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Why does charindex returns a value other than 0 in SQL Server 2008 R2 in the following script?

--drop table #tmp
--go

create table #tmp (field1 nvarchar(50))
go
insert into #tmp values (N'Value 1')
go
insert into #tmp values (N'Value 2')
go
insert into #tmp values (N'Value 3')
go


DECLARE @i   INT;
DECLARE @c   NCHAR;
declare @nvc nvarchar(50) = N'Test Value';

SET @i = 128;


WHILE @i < 256
BEGIN
  SET @i = @i + 1;
  SET @c = nchar(@i);

  if exists (select 1 from #tmp t where charindex (@c, t.field1) > 0)
    print @c;
END

The output produced on my db instance (collation used: SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AS):

(1 row(s) affected)

(1 row(s) affected)

(1 row(s) affected)
²
³
¹
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The character '2' and 'superscript 2' both have the same unicode numeric value of 2 so I would assume that SQL server is treating them as equivalent values based on this component of the unicode character rather than just the way it looks.

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