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I have a constant like this:

const int TEST1 = 3;

How can I correctly store it for later use like so?

int hhh = TEST1;

Reason for doing this is that I have 8 constants and I need to selet one of them depending on variable input.

I don't get any errors when doing it this way but if I later refer to the hhh variable it doesnt seem to have the correct value.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by R. Martinho Fernandes, Jonathan Wakely, DominicM, Henrik, Balog Pal Jun 26 '13 at 13:55

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
What you have there should work. Perhaps some other code is modifying hhh between when you assign it and when you use it? –  Eric Finn Jun 26 '13 at 13:30
2  
That is the correct way to store the constant in a variable; your issue, however, lies elsewhere, and we require code to solve it. –  trojanfoe Jun 26 '13 at 13:30
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You're not storing a reference to the constant. You're storing the value of the constant. You can still modify hhh because hhh is not constant...maybe I'm confused by what you are saying is the issue? –  crush Jun 26 '13 at 13:31
    
Will check my code and get back in a little while. –  DominicM Jun 26 '13 at 13:33
    
Why should it act like constant? –  rohit srivastava Jun 26 '13 at 13:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
const int TEST1 = 3;

Is the correct way to store a const. However if later you set a different variable to the TEST1

int iii = TEST1; //iii is not const, but TEST1 still is
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