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I have the following table

Table structure:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `people` ( 
`name` varchar(10) NOT NULL, 
`age` smallint(5) unsigned NOT NULL, 
PRIMARY KEY (`name`) 
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1; 

Insert some values:

INSERT INTO `people` (`name`, `age`) VALUES 
('bob', 13), 
('john', 25), 
('steve', 8), 
('sue', 13); 

Executed Query:

SELECT MAX(  `age` ) ,  `name` FROM  `people` WHERE 1

Expected Result:

25, John

Generated Result

25, bob

We can achieve this by using this query

SELECT `age`,  `name` FROM  `people` ORDER BY age DESC LIMIT 1

Question 1 : What I made mistake here and why this MAX function is not return the relevant row information?

Question 2: Which one is good to use, to increase performance MAX function or ORDER BY clause?

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For this trivial example, the answer is obviously ORDER BY. For the more complex problem - a so-called GROUPWISE MAX query, this is something of a FAQ, and myriad answers have already been provided. –  Strawberry Jun 26 '13 at 11:15

7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Question 1 : What I made mistake here and why this MAX function is not return the relevant row information?

You need to read up on the group by clause.

MySQL is being a lot more permissive than it should, introducing confusion in the process. Basically, any column without an aggregate should be included in the group by clause. But MySQL syntactic sugar allows to "forget" columns. When you do, MySQL spits out an arbitrary value from the set that it's grouping by. In your case, the first row in the set is bob, so it returns that.

Question 2: Which one is good to use, to increase performance MAX function or ORDER BY clause?

Your first statement (using max() without a group by) is simply incorrect.

If you want one of the oldest users, order by age desc limit 1 is the correct way to proceed.

If you want all of the oldest users, you need a subselect:

SELECT p.* FROM people p WHERE p.age = (select max(subp.age) from people subp);
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I agree which one is good to increase the performance, Order By clause or subquery –  Sundar Jun 26 '13 at 11:25
1  
Either -- they give different results. For performance, you'll want an index on age. –  Denis de Bernardy Jun 26 '13 at 11:33

What I made mistake here and why this MAX function is not return the relevant row information?

MAX is returning the correct value - but the other column you select just gives you a "random" value.

Selecting columns that are not part of the GROUPing (and I think implicit GROUP BY is done here since you use an aggregate function) is illegal in strict SQL - MySQL however ignores that (depending on server config), and gives you a value from a "random" row in such cases.


Alternative approaches are described here: The Rows Holding the Group-wise Maximum of a Certain Column

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try this

SELECT age, name FROM  `people` where age = (SELECT max(age) FROM  people)
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I agree your answer but which one is good to increase the performance, Order By clause or subquery –  Sundar Jun 26 '13 at 11:22
    
if you are using any index in your table then use Order by otherwise sub-query is better then Order by clause Thank You –  Napster Jun 26 '13 at 11:42

Yet another solution with no use of agregate functions and groupings:

SELECT * FROM people ORDER BY age DESC LIMIT 1

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MAX is an aggregate function. That means MySQL groups all of the records and treats them as if they were one in the result set. Since you doesn't state how the name column is to be grouped, the result of that may be unexpected. ORDER BY is a perfectly fine way to achieve the desired result. Just don't forget to add an index on age so the performance isn't affected as the table grows.

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Question 1 : If you really want to use the MAX() you could try this SELECT age, name FROM people WHERE age IN (SELECT MAX(age) FROM people);

Question 2: I think it depends, for my suggestion in question 1, you do the query twice, but in the ORDER BY solution you provided, the database performed a sort like procedure.

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There is an interesting alternative that works only on MySql!

SELECT `Name`, `Age` FROM 
(SELECT `Name`, `Age`, 1 AS `foo`
FROM `People`
ORDER BY `Age` DESC) AS `x`
GROUP BY `foo`

This works because MySql returns the first row, when no aggregation function is applied on a given column

Here is the link: http://tominology.blogspot.com.br/2014/10/sql-row-with-max-value.html

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