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I have a struct with pointers to floats that i want to turn into an array of an indeterminate size. At the beginning of my program I want to declare a few of these structs and turn them into different sized arrays, like this:

struct _arr {
   float * a;
}

...

_arr x;
x.a = (float *)malloc(sizeof(float)*31);
x.a = { 6,
        1, 1, 1, 0     , 0     ,
        1, 0, 1, 0     , 0.0625,
        1, 1, 0, 0.0625, 0     ,
        1, 0, 1, 0     , 0.0625,
        1, 0, 0, 0.0625, 0.0625,
        1, 1, 0, 0.0625, 0
      };

Unfortunately this doesn't work, does anyone have any suggestions get the values into the array besides adding in each value in individually (such as a[0] = 6;)?

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2  
Can you store an std::vector<float> instead of a pointer? –  juanchopanza Jun 26 '13 at 7:31
2  
If you know the contents at compile time, why do you need a dynamic array? –  Philipp Matthias Schäfer Jun 26 '13 at 7:32
    
@PhilippMatthiasSchäfer they could need different instances to hold arrays of different sizes, with different values. –  juanchopanza Jun 26 '13 at 7:34
    
Yes, im using different instances of different sizes. –  Diabl0658 Jun 26 '13 at 7:39
1  
Accessing a vector is very unlikely to be slower than accessing a dynamically allocated array. –  juanchopanza Jun 26 '13 at 8:22
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3 Answers 3

This could be simplified by storing a std::vector<float>:

#include <vector>

struct arr_ {
   std::vector<float> a;
};

In C++11, the initialization is trivial:

arr_ x{ {1.0f, 2.0f, 3.0f, 4.0f, 5.0f} };

Unfortunately, there is no trivial way to perform such an initialization in C++03. One option would be to initialize from a temporary fixed size array:

float farray_[5] = {1.0f, 2.0f, 3.0f, 4.0f, 5.0f};
arr_ x{ std::vector<float>(farray_, farray_+5)};
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+1 though C++11 only, because of uniform initialization. What would be the recommended way without C++11? –  Andre Jun 26 '13 at 7:48
1  
To be accurate _arr is perfectly fine (I still wouldn't recommend it, of course), but _Arr wouldn't be. It's double underscores and leading underscores followed by upper-case letters. –  Christian Rau Jun 26 '13 at 7:59
    
@Andre I can't think of a C++03 solution that doesn't involve setting the elements one by one, or copying the elements of a fixed size array into the vector. –  juanchopanza Jun 26 '13 at 8:03
    
By the way, you're using double literals instead of floats. Of course this is just fine and the compiler will take care of it, but if not caring about a correctly typed literal, there isn't any need for a floating-point literal in the first place and you could just leave away the dot anyway. –  Christian Rau Jun 26 '13 at 8:25
    
@ChristianRau thanks for the comments. These details are important here, since this is meant to be educational. I have edited the answer accordingly. –  juanchopanza Jun 26 '13 at 8:28
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You can initialize an array on the stack and then copy/memcpy to your dynamic memory. But using vector as suggested would be the better choice.

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x.a is a pointer and when you change x.a = xx you change the address

try this code:

x.a = new float( 6, 1, 1, 1, 0 , 0 , 1, 0, 1, 0 , 0.0625, 1, 1, 0, 0.0625, 0 , 1, 0, 1, 0 , 0.0625, 1, 0, 0, 0.0625, 0.0625, 1, 1, 0, 0.0625, 0 ) ;

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Have you even tried that? –  juanchopanza Jun 26 '13 at 11:10
    
yep in vs2010 and i have a warning –  beyrem Jun 26 '13 at 11:28
    
I tried it and it doesnt work, it just uses the last value. –  Diabl0658 Jun 27 '13 at 2:44
    
Is there a way I can work with x.a = new float[31] ? Doing that produces an empty array of 31 size, but is there a trivial way to fill that array up? –  Diabl0658 Jun 27 '13 at 5:02
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