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I'm using C++11. I encountered a compilation error when writing a simple wrapper for std::queue<T>, and using it with a class that does not have a copy constructor.

Following is a snippet to illustrate the problem.

Basically, I have a wrapper for std::queue<T>, which has two virtual overloads for push.

#include <queue>
#include <utility>
#include <future>

template <typename T>
class myqueue {
public:
    myqueue() : q() {}
    virtual ~myqueue() {}

    // pushes a copy
    virtual void push(const T& item) {
        q.push(item);
    }
    // pushes the object itself (move)
    virtual void push(T&& item) {
        q.push(std::move(item));
    }
private:
    std::queue<T> q;
};

int main() {
    // Thanks to Yakk for pointing out that I can reduce clutter by using one of std's non-copyable classes!
    myqueue<std::packaged_task<int()>> q;
    std::packaged_task<int()> t([]{return 42;});
    q.push(std::move(t));
}

When I try to compile this (ICC 13.2, g++ 4.7.3 on my Linux machine here, and also g++ 4.7.2 on Ideone: http://ideone.com/HwBhIX ), the compiler complains that it cannot instantiate myqueue::push(const nocopy&) because nocopy's copy constructor is deleted.

If I remove the virtual modifiers from push, this compiles fine (both on my machine and on Ideone).

Can anyone help me understand why this is happening?


P.S.: here is the error stack from Ideone:

In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.7/i486-linux-gnu/bits/c++allocator.h:34:0,
                 from /usr/include/c++/4.7/bits/allocator.h:48,
                 from /usr/include/c++/4.7/deque:62,
                 from /usr/include/c++/4.7/queue:61,
                 from prog.cpp:1:
/usr/include/c++/4.7/ext/new_allocator.h: In instantiation of ‘void __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<_Tp>::construct(_Up*, _Args&& ...) [with _Up = std::packaged_task<int()>; _Args = {const std::packaged_task<int()>&}; _Tp = std::packaged_task<int()>]’:
/usr/include/c++/4.7/bits/stl_deque.h:1376:6:   required from ‘void std::deque<_Tp, _Alloc>::push_back(const value_type&) [with _Tp = std::packaged_task<int()>; _Alloc = std::allocator<std::packaged_task<int()> >; std::deque<_Tp, _Alloc>::value_type = std::packaged_task<int()>]’
/usr/include/c++/4.7/bits/stl_queue.h:212:9:   required from ‘void std::queue<_Tp, _Sequence>::push(const value_type&) [with _Tp = std::packaged_task<int()>; _Sequence = std::deque<std::packaged_task<int()>, std::allocator<std::packaged_task<int()> > >; std::queue<_Tp, _Sequence>::value_type = std::packaged_task<int()>]’
prog.cpp:13:9:   required from ‘void myqueue<T>::push(const T&) [with T = std::packaged_task<int()>]’
prog.cpp:28:1:   required from here
/usr/include/c++/4.7/ext/new_allocator.h:110:4: error: use of deleted function ‘std::packaged_task<_Res(_ArgTypes ...)>::packaged_task(const std::packaged_task<_Res(_ArgTypes ...)>&) [with _Res = int; _ArgTypes = {}; std::packaged_task<_Res(_ArgTypes ...)> = std::packaged_task<int()>]’
In file included from prog.cpp:3:0:
/usr/include/c++/4.7/future:1337:7: error: declared here
share|improve this question
1  
gcc 4.7.2 compiles this fine: ideone.com/NPUkaS –  Arne Mertz Jun 26 '13 at 12:33
4  
g++ 4.8 compiled it all without problem. clang++ 3.4 too. –  Massa Jun 26 '13 at 12:33
1  
_of course_, after I put the missing semicolon in nocopy.h (at the end, after the class definition) –  Massa Jun 26 '13 at 12:34
1  
g++-4.7 (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.7.3-2ubuntu4) 4.7.3 still compiles it just fine. I just copied the text from here and pasted into the files. –  Massa Jun 26 '13 at 12:49
2  
@MichaelKuritzky please don't copy-type the code you have, that's obviously too risky to introduce errors (and to erase the reason for your real problem). If you don't have internet access on the computer, copy the code onto an usb pen drive and upload it from there. –  Arne Mertz Jun 26 '13 at 12:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This occurs because the c++11 implementation provided by gcc 4.7 is incomplete. When using c++11 you must always use the most up-to-date compiler versions. clang is usually most complete, followed by gcc and, some distance behind, icpc.


