Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have seen lots of codes to implement BST(online and in some books).Most of those code have a struct like below:-

struct node{
     int data;
     struct node *left;
     struct node *right;
};

class tree{
      private:
           node *root;
      public:
       //other helper function like insert,delete,display
};

But if i want to use OOPS in much better way then would it be correct to say that i should create class node{}; instead of using struct ???

I have written code below , which according to me is uses OOPS concept in much better way. please suggest me any changes if you find and problem with the design:-

my code :-

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class node{

    private:
        int data;
        node *left;
        node *right;
    public:
        node()
        {
            data=0;
            left=NULL;
            right=NULL;
        }
        node(int val)
        {
            data=val;
            left=NULL;
            right=NULL;
        }
        int getData()
        {
            return data;
        }

        node* getLeft()
        {
            return left;
        }
        node* getRight()
                {
                        return right;
                }
        void setData(int val)
        {
            data=val;
        }
        void setLeft(node *l)
        {
            left=l;
        }
        void setRight(node *r)
                {
                        right=r;
                }


};


class tree{
    private:
        node *root;
        node *insertHelper(node*,int);
        void inorderHelper(node*);
    public:
        tree()
        {
            root=NULL;
        }

        void insert(int val)
        {

            if(root==NULL)
            {
                root=new node(val);
                return;
            }
            insertHelper(root,val);
        }
        void inorder();


};

node *tree::insertHelper(node *root,int val)
{
    if(root==NULL)
    {
        root=new node(val);
        return root;
    }
        else
        {
        if(root->getData() > val)
                {
            root->setLeft(insertHelper(root->getLeft(),val));
                }
                else
        {
            root->setRight(insertHelper(root->getRight(),val));
        }
    }
}



void tree::inorder()
{
    if(root)
    {
        inorderHelper(root);
    }
}
void tree::inorderHelper(node *temp)
{
    if(temp!=NULL)
    {
        inorderHelper(temp->getLeft());
        cout<<temp->getData()<<" ";
        inorderHelper(temp->getRight());
    }
}

By creating class node{} and keeping left ,right,data as private member , am i doing too much and making things complicated or it is a good approach???

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

BSTs, while in some ways very complicated, are really very simple. What you're doing - setting everything private unless it absolutely needs to be otherwise - is good OOP convention, but isn't really necessary here. You have a single class - that means inheritance and polymorphism are irrelevant - which is used for basically a single, very straightforward purpose, which means that restricting access doesn't really do much (it's very improbable that your code will be used by someone else who decides to arbitrarily mess with fields that shouldn't be messed with).

You aren't losing any functionality by making your struct a class, but you aren't really gaining any, either. If, later on, you have even the hint of a plan to somehow use a modified BST of some sort, by all means use classes, because then inheritance will become relevant; but if not, there isn't much of a difference between class and struct, other than style.

share|improve this answer

Generally speaking, if the construct you are going to make is only holding data (and does not need to change or access the data directly), then you do not need a class. This is why, with a BST, a struct will suffice for the node when there is already a Tree class.

Why would a struct for the node suffice, though? Well, that comes down to the fact that you don't need to have the methods that you have provided in your "node" class for two reasons. Firstly, anything that the methods you have in your node class are accomplishing is somewhat unnecessary; the Tree class is already responsible for traversing the BST, adding new nodes, deleting unwanted nodes, and obtaining data (you typically do not want to have mutator functions that will change the values stored in the nodes after they have been added as this could result in a BST that does not adhere to the structure required for a BST). Secondly, as stated above, the node only needs to hold data. This introduces an important paradigm in C++ which is one of the key differences that sets it apart from other languages that have objects: it allows us to only make classes when they are absolutely necessary (in Java, for example, everything is a class!). Accordingly, we should take advantage of this and use structs when a class is not required. In my experience, having fewer classes will result in code that is easier to write and for others to understand.

Regarding making the member variables of the node struct private in the class you have defined: This is a good idea for data encapsulation and can prevent mishaps, but just try to be careful when you are programming the BST and you should be okay!

Hope this helps and good luck programming :)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.