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I want to connect Oracle DB with same user several time at the same time on java app. Is there any limitations? I want to connect db and read bulk data from same user.

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What exactly are you trying to do with the data you want to pull to your client? Do you really need the rows or do you need an aggregation of the data? The Oracle database can do a lot for you... – ik_zelf Jun 26 '13 at 13:11
up vote 3 down vote accepted

In general there are not unless there is a limit specifically configured through the user profile, which can limit sessions_per_user.

http://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14200/statements_6010.htm

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thanks for reply, But when I want to read data is there any limitations?(I connect db with A user and read Table from A user) – Ersin Gülbahar Jun 26 '13 at 13:04
    
There is no issue of the two session getting confused about which data they see, if that's what you mean. Every session only sees data that was committed by other sessions at the time the query began (lookup "read consistency") – David Aldridge Jun 26 '13 at 13:30

The number of sessions is limited by the "sessions" configuration parameter of the database instance. According to the Oracle documentation the default value is (1.5 * PROCESSES) + 22.

See also http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e25513/initparams232.htm#REFRN10197

Other related parameters are "processes" and "transactions".

In general it's not a problem to open several connection in an application to the same database user/schema at the same time. This is what application servers like JBoss are doing all the time.

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