Following your edit, the code is not compiling any more (clang 3.2 or gcc 4.8), because it's simply wrong. When the template class myqueue<std::packaged_task<int()>> is instantiated, the non-template member virtual void push(const T&) is instantiated too. However this member calls the deleted copy constructor of T, so is illegal, error. (That it compiles for non-virtual push(const T&) is dangerous, as you will get an error as soon as you try to use that function.)

To make you code work, you must avoid that. A virtual member cannot be a template (which would have allowed you to avoid the problem via SFINAE). But you can specialise class myqueue<T> depending on whether T is copyable or not. The following code compiles with gcc 4.8 (but not with icpc 13 or clang 3.2, which has a faulty implementation of std::is_copy_constructible).

#include <queue>
#include <type_traits>
#include <utility>
#include <future>

template <typename T, typename E=void> class myqueue;

template <typename T>
class myqueue<T, typename std::enable_if<std::is_copy_constructible<T>::value>::type>
{
  std::queue<T> q;
public:
  virtual ~myqueue() {}
  // pushes a copy
  virtual void push(const T& item) { q.push(item); }
  // pushes the object itself (move)
  virtual void push(T&& item) { q.push(std::move(item)); }
};

template <typename T>
class myqueue<T,typename std::enable_if<!std::is_copy_constructible<T>::value>::type>
{
  std::queue<T> q;
public:
  virtual ~myqueue() {}
  // pushes the object itself (move)
  virtual void push(T&& item) { q.push(std::move(item)); }
};

int main() {
  std::packaged_task<int()> t([]{return 42;});
  myqueue<std::packaged_task<int()>> q;
  q.push(std::move(t));
} 

Of course, this is not quite the same as your original code, as there will be no virtual void push(const&T) for non-copyable T, but I think this is exactly what you want. Alternatively, you could make the offending method pure virtual in the specialisation for non-copyable T.

Sorry, that I cannot fix icpc for you, but at least this code seems to be legal C++11.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with this is that I have to use icpc, and g++ 4.7 is (from what I gather) the latest version (of the headers) they currently support. :( We'll switch to g++ 4.8's headers as soon as icpc adds support for them... –  Michael Kuritzky Jun 26 '13 at 12:46
    
@MichaelKuritzky icpc is not ready for C++11 (yet). Using icpc with C++11 was a bad decision. Best is to use clang. (I don't know why Intel is so bad at implementing C++11, they must prioritise other things.) –  Walter Jun 28 '13 at 11:54
    
the reason we chose icpc is its performance, not its C++11 support. Anyway, the C++11 support there is quite good so far (albeit still not full :( ), and improving with each update. –  Michael Kuritzky Jun 30 '13 at 6:31
    
Thanks for the answer, this seems to be the problem indeed. By the way, shouldn't it be possible to hide the methods (using SFINAE) without specializing the class, but rather on a per-method basis? (once icpc updates their erroneous implementation of std::is_copy_constructible, of course) –  Michael Kuritzky Jun 30 '13 at 6:35
    
@MichaelKuritzky No, you cannot use SFINAE (as I explained), because a virtual member cannot be a template. If speed is important, then consider clang: I found this to be quite fast, competetive with icpc (though this always depends on the code). –  Walter Jul 2 '13 at 12:56

myqueue's standard copy constructor calls the copy constructor of nocopy. Simply overwrite or =delete the copy-constructor and the operator= of myqueue and you should be fine.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, this doesn't work :( I tried deleteing the copy c'tor and operator=, but the problem persists. (in fact, they were deleted in the original classes from which I derived this snippet) –  Michael Kuritzky Jun 26 '13 at 12:50
    
Did you try the 'old' way of preventing unwanted copies by declaring the copy and assignment operator private? –  Marius Jun 26 '13 at 12:53
    
Just gave it a shot. Now it complains that the copy c'tor is private... :( –  Michael Kuritzky Jun 26 '13 at 12:59
    
@MichaelKuritzky then the code you posted is not the code you actually have (or the compiler actually tries to compile, to be precise), because there you don't copy any myqueue (it compiles fine with delete copy ctor, see here: ideone.com/hLV2kl). Please provide your actual main.cpp –  Arne Mertz Jun 26 '13 at 13:02
    
@ArneMertz - I did provide the original. As I said, deleteing the copy c'tor of myqueue didn't help. I guess my gcc/icpc installation is somehow faulty :( –  Michael Kuritzky Jun 26 '13 at 13:23

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