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I want to be able to compare Decimals in Python. For the sake of making calculations with money, clever people told me to use Decimals instead of floats, so I did. However, if I want to verify that a calculation produces the expected result, how would I go about it?

>>> a = Decimal(1./3.)
>>> a
Decimal('0.333333333333333314829616256247390992939472198486328125')
>>> b = Decimal(2./3.)
>>> b
Decimal('0.66666666666666662965923251249478198587894439697265625')
>>> a == b
False
>>> a == b - a
False
>>> a == b - Decimal(1./3.)
False

so in this example a = 1/3 and b = 2/3, so obviously b-a = 1/3 = a, however, that cannot be done with Decimals.

I guess a way to do it is to say that I expect the result to be 1/3, and in python i write this as

Decimal(1./3.).quantize(...)

and then I can compare it like this:

(b-a).quantize(...) == Decimal(1./3.).quantize(...)

So, my question is: Is there a cleaner way of doing this? How would you write tests for Decimals?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are not using Decimal the right way.

>>> from decimal import *

>>> Decimal(1./3.)                  # Your code
Decimal('0.333333333333333314829616256247390992939472198486328125')

>>> Decimal("1")/Decimal("3")       # My code
Decimal('0.3333333333333333333333333333')

In "your code", you actually perform "classic" floating point division -- then convert the result to a decimal. The error introduced by floats is propagated to your Decimal.

In "my code", I do the Decimal division. Producing a correct (but truncated) result up to the last digit.


Concerning the rounding. If you work with monetary data, you must know the rules to be used for rounding in your business. If not so, using Decimal will not automagically solve all your problems. Here is an example: $100 to be share between 3 shareholders.

>>> TWOPLACES = Decimal(10) ** -2

>>> dividende = Decimal("100.00")
>>> john = (dividende / Decimal("3")).quantize(TWOPLACES)
>>> john
Decimal('33.33')
>>> paul = (dividende / Decimal("3")).quantize(TWOPLACES)
>>> georges = (dividende / Decimal("3")).quantize(TWOPLACES)
>>> john+paul+georges
Decimal('99.99')

Oups: missing $.01 (free gift for the bank ?)

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That makes sense. But it is still necessary to truncate/quantize the result in order to make proper comparisons? –  Eldamir Jun 26 '13 at 7:42
    
@Eldamir I have updated the answer with some elements relevant to the comparison. For monetary value, you will truncate/round all your result to a fixed number of decimal after the "dot". Usually 2 -- but something 4 ou 5. Anyway, you should have some clear rules for that, otherwise you will end up with cents "floating around" -- just like in "Superman 3" :D –  Sylvain Leroux Jun 26 '13 at 7:49

Floating-point arithmetics is not accurate :

Decimal numbers can be represented exactly. In contrast, numbers like 1.1 and 2.2 do not have exact representations in binary floating point. End users typically would not expect 1.1 + 2.2 to display as 3.3000000000000003 as it does with binary floating point

You have to choose a resolution and truncate everything past it :

>>> from decimal import *
>>> getcontext().prec = 6
>>> Decimal(1) / Decimal(7)
Decimal('0.142857')
>>> getcontext().prec = 28
>>> Decimal(1) / Decimal(7)
Decimal('0.1428571428571428571428571429')

You will obviously get some rounding error which will grow with the number of operations so you have to choose your resolution carefully.

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In this case, you really don't want to use the Decimal object.

You want to use the Fraction object.

I think this is the result you are looking for:

>>> from fractions import Fraction
>>> a = Fraction(1,3)
>>> a
Fraction(1, 3)
>>> b = Fraction(2,3)
>>> b
Fraction(2, 3)
>>> a == b
False
>>> a == b - a
True
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There is another approach that may work for you:

  • Continue to do all your calculations in floating point values
  • When you need to compare for equality, use round(val, places)

For example:

>>> a = 1./3
>>> a
0.33333333333333331
>>> b = 2./3
>>> b
0.66666666666666663
>>> b-a
0.33333333333333331
>>> round(a,2) == round(b-a, 2)
True

If you'd like, create a function equals_to_the_cent():

>>> def equals_to_the_cent(a, b):
...   return round(a, 2) == round(b, 2)
...
>>> equals_to_the_cent(a, b)
False
>>> equals_to_the_cent(a, b-a)
True
>>> equals_to_the_cent(1-a, b)
True
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