Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.
#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    int x=getlength("Hello",10);
    printf("%d",x);
}
int getlength(char line[],int limit)
{
    int x;
    for(x=0;x<limit-1 && line[x]!=EOF && line[x]!='\n';++x)
    printf("%c",line[x]) ;
    printf("\n");
return x;
}

So this code seems to output this: Hello%d then it outputs on a new line 9

What I don't understand is where the %d came from and how length of Hello%d is equal to 9

If anyone can explain I'd be happy.

share|improve this question
1  
Replace EOF with '\0', which marks the end of a string. –  Adam Liss Jun 25 '13 at 23:32
    
Thanks a lot mate.But I want to understand something.Isn't EOF also the end of the string? I think I misunderstood something.Thanks anyways :D.I appreciate your help. –  Hasan Saad Jun 25 '13 at 23:34
    
EOF is defined to be negative, '\0' == 0 –  Quirliom Jun 25 '13 at 23:35
    
I think I'll google for these stuff.Thanks again :D –  Hasan Saad Jun 25 '13 at 23:36
    
EOF is End Of File –  BLUEPIXY Jun 25 '13 at 23:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A character string in C is terminated with a null character, '\0'. Change your for loop to test for the null character instead of EOF:

for (x=0; x < limit - 1 && line[x] != '\0' && line[x] != '\n'; ++x)

A function uses the constant EOF to signal the end of a file, but it's not used to terminate strings. That's because binary files can contain (unsigned) characters with values from 0 to 255. In order for a function to signal end-of-file, it must return a value that cannot appear within the file. Every implementation I've seen uses EOF = -1, because unsigned characters can never be negative.

A string, on the other hand, can only contain valid (unsigned) characters, so it can't use EOF to mark its end. Instead, it uses '\0', which is equivalent to the integer 0 and is a vailid—but unprintable—character.

A very common pitfall for programmers is to forget this, and either neglect to terminate a string with a null character (in which case a program will often scan past the end into invalid memory), or to try to manipulate strings that contain binary data (which sometimes includes a null character and terminates the string unexpectedly).

share|improve this answer
2  
The standard specifically requires EOF to be negative. The specific value is implementation-defined, but -1 seems to be universal, or nearly so. –  Keith Thompson Jun 25 '13 at 23:51

You for loop just counts to 9 as it never finds a EOF or a newline in the string "Hello".

The string "Hello" is terminated with a null character '\0', so change a part of for loop to line[x]!='\0'

share|improve this answer

The length of 'Hello' is 5. My hunch is you are reading those characters from the stack frame. You are reading from location even after 'hello' on the stack. This is what is there on the stack. Probably from the '%d' in the printf.

share|improve this answer
    
Nah it got fixed.I should have used \0 instead of EOF :D –  Hasan Saad Jun 25 '13 at 23:51

Try testing the NUL character value:

int getlength(char line[],int limit)
{
    int x;
    for(x=0;x<limit-1 && line[x]!='\n' && line[x]!='\0'; ++x)
    {
        printf("%c",line[x]) ;
    }
    printf("\n");
    return x;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Don't compare a stored character to EOF, which is a non-character value used by certain input functions to indicate there's no more data to be read. And don't refer to the null character as NULL, since NULL is (a macro that expands to) a null pointer constant (you got that right in the code, but mentioned "NULL" in the introductory sentence). –  Keith Thompson Jun 25 '13 at 23:56
    
Your right... I copied the original code too fast, a character value cannot be -1. –  Mathieu Rodic Jun 26 '13 at 0:01
    
Actually it can; if plain char is signed, then -1 is a value char value. It doesn't denote end-of-file or anything similar; it's just another character value -- which is why you shouldn't try to compare it to EOF. –  Keith Thompson Jun 26 '13 at 0:05
    
@KeithThompson; Thanks for your first comment. As ch = getchar() stores character one by one from input buffer to ch, Is it right to test a while loop as: while((ch = getchar()) != EOF), where ch is a char type`? –  haccks Jun 26 '13 at 17:37
1  
@haccks: No. getchar() returns a result of type int; you need to store it in an int object if you want to be able to distinguish between EOF and a valid char value that might be stored as 0xff or -1. See the comp.lang.c FAQ question 12.1. –  Keith Thompson Jun 26 '13 at 17:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.