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I have really strange problem. Here is the sample code:

class SomeClass(object):
    a = []
    b = []
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.a = [(1,2), (3,4)]
        self.b = self.a
        self.a.append((5,6))
        print self.b

SomeClass()

Print outputs [(1, 2), (3, 4), (5, 6)], but why, why result isn't [(1,2), (3,4)] ? Do you know how can I have the old value of self.a in self.b?

Thank you!

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1  
Because b points to a, when you change a, you change b as well –  matino Jun 26 '13 at 9:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You are assigning the same list to self.b, not a copy.

If you wanted self.b to refer to a copy of the list, create one using either list() or a full slice:

self.b = self.a[:]

or

self.b = list(self.a)

You can test this easily from the interactive interpreter:

>>> a = b = []  # two references to the same list
>>> a
[]
>>> a is b
True
>>> a.append(42)
>>> b
[42]
>>> b = a[:]  # create a copy
>>> a.append(3.14)
>>> a
[42, 3.14]
>>> b
[42]
>>> a is b
False
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Just to add the second method self.b = list(self.a), please add this also to the answer. –  Ankit Jaiswal Jun 26 '13 at 9:34
    
Thank you! Solved! –  user232343 Jun 26 '13 at 9:37

As many have already mentioned it, you end up having two references on the same list. Modifying the list by one reference of by the other just modify the list.

Here is an illustration to make things more clear if needed:

Shared reference

  • Step "A" is just after

    self.a = [(1,2), (3,4)]
    
  • Step "A" is just after

    self.b = self.a
    
  • Step "C" is just after

    self.a.append((5,6))
    
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How did you generate these images? –  undefined is not a function Jun 26 '13 at 10:11
1  
@AshwiniChaudhary Inkscape... –  Sylvain Leroux Jun 26 '13 at 10:20

self.b = self.a isn't copying the list. It's assigning the reference to that list, so both attributes point at the same object. If you modify it via one reference, you'll see the change via the other one too.

You can use copy.copy(the_list) to get the proper copy. Or copy.deepcopy(the_list) if you need the references below also updated.

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1  
List objects don't have a .copy method –  Blender Jun 26 '13 at 9:31
    
@Blender I guess he meant copy.copy(listname) –  Ankit Jaiswal Jun 26 '13 at 9:38
    
Yes, sorry could be more explicit. Edited now. –  viraptor Jun 26 '13 at 10:32

dicts in python share the same memory space when you assign them to each other.

for more information on this see: http://henry.precheur.org/python/copy_list

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2  
These are lists, not dictionaries. Lists do not have a .copy() method. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 26 '13 at 9:32
    
my mistake I'll edit my answer –  zidsal Jun 26 '13 at 9:32

Because self.a and self.b are actually references to the same list object.

If you want to modify one without changing the other, try this

class SomeClass(object):
    # a = []
    # b = [] # these two class member not necessary in this code
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.a = [(1,2), (3,4)]
        self.b = list(self.a) # copy to a new list
        self.a.append((5,6))
        print self.b

SomeClass()
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