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Im trying to use interfaces to call different subroutines with different types, however, it doesnt seem to work when i use the pointer attribute. for example, take this sample code

 MODULE ptr_types
     TYPE, abstract :: parent
        INTEGER :: q
     END TYPE
     TYPE, extends(parent) :: child
        INTEGER :: m
     END TYPE
     INTERFACE ptr_interface
        MODULE PROCEDURE do_something
     END INTERFACE
     CONTAINS
        SUBROUTINE do_something(atype)
           CLASS(parent), POINTER :: atype
           ! code determines that this allocation is correct from input
           ALLOCATE(child::atype)
           WRITE (*,*) atype%q
        END SUBROUTINE
  END MODULE
  PROGRAM testpass
     USE ptr_types
     CLASS(child), POINTER :: ctype

     CALL ptr_interface(ctype)
  END PROGRAM

This gives error Error: There is no specific subroutine for the generic 'ptr_interface' at (1)

however if i remove the pointer attribute in the subroutine it compiles fine. Now, normally this wouldnt be a problem, but for my use case i need to be able to treat that argument as a pointer, mainly so i can allocate it if necessary.

Any suggestions? Mind you I'm new to fortran so I may have missed something

edit: forgot to put the allocation in the parents subroutine, the initial input is unallocated

EDIT 2 this is my second attempt, with caller side casting

    MODULE ptr_types
       TYPE, abstract :: parent
        INTEGER :: q
        END TYPE
        TYPE, extends(parent) :: child
          INTEGER :: m
        END TYPE
        TYPE, extends(parent) :: second
           INTEGER :: meow
        END TYPE
        CONTAINS
           SUBROUTINE do_something(this, type_num)
              CLASS(parent), POINTER :: this
              INTEGER type_num
              IF (type_num == 0) THEN
                 ALLOCATE (child::this)
              ELSE IF (type_num == 1) THEN
                 ALLOCATE (second::this)
              ENDIF
           END SUBROUTINE
     END MODULE
     PROGRAM testpass
        USE ptr_types
        CLASS(child), POINTER :: ctype
        SELECT TYPE(ctype)
        CLASS is (parent)
           CALL do_something(ctype, 0)
        END SELECT
        WRITE (*,*) ctype%q
     END PROGRAM

however this still fails. in the select statement it complains that parent must extend child. Im sure this is due to restrictions when dealing with the pointer attribute, for type safety, however, im looking for a way to convert a pointer into its parent type for generic allocation. Rather than have to write separate allocation functions for every type and hope they dont collide in an interface or something.

hopefully this example will illustrate a little more clearly what im trying to achieve, if you know a better way let me know

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3 Answers 3

As indicated by High Performance Mark, you have a mismatch in the declared type of the actual and dummy arguments for the call to ptr_interface. This isn't permitted if the dummy argument has the pointer or allocatable attribute - see 12.5.2.5p2 of F2008.

There's a simple rationale for this restriction (which is discussed in Note 12.27 in the F2008 standard) - without it it would be possible for the subroutine to allocate the dummy argument to be of a type that is incompatible with the actual argument. For example - imagine if there was another extension of Parent in the program somewhere - a sibling of Child in the type heirarchy. If your do_something procedure allocate its dummy argument to that sibling type, then back in the the calling scope you have something declared as type Child that is actually some other incompatible (not an extension of Child) type.

If the do_something procedure cannot allocate the thing to anything other than type Child, then make its dummy argument of type Child. If it can allocate it to some other type that is an extension of Parent, then you need to make the declared type of the actual argument type Parent as well. You can use the SELECT TYPE construct to then downcast to an object of Child type in the calling scope.

