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I have a vector that looks something like this:

c(0.5,0,0,0,0,0.7,0,0,0,0,0.4,0,0,0,0)

Suppose I want to copy the values on positions 1, 6 and 11 (the ones that are not 0) to the four positions following that specific value, to make the vector look like this:

c(0.5,0.5,0.5,0.5,0.5,0.7,0.7,0.7,0.7,0.7,0.4,0.4,0.4,0.4,0.4)

How could I best do that in R?

Many thanks!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd probably loop through every single element greater 0 using lapply, then apply rep function to repeat each of these values 5 times and merge the resulting list entries via do.call("c", ...).

do.call("c", lapply(which(tmp > 0), function(i) rep(tmp[i], 5)))
[1] 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4
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Thanks, works perfectly. I'm trying to understand this. Is it correct that you now tell R to repeat the values that are > 0 to the position of that specific value and the next four positions? –  Rob Jun 26 '13 at 12:55
    
Exactly. You can control the number of repetitions within the rep function (set to 5 by now). –  fdetsch Jun 26 '13 at 12:57
1  
-1 because it requires the user to set the number of repetitions and cannot deal with unequal numbers of zeros. –  Roland Jun 26 '13 at 13:27
    
@Roland, you're definitely right. My line of code is tailored to this specific example where every element larger than 0 has to be repeated five times. As you see below, there are more flexible solutions than that! –  fdetsch Jun 26 '13 at 15:53

Here's another base R approach. Initial zeros are left as is:

v = c(0,1,2,-2.1,0,3,0,0.4,0,0)
v[v!=0] = diff(c(0, v[v!=0]))
cumsum(v)
# [1]  0.0  1.0  2.0 -2.1 -2.1  3.0  3.0  0.4  0.4  0.4

And here are some benchmarks:

roland = function(v) {v[v == 0] <- NA; na.locf(v)}
mp = function(x) {with(rle(x), rep(replace(values, values==0, values[which(values == 0)-1]), lengths))}
quant = function(dat) {not.0 <- (dat != 0); approx(which(not.0), dat[not.0], xout = seq(along.with = dat), method = "constant", rule = 2)}
eddi = function(v) {v[v!=0] = diff(c(0, v[v!=0])); cumsum(v)}

v = sample(c(-10:10, 0), 1e6, TRUE)
microbenchmark(roland(v), mp(v), quant(v), eddi(v), times = 10)
#Unit: milliseconds
#      expr      min       lq   median       uq      max neval
# roland(v) 595.1630 625.7692 638.4395 650.4758 664.9224    10
#     mp(v) 410.8224 433.6775 469.9346 496.6328 528.3218    10
#  quant(v) 646.1775 753.0684 759.9805 838.4281 883.3383    10
#   eddi(v) 265.8064 286.2922 316.7022 339.0333 354.0836    10
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It'd be interesting to see the benchmarks after scaling up a bit too. –  Thell Jun 27 '13 at 1:09
    
@Thell how much bigger than 1e6 do you want to go? :) –  eddi Jun 27 '13 at 3:17
    
Ha! How did I miss that! :P –  Thell Jun 27 '13 at 3:28

Here's one way:

zero.locf <- function(x) {
    if (x[1] == 0) stop('x[1] should not be 0')
    with(rle(x), {
        no.0 <- replace(values, values == 0, values[(values == 0) - 1])
        rep(no.0, lengths)
    })
}
x <- c(0.5,0,0,0,0,0.7,0,0,0,0,0.4,0,0,0,0)
zero.locf(x)
#  [1] 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4

rle(x) returns a list with items values and lengths.

rle(x)
Run Length Encoding
  lengths: int [1:6] 1 4 1 4 1 4
  values : num [1:6] 0.5 0 0.7 0 0.4 0

with opens up this list and lets us reference these entries directly.

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Thanks for the explanation, this also works perfectly. –  Rob Jun 26 '13 at 13:01
    
this does smth weird when there are 0's in the beginning (not really sure what it does as I didn't read the solution very carefully) –  eddi Jun 26 '13 at 22:57
    
also I get warnings when running this for: set.seed(1); v = sample(c(-10:10, rep(0, 10000)), 1e5, T) –  eddi Jun 26 '13 at 23:00
    
@eddi thanks, fixed. –  Matthew Plourde Jun 27 '13 at 2:19

Here is an alternative using approx

dat   <- c(0.5,0,0,0,0,0.7,0,0,0,0,0.4,0,0,0,0)
not.0 <- (dat != 0)
approx(which(not.0), dat[not.0], xout = seq(along.with = dat), method = "constant", yleft = 0, rule = 1:2)
# $x
# [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12 13 14 15
#
# $y
# [1] 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4

And here is an alternative that relies on the stated structure of the initial vector (repetitions of a non-zero value followed by 4 zeros). It adresses the speed issue but at the cost of flexibility.

dat <- c(0.5,0,0,0,0,0.7,0,0,0,0,0.4,0,0,0,0)
rep(dat[seq(1, length(dat), by = 5)], each = 5)
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I think this fills in the first element to the left if the vector starts with 0's –  eddi Jun 26 '13 at 22:58
    
@eddi Yes. I've made relevant changes to leave potential initial zero(s) unchanged. –  QuantIbex Jun 26 '13 at 23:58

Another possibility:

vec <- c(0.5,0,0,0,0,0.7,0,0,0,0,0.4,0,0,0,0)

library(zoo)
vec[vec==0] <- NA
na.locf(vec)
#[1] 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4
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note that this cuts out initial zero's –  eddi Jun 26 '13 at 22:56
    
@eddi, just set na.locf(vec,na.rm=T). –  Thell Jun 27 '13 at 1:03
    
@Thell I assume you mean na.rm=F –  eddi Jun 27 '13 at 3:16
    
Yep... that's what I get for commenting right as dinner is being served. –  Thell Jun 27 '13 at 3:30

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