Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

In my exercise I'm supposed to validate phone numbers, which of the correct are :

1234567890
123-456-7890
123.456.7890
(123)456-7890
(123) 456-7890
456-7890

I've tried [(]?[0-9][0-9][0-9][).-]? ?[0-9][0-9][0-9][.-]?[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9], but it seems it also accepts something like (123.456-7890. How I can handle this? Or I should take completely different way ?

Here are some invalid phone numbers:

123-45-6789
123:4567890
123/456-7890
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Mark, Kay, jahroy, squiguy, jarnbjo Jun 26 '13 at 1:17

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
You should show incorrect too, otherwise .* is a correct answer –  Bohemian Jun 25 '13 at 23:07
    
Ah, I've grappled with this problem before. It wouldn't be a bad idea to clearly outline the set of correct and incorrect inputs (for instance, I notice you can mix space and dash seperators, but not dots and brackets?) –  Anti Earth Jun 25 '13 at 23:07
    
@ashur, I believe that I meet all of your requirements. I edited my post and tried to explain in as much detail as possible. Hope it's helpful. –  Steve P. Jun 25 '13 at 23:59
    
The accepted answer of the Qn your Qn has been marked as a dup of doesn't solve it by regex.Please, have a look at my soln. I had tested all the negative test cases as well that you found passing on other solutions here. –  Ravi Thapliyal Jun 27 '13 at 6:29

3 Answers 3

Try this one (using look-aheads to match parenthesis and other balance checks):

^(?:((?=\(.*\).*\-)|(?!.*\()(?!.*\)))\(?[0-9]{3}\)?(((?<=[)])|[\-\s])(?=.*\-)|\.(?=.*\.)|(?<=^)|(?=[0-9]+$)))?[0-9]{3}[\s.-]?[0-9]{4}$

Or this one (using \d as this is my contestant to the shortest-regex parade):

^((\d{3}-|\(\d{3}\)\s?)?\d{3}-|^\d{3}(\.)?\d{3}\3)\d{4}$
share|improve this answer
    
I prefer using \d as opposed to [0-9]. Nice edit also. –  Java Devil Jun 25 '13 at 23:24
    
@JavaDevil Yeah, I do too. The thing is \d can match unicode digits as well. If that's not a worry, the regex would certainly look prettier with \d :) –  acdcjunior Jun 25 '13 at 23:26
    
Wait does this also handle the awkward scenario of 123.456-7890 where the separator between the numbers has to be consistent? I feel that's the challenging aspect of this question... –  aug Jun 25 '13 at 23:28
    
@aug Interesting! –  acdcjunior Jun 25 '13 at 23:29
2  
@acdcjunior - If that's pretty, I'd hate to see ugly... –  jahroy Jun 25 '13 at 23:39

Regex

^\d{10}|^(\(\d{3}\)\s?)?\d{3}-\d{4}$|^\d{3}([.-])\d{3}\2\d{4}$

Matches the following

1234567890
123-456-7890
123.456.7890
(123)456-7890
(123) 456-7890
456-7890

Does not match on

123-45-6789
123:4567890
123/456-7890
(123-456-7890
123.456-7890
(123)456.7890
share|improve this answer

This pattern works with your examples, i write it without the java escapes:

 ^(?>\(\d{3}\) ?|\d{3}[.-]?)?\d{3}[.-]?\d{4}$

Explanations:

 ^                 begining  of the string
 (?>               open an atomic group
    \(\d{3}\) ?    3 digits with parenthesis followed by a space or not
   |               OR
    \d{3}[.-]      3 digits followed by . or - or not
 )                 close atomic group
 ?                 the atomic group is optional
 \d{3}             3 digits
 [.-]?             followed by a . or a - (optional)
 \d{4}             4 digits
 $                 end of the string         
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.