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Let's say I have a disposable object MyDisposable whom take as a constructor parameter another disposable object.

using(MyDisposable myDisposable= new MyDisposable(new AnotherDisposable()))
{
     //whatever
}

Assuming myDisposable don't dispose the AnotherDisposable inside it's dispose method.

Does this only dispose correctly myDisposable? or it dispose the AnotherDisposable too?

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2  
Yes, it does, it does not dispose the AnotherDisposable, you need to manage manually –  Cuong Le Jun 26 '13 at 10:12
    
AnotherDisposable should be disposed on MyDisposable implementation since its used in there. –  AgentFire Jun 26 '13 at 10:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

using is an equivalent of

MyDisposable myDisposable = new MyDisposable(new AnotherDisposable());
try
{
    //whatever
}
finally
{
    if (myDisposable != null)
        myDisposable.Dispose();
}

Thus, if myDisposable does not call Dispose on AnotherDisposable, using won't call it either.

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Nice clear answer. –  Sander Jun 26 '13 at 10:14
    
Perfect this actually respond my question –  Fabio Marcolini Jun 26 '13 at 10:33

Why not nest them?

using(var outer = new AnotherDisposable())
{
   using(var inner = new MyDisposable(outer))
   {
      //whatever
   }

}

Now at least you can be sure they'll be disposed off correctly.

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the problem is that using the double using makes FxCop show the CA2202: object shouldn't be disposed multiple time, but that's because in the real case I'm using I know the innerDisposable is disposed by the outerDisposable so i guessed if this can be done –  Fabio Marcolini Jun 26 '13 at 10:15
    
+1, best way to handle cleanup. As a note, the second set of brackets are not even required. It comes down to your formatting preference but you can stack using statements directly on top of each other and use the same brackets to denote the scope. –  Amicable Jun 26 '13 at 10:19

It doesn't "dispose" anything. It calls the Dispose method of the object used within it. Its your job to clean up anything else.. perhaps by calling dispose on the other object.

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In this case, it won't dispose the AnotherDisposable. There are two solutions to this.

First, what you would normally do is the following:

using (AnotherDisposable anotherDisposable = new AnotherDisposable())
using (MyDisposable myDisposable= new MyDisposable(anotherDisposable))
{
}

However, there is a different way to go. It's normal that when a class takes a disposable, it itself will take care of disposing the object it took. E.g. the StreamReader that wraps a Stream will dispose of the Stream it wraps. That means that the construct you choose would work. You can implement this same feature in MyDisposable and then the approach you took will be OK.

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The pattern using (MyDisposable myDisposable = new MyDisposable(new AnotherDisposable()) {...} pattern will only be safe if the constructor for MyDisposable promises not only that MyDisposable.Dispose will dispose the object passed into the constructor, but also that if any exception occurs during the constructor itself the passed-in item will be disposed immediately--a pattern which is much harder than it should be to get right. –  supercat Jul 8 '13 at 19:44

C#’s using statement provides a syntactic shortcut for calling Dispose on objects that implement IDisposable, using a try/finally block. For example:

using (FileStream fs = new FileStream ("myFile.txt", FileMode.Open))
{
// ... Write to the file ...
}

The compiler converts this to: FileStream fs = new FileStream ("myFile.txt", FileMode.Open);

try
{
// ... Write to the file ...
}
finally
{
if (fs != null) ((IDisposable)fs).Dispose();
}

The finally block ensures that the Dispose method is called even when an exception is thrown,1 or the code exits the block early.

So for using single block will only ensure that the single disposable object will be disposed. on the other hand you can use a nested using statements. like

using (myDisposable d = new myDisposable())
{
  using(Disposable2 d2 = new Disposable2())
  {
// do something and dispose...
  }
}

and this will be converted as

try
{
  // work around for myDisposable  

    try
     {
      // work around for Disposable2 
     }
    finally
    {
    if (d2 != null) 
         ((IDisposable)d2 ).Dispose();
    }    
}
finally
{
     if (d!= null)
          ((IDisposable)d).Dispose();
}
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