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I have a stored procedure in SQL Server 2000 that runs a bunch of Exec statements that all perform bulk inserts from a linked server to the local database. The linked server is a SQL Server 2012 instance.

This is a sample of the procedure:

Create Procedure CopyData(@LinkedServerName Varchar(10), @LinkedServerDatabase Varchar(20)) 
AS
BEGIN
    exec ('delete from table ConcernedTable')
    exec ('delete from table b')
    exec ('delete from table c')
    exec ('delete from table d')
.
.   
.
    exec ('delete from table z')

    exec ('insert into ConcernedTable select * from ['+@LinkedServerName+'].['+@LinkedServerDatabase+'].[dbo].ConcernedTable')
    exec ('insert into b select * from ['+@LinkedServerName+'].['+@LinkedServerDatabase+'].[dbo].b')
    exec ('insert into c select * from ['+@LinkedServerName+'].['+@LinkedServerDatabase+'].[dbo].c')
    exec ('insert into d select * from ['+@LinkedServerName+'].['+@LinkedServerDatabase+'].[dbo].d')
.
.
    exec ('insert into z select * from ['+@LinkedServerName+'].['+@LinkedServerDatabase+'].[dbo].z')
END

I have a table (ConcernedTable) that has 100,000 rows on SQL Server 2012, but when I run the Exec statement to select from the SQL Server 2012 to the SQL Server 2000, it only inserts 12,768 rows.

I assumed my query had a bug, but it isn't the case. If I run the same Exec statement on a separate query window it inserts all the 100,000 rows. The even more weird thing is if I switch the position of the exec statement for my ConcernedTable as shown below it inserts all 100,000 rows.

Create Procedure CopyData(@LinkedServerName Varchar(10), @LinkedServerDatabase Varchar(20)) 
AS
BEGIN
    exec ('delete from table b')
    exec ('delete from table c')
    exec ('delete from table d')
.
.   
.
    exec ('delete from table z')
    exec ('delete from table ConcernedTable')


    exec ('insert into b select * from ['+@LinkedServerName+'].['+@LinkedServerDatabase+'].[dbo].b')
    exec ('insert into c select * from ['+@LinkedServerName+'].['+@LinkedServerDatabase+'].[dbo].c')
    exec ('insert into d select * from ['+@LinkedServerName+'].['+@LinkedServerDatabase+'].[dbo].d')
.
.   
.
    exec ('insert into z select * from ['+@LinkedServerName+'].['+@LinkedServerDatabase+'].[dbo].z')
    exec ('insert into ConcernedTable select * from ['+@LinkedServerName+'].['+@LinkedServerDatabase+'].[dbo].ConcernedTable')
END

The reason for making the Linkedserver name and Database name variables is there are multiple linked servers, thus did not want to create the same statement for each server.

Am I using the Exec statement incorrectly or is there something I need to do after the exec to ensure all rows are inserted before it moves to the next one?

share|improve this question
1  
The main question is: WHY are you using Exec at all?? Why not just have the INSERT or DELETE statements as such, in the procedure? What's the reason / point behind using EXEC for this?? – marc_s Jun 26 '13 at 11:07
    
marc is right here. I cant see why you are using EXEC when you have the insert statement there – Dev N00B Jun 26 '13 at 11:12
    
Well Actually the data is pulled from multiple Linked servers, thus the linked server name and the linked server database are dynamic variables. – Kush Jun 26 '13 at 11:16
    
You still don't need to use exec for this. You use exec to call a procedure. You are merely using a variable inside a query IN a procedure. – Alexandre P. Levasseur Jun 28 '13 at 16:18

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