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I am making a site that determines the value of an array based on what time it is. I wrote this awful (functional) script, and am wondering if I could have made it more concise. I started with a case/switch statement, but had trouble getting multiple conditionals working with it. Here's the dirty deed:

if ($now < november 18th) {
    $array_to_use = $home;
}
elseif (november 18th < $now && $now < november 21st ) {
    $array_to_use = $driving;
}
elseif (november 21st < $now && $now < november 22nd) {
    $array_to_use = $flying;
}
...
...
...
elseif (february 1st < $now) {
    $array_to_use = $arrived;
}
else {
    $array_to_use = $default;
}

The schedule is actually more complicated and has 13 elseifstatements in it. Can someone please confirm that I just had coder's block and that there's a better way to do this?

EDIT: I changed the Unix Timestamps to rough real times so it's easier to understand what I'm doing (hopefully)

EDIT 2: Please forgive the currently broken Javascript clock, but this is the site I'm working on:

Time Table.

Each array is based on my location, and there are 15 "they are currently" based on the time it is. It's a small problem domain with known start/end times, so flexibility isn't key, just getting it all written. You can see how the time is continuous, and only one array of strings needs to be selected at a time.

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1  
Is there math to your chosen timestamps? –  Nerdling Nov 13 '09 at 19:45
    
There is math, yes. $now gets divided and rounded a few times –  Alex Mcp Nov 13 '09 at 19:47
    
How many conditions? Do they overlap, or is each condition exclusive? –  Mike Crowe Nov 13 '09 at 19:48
1  
what about the other timestamps, any logic to those? patterns? Math? –  Phill Pafford Nov 13 '09 at 19:49
4  
+1 for great post title –  Pekka 웃 Nov 13 '09 at 19:54

6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

First , please please please take out your hardcoded numbers and put them into constants.

$FLIGHT_START_TIME = 1258956001;
$FLIGHT_END_TIME   = 1260511201;

Second, I would make mini functions for each of the conditionals:

I.e.

function isFlying($time)
{
    return ( $FLIGHT_START_TIME < $time && $time < $FLIGHT_END_TIME );
}

Third, take your whole set of conditionals, and put it into a function to get your current state, and replace in your function calls:

function getStateArrayForTime($time)
{

   if (isDriving($time)
   {
       return $driving;
   }
   if ( isFlying($time) )
   {
        return $flying;
   }
...etc
}

Last, replace the whole inline section of code with your single function call:

$currentState = getStateArrayForTime($now);

As other posters have also commented, at this point you can use a data table driven function to return the state if you know only the start and end time will be the state parameters:

so replace the implementation of getStateArrayForTime with:

function getStateArrayForTime ($time)
{
// 
$states = array (
    array("startTime" => 1258956001, "endTime" => 1260511201, "state" => $flying),
    array("startTime" => 1260511201, "endTime" => 1260517000, "state" => $driving),
..etc...
);
    foreach($states as $checkStateArray)
    {
        if($checkStateArray['startTime'] < $time && $time < $checkStateArray['endTime'])
        {
            return $checkStateArray['state'];
        }
    }
    return null;
}

Finally, some people might ask "why do things in this order?" I can't claim credit at all, other than in the application, but Martin Fowler has a great book called "Refactoring" that explains why you clean code up one step at a time, and test at each step of the way, then finally replace functions wholesale that don't make sense, all the while testing that they are functionally equivalent.

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1  
That's all great advice. Verbose, but clean. I'm a hack. Thanks! –  Alex Mcp Nov 13 '09 at 19:54
2  
The problem with that is if you end up 200 more states you have 200 more functions (he's already up to 13 of them). Adding more states shouldn't increase the code, just some (preferably external) data block. –  Ry4an Nov 13 '09 at 19:55
    
You could also make the $FLIGHT_START_TIME = 1258956001; $FLIGHT_END_TIME = 1260511201; dynamic if you needed that flexibility as well, instead of hard coding these dates/times –  Phill Pafford Nov 13 '09 at 19:56
1  
If the state is truly only a time driven data table, then yes, a single function could be made to look up the state based on the time range using a data table. However, only seeing a small set of cases, and not knowing whether other conditions may influence the state, I prefer to leave the flexibility of each state being defined as a function. –  Zak Nov 13 '09 at 19:58
    
Poster has clarified. It is/should be table driven. Answer modified appropriately. –  Zak Nov 13 '09 at 20:32

It might be overkill, but I would have done something like this so that I could put all the time ranges in one clear spot:

@timeWindows = ({ start -> 0, end -> 1258783201, array -> $home },
                ... ,
                {start -> 1260511201, end -> MAXVAL, array -> $arrived});

and then a loop like

$array_to_use = $default;

foreach (my $window in @timeWindows) {
   if (($now > $window->start) && ($now < $window->end)) {
       $array_to_use = $window->array;
       last;
   }
}

Sorry it's in Perl, I don't know PHP, but I imagine it's similar.

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1  
This is the best answer because it allows the time boundaries to be determined programatically. It's not clear whether the OP requires that but it's hard to imagine useful code that wouldn't. –  Ben Dunlap Nov 13 '09 at 19:59
    
Thanks. It looks like the answer in the lead just modified to look just like mine, so I guess you're not the only one to think so. :) –  Ry4an Nov 13 '09 at 21:29

You can put the time and array to use in an array and loop them to select.

$Selctions = array(
    1258783201 => $Home,
    1258956001 => $Driving,
    1260511201 => $Flying,
    ...
    1260511201 => $Arriving
);

// MUST SORT so that the checking will not skip
ksort($Selction);
$TimeToUse = -1;
$Now       = ...;
foreach ($Selctions as $Time => $Array) {
    if ($Now < $Time) {
        $TimeToUse = $Time;
        break;
    }
}
$ArrayToUse = ($TimeToUse != -1) ? $Selctions[$TimeToUse] : $Default;

This method can only be used when the times has no gap (one range right after another).

Hope this helps.

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You can use a switch statement, doing something like this:

switch (true)
{
    case $now < 1258783201:
        // your stuff
        break;
    case $now < 1258783201
        // more of your stuff
        break;
    //...
}

That's at least a little cleaner...

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Something like this:

$array_to_use = null;
$dispatch = array(1258783201, $home, 1258956001, $driving, ..., $arrived);
for ($i=0; i<count($dispatch); $i+=2) {
    if ($now<$dispatch[$i]) {
        $array_to_use = $dispatch[$i+1];
        break;
    }
}
if ($array_to_use==null) $array_to_use = $dispatch[count($dispatch)-1];

You also need to think about whether you need "<" or "<=" condition.

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1  
I think this code is icky, but won't downvote. Why not put your array of elements into a clearly readable format? or use 2 separate arrays? –  Zak Nov 13 '09 at 20:28

You might want to learn the Command Pattern; it can also help in this circumstance.

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