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Let's say there are multiple ways to do an action and each way is arbitrarily more efficient. I would like to spawn multiple threads to accomplish an action and see which one finishes first. How would I do this? I know that I would spawn multiple threads but the thread that finishes first would have to return a value to the main thread which would have to abort all running threads. This is for learning so I'd like to understand how to do this with threading and with the task library.

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i think WaitAny() can do the trick or for TPL you can use this –  Guru Stron Jun 26 '13 at 18:01
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/14726854/… - this is pretty much 90% of your question. –  Vivek Jun 26 '13 at 18:02
    
@Vivek Actually that question asks for more than this question. It asks for first result that matches some condition, which is more complicated than this. –  svick Jun 26 '13 at 18:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. Make all your alternative ways accept a CancellationToken.
  2. Create a CancellationTokenSource and invoke all the alternative ways as separate Tasks, passing in the Token both to the Tasks and to the executed methods.
  3. Use Task.WaitAny(tasks) or await Task.WhenAny(tasks) to wait for the fastest Task to complete. From the result of that call, you can get the result of the fastest Task.
  4. Cancel() the cancellation token to notify the remaining Tasks to stop as soon as it's convenient for them.
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How would I do this with normal threading? –  Eitan Jun 26 '13 at 19:10
    
@Eitan You mean using the Thread class? Why would you want to do that? Most of the time, TPL is much more convenient. –  svick Jun 26 '13 at 19:11
    
For my general knowledge but also if I have to use a 2.0 project –  Eitan Jun 26 '13 at 19:24

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