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I have to overload the basic arithmetic operators for some very complicated objects I've made. So far, I've successfully implemented operator*; now I need operator+, etc. The code for operator* is very large, but the only difference between operator* and operator+ will be one line where I use + instead of * on some complex numbers. This line will be inside of a loop that gets called many many times, so I want it to be efficient, which would seem to imply no function pointers. (Correct me if I'm wrong.)

This seems like a perfect use for templates. But I'm at a loss as to the correct syntax. I'm thinking something like this inside the ComplicatedObject class definition:

template <typename ComplexBinaryOp>
ComplicatedObject BinaryOp(const ComplicatedObject& B) const {
  // Do lots of stuff
  for(unsigned int i=0; i<OneBazillion; ++i) {
    // Here, the f[i] are std::complex<double>'s:
    C.f[i] = ComplexBinaryOp(f[i], B.f[i]);
  }
  // Do some more stuff
  return C;
}

inline ComplicatedObject operator*(const ComplicatedObject& B) const {
  return BinaryOp<std::complex::operator*>(B);
}

inline ComplicatedObject operator+(const ComplicatedObject& B) const {
  return BinaryOp<std::complex::operator+>(B);
}

This question is related: "function passed as template argument". But the functions passed as the template arguments are not operators.

I've fiddled with the syntax every way I can think of, but the compiler always complains of bad syntax. How should I do this?

Edit:

For clarity, I include the complete solution in terms of my code above, along with the additional generalizations people may need:

template <typename ComplexBinaryOp>
ComplicatedObject BinaryOp(const ComplicatedObject& B) const {
  // Do lots of stuff
  for(unsigned int i=0; i<OneBazillion; ++i) {
    // Here, the f[i] are std::complex<double>'s:
    C.f[i] = ComplexBinaryOp()(f[i], B.f[i]); // Note extra ()'s
  }
  // Do some more stuff
  return C;
}

inline ComplicatedObject operator+(const ComplicatedObject& B) const {
  return BinaryOp<std::plus<std::complex<double> > >(B);
}

inline ComplicatedObject operator-(const ComplicatedObject& B) const {
  return BinaryOp<std::minus<std::complex<double> > >(B);
}

inline ComplicatedObject operator*(const ComplicatedObject& B) const {
  return BinaryOp<std::multiplies<std::complex<double> > >(B);
}

inline ComplicatedObject operator/(const ComplicatedObject& B) const {
  return BinaryOp<std::divides<std::complex<double> > >(B);
}
share|improve this question
1  
std::complex is a class template, so you need std::complex<double>. But even then, complex<T>::operator* and complex<T>::operator+ are member functions. You can't just pass them around without an instance of complex<T> to operate on. –  Praetorian Jun 26 '13 at 4:02
    
Post errors you are getting. –  n.m. Jun 26 '13 at 4:02
1  
+1 for interesting question. I also found this question -- c++ pointers to operators relevant and interesting. –  keelar Jun 26 '13 at 4:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think std::plus<std::complex> and std::multiplies<std::complex> are what you're looking for, but I'm not 100% sure I understand your question (is your code snippet within a class you aren't showing us?)

share|improve this answer
    
+1, I think this is what the OP is looking for too, but it should be plus<complex<double>> and multiplies<complex<double>> –  Praetorian Jun 26 '13 at 4:04
    
@Praetorian: so plus and multiplies can be used without specifying the std scope? –  keelar Jun 26 '13 at 4:08
    
+1 Yes, this looks like what I want, alright (though @Praetorian is right). But I can't quite figure out how to use these functions. The compiler objects to my line ComplexBinaryOp(f[i], B.f[i]). Any help on that? –  Mike Jun 26 '13 at 4:12
    
@keelar That's not what I meant. std::complex is a class template, so it needs to be specialized for a type. std::plus<std::complex<double>> and so forth. (Although you could use plus and multiplies unqualified as long as you qualify complex because of ADL) –  Praetorian Jun 26 '13 at 4:14
2  
@me ComplexBinaryOp()(f[i], B.f[i]) does the job. Note the extra parentheses. –  Mike Jun 26 '13 at 4:37

You have two options. Pass the function at runtime:

#include <functional>

template <typename ComplexBinaryOp>
ComplicatedObject BinaryOp(const ComplicatedObject& B, ComplexBinaryOp op) const {
  // ...
    C.f[i] = op(f[i], B.f[i]);
  // ...
}

// functor wrapping member function pointer
BinaryOp(B, std::mem_fn(&std::complex<double>::operator+));

// standard-issue functor
BinaryOp(B, std::plus<std::complex<double>>());

Or pass it at compile-time:

// or another floating-point type
typedef double (*ComplexBinaryOp)(double, double);

template <ComplexBinaryOp op>
ComplicatedObject BinaryOp(const ComplicatedObject& B) const {
  // ...
    C.f[i] = op(f[i], B.f[i]);
  // ...
}

// non-member function
template<class T>
std::complex<T> add_complex(const std::complex<T>& a, const std::complex<T>& b) {
  return a + b;
}

// non-member function pointer
BinaryOp<add_complex<double>>(B);

I believe you can do the same with member function pointers as well by changing the definition of ComplexBinaryOp.

share|improve this answer
    
These look like useful possibilities. I'll try things out and get back to you. Thanks! –  Mike Jun 26 '13 at 4:14
    
Turns out my original syntax works just fine, after replacing std::complex::operator* with std::multiplies, etc. Yours also work, but they strike me as less simple. –  Mike Jun 26 '13 at 4:42
1  
@Mike: Yeah, that works too. You do have to say ComplexBinaryOp()(foo, bar) to actually get the functor instance, though. That can just as well be done inside or outside as in my first example. –  Jon Purdy Jun 26 '13 at 23:08

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