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Let's say I have an XML document that has this:

<keywords>
<keyword>test</keyword>
<keyword>test2</keyword>
<keyword>test3</keyword>
<keyword>test4</keyword>
</keywords>

And i want to use XSLT to print it out in HTML like this:

<ul>
<li>test</li>
<li>test2</li>
<li>test3</li>
<li>test4</li>
</ul>

What would my XSLT look like? I tried this:

<ul>
<xsl:for-each select="keywords/keyword">
    <li><xsl:value-of select="keyword"/></li>
</xsl:for-each>
</ul>

but that doesn't print out the keyword value, just a blank item.

<ul>
<xsl:for-each select="keywords">
    <li><xsl:value-of select="keyword"/></li>
</xsl:for-each>
</ul>

doesn't work (for obvious reasons), but at least it prints the first keyword!

suggestions? thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted
<ul>
<xsl:for-each select="keywords/keyword">    
  <li><xsl:value-of select="text()"/></li>
</xsl:for-each>
</ul>

using text() should get you the text inside the keyword node

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thanks for the help! –  lawdawg Nov 13 '09 at 19:27
5  
Actually, in this case, using select="." will work too (the node will be atomized, which effectively means a concatenation of values of all nested text nodes on all levels). –  Pavel Minaev Nov 13 '09 at 19:32
    
Good to know. Thank! –  dnagirl Nov 13 '09 at 19:44

I would suggest avoiding for-each here, and doing it using a template - it's more idiomatic in XSLT, especially when you have a clear one-to-one mapping:

<xsl:template match="keyword">
    <li><xsl:value-of select="."/></li>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="keywords">
    <ul><xsl:apply-templates/></ul>
</xsl:template>
share|improve this answer
1  
Agreed - major programmer issue in adapting to XSLT is to think in terms of for-each (and call-template) instead of using apply-tempaltes and match= –  Murph Nov 13 '09 at 19:42
2  
agreed. Avoid for-each where you can. –  Jon W Nov 13 '09 at 19:49
    
Agreed, but use xsl:apply-templates without its select attribute only when the XML schema is well known and stable; otherwise, if there's any tag whose the template is missing, it will be processed by default templates and its text content will be put on the output. –  Erlock Nov 15 '09 at 8:55
1  
@Erlock: I usually start with a default rule for all nodes that simply calls <xsl:apply-template/>. That way you get tree propagation for all nodes, but no output, by default. –  Pavel Minaev Nov 15 '09 at 20:05
    
I wholeheartedly agree to the apply-templates vs for-each argument. +1 –  Tomalak Nov 16 '09 at 9:49

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