    try:
        cursor.execute(sql)
        row = cursor.fetchone()
    except OperationalError, oe:    # deadlock, retry later
        transaction.rollback()
        return None
    # If an item is available, it is now marked with our process_id.

    # Retrieve any items with this process id
    items = cls.objects.all().filter(process_id=process_id)
    if len(items) == 0:     # No items available
        transaction.rollback()
        return None
    top = items[0]      # there should only be one item
    # ... perform some other actions here ...
    top.delete()        # This item is deleted from the queue
    transaction.commit()
    return item

As mentioned above, the deadlock occurs when two processes are running this same code at the same time. One process is trying to execute top.delete() when another process is executing the UPDATE query. The InnoDB row-level locking doesn't prevent the second process from trying to update the table here. Here is the output from show engine innodb status;:

------------------------
LATEST DETECTED DEADLOCK
------------------------
130625 13:30:22
*** (1) TRANSACTION:
TRANSACTION 0 821802296, ACTIVE 0 sec, process no 27565, OS thread id 139724816692992 starting index read
mysql tables in use 2, locked 2
LOCK WAIT 38 lock struct(s), heap size 14320, 14936 row lock(s)
MySQL thread id 2984294, query id 3142696474 example.com 10.0.1.1 mysql Sending data
UPDATE queue SET unique_id=100804 WHERE unique_id IS NULL ORDER BY id LIMIT 1
*** (1) WAITING FOR THIS LOCK TO BE GRANTED:
RECORD LOCKS space id 1476 page no 2469 n bits 280 index `PRIMARY` of table `mysql`.`queue` trx id 0 821802296 lock_mode X locks rec but not gap waiting
Record lock, heap no 208 PHYSICAL RECORD: n_fields 9; compact format; info bits 32
 0: len 4; hex 80290a1b; asc  )  ;; 1: len 6; hex 000030fbb547; asc   0  G;; 2: len 7; hex 0000002a471282; asc    *G  ;; 3: len 4; hex 80000005; asc     ;; 4: len 4; hex 800
00051; asc    Q;; 5: len 4; hex 07a27ca6; asc   | ;; 6: len 8; hex 8000124f06c3361e; asc    O  6 ;; 7: SQL NULL; 8: SQL NULL;

*** (2) TRANSACTION:
TRANSACTION 0 821802311, ACTIVE 0 sec, process no 27565, OS thread id 139724817225472 updating or deleting, thread declared inside InnoDB 499
mysql tables in use 1, locked 1
3 lock struct(s), heap size 1216, 2 row lock(s), undo log entries 1
MySQL thread id 2984268, query id 3142696582 example.com 10.0.1.1 mysql updating
DELETE FROM `queue` WHERE `id` IN (2689563)
*** (2) HOLDS THE LOCK(S):
RECORD LOCKS space id 1476 page no 2469 n bits 280 index `PRIMARY` of table `mysql`.`queue` trx id 0 821802311 lock_mode X locks rec but not gap
Record lock, heap no 208 PHYSICAL RECORD: n_fields 9; compact format; info bits 32
 0: len 4; hex 80290a1b; asc  )  ;; 1: len 6; hex 000030fbb547; asc   0  G;; 2: len 7; hex 0000002a471282; asc    *G  ;; 3: len 4; hex 80000005; asc     ;; 4: len 4; hex 800
00051; asc    Q;; 5: len 4; hex 07a27ca6; asc   | ;; 6: len 8; hex 8000124f06c3361e; asc    O  6 ;; 7: SQL NULL; 8: SQL NULL;

*** (2) WAITING FOR THIS LOCK TO BE GRANTED:
RECORD LOCKS space id 1476 page no 351 n bits 1200 index `queue_queue_id` of table `mysql`.`queue` trx id 0 821802311 lock_mode X locks rec but not gap waiting
Record lock, heap no 1128 PHYSICAL RECORD: n_fields 2; compact format; info bits 0
 0: len 4; hex 80000005; asc     ;; 1: len 4; hex 80290a1b; asc  )  ;;

*** WE ROLL BACK TRANSACTION (2)

My question is: what is the right way to implement a queue and perform a pop() operation in Python/Django and InnoDB? In particular, what changes need to be made to this code?

share|improve this question
2  
Not sure why this happens but have you tried removing the LIMIT from the UPDATE with something like UPDATE queue q JOIN (SELECT MIN(id) AS id FROM queue WHERE unique_id IS NULL) qi ON qi.id = q.id SET q.unique_id = %d ; (and having an index on (unique_id, id) so the locking is minimum)? – ypercubeᵀᴹ Jun 26 '13 at 5:53
    
Haven't tried that yet. Is the intent to lock a single row in both the table and the index, so it doesn't overlap with the DELETE query? Is this the only way to perform a single-row lock in an UPDATE? – Brent Washburne Jun 26 '13 at 20:22
    
I'm not really sure if this is the problem or the way you are doing the transactions and the visibility of the updates across sessions. I suggest you flag the question and ask for migration to DBA.SE where more people will look into this. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Jun 26 '13 at 20:29

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