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EDIT: Originally titled Mootools' child index refresh

It is a little bit difficult for me to REALLY be 100% sure what REALLY goes on beneath Mootools' bonnet, but here's how it seems to work:

When an element is detached from the DOM and then reinserted to the bottom of it's container, it seems that the next recurring getNext() or getChildren()[0] or the similar does not return the element the human thinks is first when he looks at the HTML.

Below is the code of what I want to do. I'm at a loss, and I'm not even sure if what I described above truly is the issue.

function slideNext() {
    window.clearTimeout(sliderTimeout);
    var slider = $('slider');
    slider.set('tween', {duration: 500, onComplete: function(){
        var slide = slider.getFirst('.block').clone();
        slider.grab(slide, 'bottom');
        slider.getFirst('.block').destroy();
        slider.erase('style');
        sliderTimeout = window.setTimeout(function(){slideNext();}, 5000);
    }});
    slider.tween('margin-left', 0 - slider.getSize().x);
}

EDIT: Putting an alert(slide.get('html')); inside the onComplete function clears some things up. Each time the function is run the number of alert dialogs rather strangely increments, even though it should alert only once. It seems to mean that by using slider.set('tween', {blabla}) recurrently results in a stacking tween, which made me think that there might be something wrong with child indexing, when apparently that is not the case. This variation works perfectly:

function slideNext() {
    window.clearTimeout(sliderTimeout);
    var slider = $('slider');
    var myFx = new Fx.Tween('slider', {
        duration: 500, 
        property: 'margin-left',
        onComplete: function(){
            var slide = slider.getFirst('.block').clone();
            slider.grab(slide, 'bottom');
            slider.getFirst('.block').destroy();
            slider.erase('style');
            sliderTimeout = window.setTimeout(function(){slideNext();}, 5000);
        }
    });
    myFx.start(0, 0 - slider.getSize().x);
}

Can somebody explain why that is?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

basically, in the original:

slider.set('tween', {duration: 500, onComplete: function(){
    var slide = slider.getFirst('.block').clone();
    slider.grab(slide, 'bottom');
    slider.getFirst('.block').destroy();
    slider.erase('style'); 
    sliderTimeout = window.setTimeout(function(){slideNext();}, 5000);
}});

you are calling the setter on the wteen instance, which detects the event prefixed by on-(Complete), extracts it and runs this.addEvent('complete', cb);. this does not replace the previous one, mootools has an event api with multiple callbacks, not a single static one.

one way to solve it is to detach the event before calling the next one, but this is silly as the event is the same. it makes far more sense to set the tween instance once instead. the element won't change. note i don't really know whta you use it for. seems a bit redundant but here goes: http://jsfiddle.net/dimitar/3qWX7/

(function(){
    // set the slider el cached, store the tween instance.
    var slider = document.id('slider').set('tween', {
        duration: 500,
        link: 'cancel',
        onComplete: function(){
            var block = this.element.getFirst('.block');
            // this.element === slider
            this.element.adopt(block.clone());
            block.destroy();
            this.element.erase('style'); // er? why... 
            // console.log(this.element);
            this.timer = slideNext.delay(5000, this);
        }
    });

    // you can get instance by doing:
    slider.get('tween'); // Fx.Tween instance

    function slideNext(){
        // this == Fx.Tween instance. 
        window.clearTimeout(this.timer);
        this.element.tween('margin-left', [0, this.element.getSize().x]);
    }

    slider.tween('margin-left', 40);
}());

downside to this is other tweens - the event is not linked to the property you tween. if you do, you'd have to use fx.morph and remove/add events as you go along.

tl;dr;: always re-use fx instances, references to dom etc - cached.

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