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Let's say I have:

function myFunk(param1) {
    if (param1) {
            // do stuff
    } 
}

and I alter this to ...

function myFunk(param1, param2) {
    if (param2) {
            // do stuff
    }
}

param2 can only ever be true or false. Is this safe?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by dystroy, deceze, Oleg V. Volkov, Joe Frambach, Qantas 94 Heavy Mar 2 at 1:08

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
What do you mean by "safe" ? –  dystroy Jun 26 '13 at 12:53
2  
And what do you mean with "overload" ? You're changing the function, not overloading it. –  dystroy Jun 26 '13 at 12:54
    
4  
Well that will work but its not overloading its replacing one function with another. –  Saint Gerbil Jun 26 '13 at 12:54
    
Functions can't be overloaded in JavaScript because the arguments are typeless. Also, you may define a function with say 2 args, but you can pass more/less than 2 args and it won't fail. So what you are doing is replacing the same function with a new definition. –  mohkhan Jun 26 '13 at 12:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
function myFunk(param1, param2) {
    if (param2) {
            // do stuff
    }
}

param2 can only ever be true or false.

No. It can have any value. If the function is called with only one argument (myFunk("something")), then the param2 will have the value undefined. Which is falsy (like null, "", 0 or NaN) of course, so as expected your if-statement will not be executed.

Is this safe?

It's the standard way to have optional arguments in JavaScript, yes. For further details see Function overloading in Javascript - Best practices

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In this case, I feel it would be more clear if you use function variable approach.

var myFunk = function(param1) {
    if (param1) {
            // do stuff
    } 
}

and I alter this to ...

myFunk = function(param1, param2) {
    if (param2) {
            // do stuff
    }
}

It is now very clear what is happening, and the previous version of function myFunc does not exist anywhere.

edit more info

If you call function(param1, param2) {} with only one parameter, then typeof param2 == "undefined" will return true. For example:

myFunk = function(param1, param2) {
    if (typeof param2 == "undefined") {
        // do stuff with only param1
    }
}
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you should use param2 === undefined rather than the string version of it. –  Saint Gerbil Jun 26 '13 at 13:01
    
No... typeof returns a string. This is safe for the case that undefined is redefined. –  Joe Frambach Jun 26 '13 at 13:02
    
which is why i dropped the typeof from my code. –  Saint Gerbil Jun 26 '13 at 13:03
    
That's a terrible reason to drop it. Using typeof is the accepted way to test for define-ness –  Joe Frambach Jun 26 '13 at 13:03
    

You cannot overload functions in javascript. you would be better checking the arguments or checking for undefined in order to see what the caller is trying to do. for example

function myFunk(param1, param2) {
    if (param2) {
            // do stuff
    }
}

myFunk(1); // if does not execute

myFunk(1, 2); // if executes

however if you pass a falsy value for the second param then the if will still not execute

myFunk(1,0);  // if does not execute
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Function overloading is not possible in javascript, if you made two same name function in same scope, always last function with that name will be called irrespective of number of parameters.

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Downvote ??? any reasons... –  Pranav Singh Jun 26 '13 at 13:08
    
I'd like to know as well, for my answer too. –  Joe Frambach Jun 26 '13 at 13:09
    
Well if someone asks that is not feasible in a language, you can only say that's not possible. Any further explanation is waste of time to be specific –  Pranav Singh Jun 26 '13 at 13:11
    
Yep I got randomly down-voted too. :-( –  Saint Gerbil Jul 12 '13 at 10:12

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