Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

Oracle 11g documentation says that default date format is DD-MON-YYYY, which means that if I insert date to a date column using:

insert into table t values(1, '02-JAN-2013')

and then select it

select * from t

it should display as 02-JAN-2013 whereas in reality it displays date as 01/02/2013.

Why his discrepancy or am I missing something.

Ref. http://infolab.stanford.edu/~ullman/fcdb/oracle/or-time.html

FYI. I am using PL/SQL Developer for this experiment.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Ben, Alex Poole, APC, Mike, Nathan Hughes Jun 27 '13 at 16:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers 2

There isn't really a default date format for the product, the reference guide states that the default for NLS_DATE_FORMAT at system level is based on NLS_TERRITORY. Though this says the 'standard' is `DD-MON-RR', and I think that's what you get if you don't specify a value at database level, at least on the platforms I've worked on.

When you create a new database the initialisation parameters can include a specific NLS_DATE_FORMAT, and that can be changed later too.

But the system-level NLS_DATE_FORMAT can be overridden by the client, the session, or in a TO_CHAR call. You can look in v$nls_parameters to see the system value, and nls_session_parameters to see your current session value. You can change that with alter session if you want to.

I'm pretty sure you'll find that PL/SQL Developer is setting the session NLS_DATE_FORMAT to MM/DD/YYYY somewhere in its preferences.

Generally it's better to not rely on that value at all, and always use an explicit format mask for display, e.g. TO_CHAR(<column>, 'YYYY-MM-DD HH24:MI:SS').

There's more on NLS_DATE_FORMAT in the globalisation guide here and here; and a bit about date display here; and an overview of the date format model elements here

share|improve this answer
    
If this is the case then why I have to use specific format while comparision of dates: Eg. select si.effective_date from search_instance si where si.effective_date > '26-JUN-2013' order by si.effective_date . If instead of '26-JUN-2013' I use '06/26/2013' it will say 'Not a valid Month'. –  user204069 Jun 26 '13 at 17:51
1  
To answer your comment please read my answer here or here (I'm sure Alex has as many) @user204069... You're not comparing dates there, you're comparing strings. Always explicitly convert strings to a date for date comparisons. –  Ben Jun 26 '13 at 18:07
1  
@user204069 - what is your session value? You're doing an implicit conversion from a string to a date, which you should avoid as it's ambiguous. You should use to_date('06/26/2013', 'MM/DD/YYYY'). Or possibly date '2013-06-26', using an ANSI date literal. –  Alex Poole Jun 26 '13 at 18:07

It depends of NSL_DATE_FORMAT that depends of NLS_TERRITORY

Give a look to: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14237/initparams122.htm

share|improve this answer
    
If this is the case then why I have to use specific format while comparision of dates: Eg. select si.effective_date from search_instance si where si.effective_date > '26-JUN-2013' order by si.effective_date . If instead of '26-JUN-2013' I use '06/26/2013' it will say 'Not a valid Month'. –  user204069 Jun 26 '13 at 17:58
    
I try to use always the ansi date format: 'YYMMDDHHMISS' with this, i do not have to check what format the DB use. Then i can use something like si.effective_date > '20130626000000' –  Aguardientico Jun 26 '13 at 18:07

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.