Subsequent to your edits, my suggestion was for your main program to look something like:

PROGRAM testpass
  USE ptr_types
  IMPLICIT NONE           ! <-- 
  CLASS(Parent), POINTER :: ctype
  !***
  ! ctype here is a pointer with undefined association status, 
  ! (so no concept of dynamic type) and declared type Parent.
  CALL do_something(ctype, 0)
  ! Assuming successful ALLOCATE(Child :: xxx) in the procedure, 
  ! ctype here is an associated pointer with dynamic type Child.
  SELECT TYPE(ctype)
  CLASS is (Child)
    ! Declared type of ctype in here is Child.  Dynamic type 
    ! in this specific case is also Child, but this block would 
    ! also be executed if the dynamic type was a further extension
    ! of Child, because a CLASS IS guard was used.  (A TYPE IS 
    ! guard requires an exact match of dynamic type.)
    ! 
    ! If the allocate in do_something allocated the dummy argument 
    ! to be of type second or nullified the argument, then this 
    ! block of code would not be executed.  If do_something left 
    ! the association status of the pointer undefined, then 
    ! your program is non-conforming, and anything could happen.
    WRITE (*,*) ctype%m   
    ! Continue to work with ctype as a thing with declared type 
    ! Child inside this block of the select type construct.
  END SELECT
  ! ctype back to having a declared type of Parent.
  WRITE (*,*) ctype%q
  ! Don't forget deallocation!
 END PROGRAM
share|improve this answer
    
As I predicted, along you come :-) Thanks for the clarification and reference. –  High Performance Mark Jun 26 '13 at 13:40
    
yeah, that all makes sense and i understood it, I guess i was just hoping that there was a way to do the casting in the subroutine itself rather than in the calling routines scope. because i need to use this same pattern for multiple hierarchies i was hoping to write the generic pattern and wrap them in an interface. Ill just have to alter my design. but how does select type work on uninitialized values? will there be an excption if i use select type () on a null reference? –  icarusthecow Jun 26 '13 at 13:50

If I change your line

 CLASS(child), POINTER :: ctype

to

 CLASS(parent), POINTER :: ctype

then your program compiles and executes. I'm quite new to all this object-oriented Fortran myself so I struggle to point to the clause in the standard which states the rules for rank-type-kind matching in this case and clarifies your mistake. Your mistake may simply be to use a compiler which doesn't implement the latest features of the language. On the other hand, perhaps my compiler (Intel Fortran 13.1) implements the latest features as incorrectly as yours does.

(On past form a guy named IanH here on SO will pass by later and clarify.)

One thing I have learned though, is that if your compiler is Fortran 2003 compliant (enough) then making variables ALLOCATABLE rather than POINTER makes a number of operations easier and passes the responsibility for freeing unwanted memory to the compiler. You don't need pointers for dynamic memory management in Fortran any more.

share|improve this answer
    
while true, i need that line to be the child because i want to be able to just do "allocate(childptr)" without having to specify. and have it upcast when its passed to the subroutine. Basically im trying to have a common subroutine call for all the types that extend a class –  icarusthecow Jun 26 '13 at 10:56
    
Hmmm, not sure that you shouldn't post a new or revised question. You write that you want to allocate(childptr), without explicitly declaring its (extension) type, and then pass childptr into a subroutine for upcasting. I'm not sure what upcasting means but you should be able to dynamically (re-)allocate it to any other type which extends the class childptr is declared with inside a subroutine. –  High Performance Mark Jun 26 '13 at 12:10
    
possibly the question was unclear, but i want to be able to hand of the allocation of a pointer to a subroutine. –  icarusthecow Jun 26 '13 at 13:19
    
I see. Your code originally allocated the pointer before it was passed to the subroutine, so yes, that was confusing. –  High Performance Mark Jun 26 '13 at 13:24
    
ie, give an abstract pointer as a variable, the subroutine allocates and inializes it and returns the abstract pointer. I suppose i could use a function, but that only works if there is a common top abstract. In my actual situation i have 3+ levels of inheritance, so i cant assign a mid level to the top level, as that would be a pointer mismatch –  icarusthecow Jun 26 '13 at 13:36

I think that your problem comes from the POINTER attribute of the argument in the subroutine do_something. Delete it and all should work.

share|improve this answer
    
the issue is that i need that pointer. i need to allocate that pointer in the subroutine and initialize the data, and return that reference to the parent. if i remove the POINTER attribute i cannot allocate the pointer –  icarusthecow Jun 26 '13 at 13:15

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