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I'm getting the following error when trying to read the row and column count of a CSV:

> coercing to Unicode: need string or buffer, S3BotoStorageFile found

import csv

class CSV:
    def __init__(self, file=None):
        self.file = file

    def read_file(self):
        data = []
        file_read = read_file(self.file)
        return file_read

    def get_row_count(self):
        return len(self.read_file())

    def get_column_count(self):
        new_data = self.read_file()
        return len(new_data[0])

    def get_data(self, rows=1):
        data = self.read_file()
        return data[:rows]

def read_file(self):
    with open(self.file, 'r') as f:
        data = [row for row in csv.reader(f.read().splitlines())]
    return data

How do I resolve?

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1  
Can you add the stacktrace? –  Wolph Jun 26 '13 at 9:34
    
.splitlines() returns a list. csv.reader don't take lists I believe –  Niclas Nilsson Jun 26 '13 at 9:35
1  
there's no need to add anything csv.reader(f) is enough! –  zmo Jun 26 '13 at 9:36
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

well, after reading your code my first reaction was OMG! How many does he open that poor file?

Here's a new version of your class

class CSV:
    def __init__(self, file=None):
        self.file = file
        with open(self.file, 'r') as f:
            self.data = [row for row in csv.reader(f)]

    def get_row_count(self):
        return len(self.data)

    def get_column_count(self):
        return len(self.data[0])

    def get_data(self, rows=1):
        return self.data

I also fixed your csv.reader() handling. It accepts a file object, no need to .read() or .read().splitlines(), it can only lead to errors. Which may be the reason why it failed.

Ok, given from what you say, you're working on AWS, and your file is not a string path to a file, but already a file object. So you don't need the open() part as is. You may want to modify your code so it is as follows:

class CSV:
    def __init__(self, f=None):
        self.file = f
        if isinstance(self.file, str): # if the file is a string, it's a path that has to be opened
            with open(self.file, 'r') as f:
                self.data = [row for row in csv.reader(f)]
        elif isinstance(self.file, File) or isinstance(self.file, file): # if that's a file object, no need to open
            self.data = [row for row in csv.reader(self.file)]
        else: # otherwise, I don't know what to do, so aaaaaaaargh!
            raise Exception("File object type unknown: %s %s" % (type(file), file,))

    def get_row_count(self):
        return len(self.data)

    def get_column_count(self):
        return len(self.data[0])

    def get_data(self, rows=1):
        return self.data

Reading the S3BotoStorage.py, the S3BotoStorage class inherits from django.core.files.base.File, which inherits from django.core.files.utils.FileProxyMixin, which is a composition of attributes of the global python file class.

So a File object is not an instance of file, but it has a compatible interface. Therefore, in the previous code I have tested whether the self.file is a str, then it shall be a path that we open() so we get a file() and parse it. Otherwise, self.file is a File object or a file() object, and we just need to parse it. If it's neither of those, then it's an error, and we shall except.

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Thanks @zmo really helpful :) very cool. I still get the error coercing to Unicode: need string or buffer, FieldFile found on this line now: with open(self.file, 'r') as f: –  GrantU Jun 26 '13 at 9:40
    
where does 'File' come from? is that an import from Python? –  GrantU Jun 26 '13 at 9:47
1  
in your case, that File object is from django.core.files.base import File (cf S3BotoStorage.py) Otherwise it comes from django.core.files.utils.FileProxyMixin, which is a composition of the file object's attributes. –  zmo Jun 26 '13 at 9:59
    
Amazing answer thanks so much for explaining this all so clearly. –  GrantU Jun 26 '13 at 10:08
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