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I have an object

class Obj:
    def method1(self):
        print 'method1'

    def method2(self):
        print 'method2'

    def method3(self):
        print 'method3'

and function

def do_something():
    obj = Obj()
    obj.method2()
    obj.method1()
    obj.method3()

And I want to write test which tests do_something and Obj object. How can I receive list of methods which was called on obj without replacing (mocking) and changing obj behavior?

Something like

['method2', 'method1', 'method3']
share|improve this question
    
(1) use a testing framework; (2) [getattr(obj,name)() for name namelist] – Marcin Jun 26 '13 at 15:48
    
Yes. I use testing framework, I just call do_something(). How can I get list of functions calls of obj object? – Rusty Robot Jun 26 '13 at 15:54
    
Is it within scope to define a generic wrapper class that each object could be wrapped with? Like obj = Obj() then x = Wrapper(obj) – Brian Jun 26 '13 at 15:57
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use the trace package. See docs: http://docs.python.org/2/library/trace.html

From the docs:

import sys
import trace

# create a Trace object, telling it what to ignore, and whether to
# do tracing or line-counting or both.
tracer = trace.Trace(
    ignoredirs=[sys.prefix, sys.exec_prefix],
    trace=0,
    count=1)

# run the new command using the given tracer
tracer.run('main()')

# make a report, placing output in the current directory
r = tracer.results()
r.write_results(show_missing=True, coverdir=".")
share|improve this answer
    
Can you show an example of how trace can be used to track calls for an individual object? It looks like what is needed might be there but I've never used trace and now I'm curious. – Brian Jun 26 '13 at 16:20
    
There is an example in the documentation. – Marcin Jun 26 '13 at 16:31
    
This doesn't differentiate between different instances of a particular class. – Brian Jun 26 '13 at 17:06

You can create a generic Wrapper class which will encapsulate your object and track changes to it.

class Obj:
    def method1(self):
        print 'method1'

    def method2(self):
        print 'method2'

    def method3(self):
        print 'method3'

class Wrapper:
    def __init__(self, wrapped):
        self.calls = []
        self._wrapped = wrapped
    def __getattr__(self, n):
        self.calls.append(n)
        return getattr(self._wrapped, n)

By redefining __getattr__ we cause all attribute accessing on the wrapper to retrieve the attribute in the wrapped object. With the above defined I can do the following:

>>> obj = Obj()
>>> x = Wrapper(obj)
>>> x.calls
[]
>>> x.method2()
method 2
>>> x.method1()
method 1
>>> x.method3()
method 3
>>> x.calls
['method2', 'method1', 'method3']
>>> x.method1()
method 1
>>> x.method1()
method 1
>>> x.calls
['method2', 'method1', 'method3', 'method1', 'method1']

You can further improve __getattr__ in Wrapper to fit your needs. (record timestamps for the method calls, record output, log to a database, etc.)

share|improve this answer
    
Why would you do this, when you can avoid altering your code at all? You just reimplemented standard functionality. – Marcin Jun 26 '13 at 16:12
    
Because it fits the needs described by OP, it's highly modular, and it's 7 lines of code... – Brian Jun 26 '13 at 16:15

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