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First of all, let me tell you that I'm super noob with C++. So, sorry if i'm asking something stupid, but i'm completely stuck.

I'm trying to port a little game engine i wrote in AS3 to C++ and I have started with the core Game class. It has to store the levels, to update and manage them, so I think pointers is the way to go.

The header looks like this:

#pragma once
#include "Level.h"

class Game
{
public:
    Level *level;
    Level *nextLevel;
    Game(void);
    virtual ~Game(void);
    virtual void begin();
    virtual void onEveryFrame();
private:
    void changeLevel();
};

And the compiler throws me two errors for every pointer declaration :

Error 1 error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before '*'

Error 2 error C4430: missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int

So, what am I doing wrong ? The error description doesn't looks too descriptive to me.

(I'm using VS Express 2012)

EDIT :

Sorry guys! Looks like is a circular dependency problem. Nothing to do with the pointers actually.

The "Level.h" was something like this:

#pragma once
#include "Game.h"

class Level
{
public:
    Game *game;
    Level(void);
    virtual ~Level(void);
    virtual void begin();
    virtual void onEveryFrame();
};

Sorry guys, noob error. :(

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4  
What does Level.h look like? On a side note, since you're just learning C++, let me tell you that pointers (especially raw pointers like you have here) are seldom "the way to go". –  Chad Jun 26 '13 at 18:44
2  
Don't use raw pointers if you just began with C++. –  Bartek Banachewicz Jun 26 '13 at 18:45
    
+1 for fast learning :-))). @Bartek I disagree with "don't use raw pointers" advice - it's C/C++ - you must learn! Yes, they are dangerous but its very expensive to avoid them in low level languages like C/C++. Should I avoid index [] and new operator in C++ too? ;-). –  Roman Nikitchenko Jun 26 '13 at 20:07
    
@Bartek But your warning is quite useful to take additional care on pointers. –  Roman Nikitchenko Jun 26 '13 at 20:08
    
@RomanNikitchenko How exactly expensive is raw pointer compared to unique_ptr? Also C and C++ are two different languages; in C pointers are used all over the code and it's the main reason it shouldn't be used in anything that doesn't require absolutely maximum speed. If you mean op[] for, for example, vector, then yes, prefer iterators to integer indices. new is OTOH often unnecessary, after move semantics were introduced and you can keep the speed when passing as value/returning by value. –  Bartek Banachewicz Jun 26 '13 at 21:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. Your Level.h is definitely expected to declare Level type (most probably class) but it has some issue which prevents Level type to be declared. Check it or publish here.
  2. Your Game.h header actually doesn't need to know about Level type details. If your Level.h header is expected to declare Level as class you are enough to have class Level; declaration in your Game.h header. This is enough to use pointers. Of course if you try to manipulate objects of type Level you need to see its interface. So you definitely need Level.h inclusion in module implementing Game class.

Update:
I have noticed your edit, circular dependency are resolved exactly with declarations I mentioned in [2]. In addition they lower project garbage and build complexity. This is widely used technique in C / C++ (in C it is usually struct or something similar). The idea is to declare just 'it is type' everywhere you don't need actual object size or detailed interface.

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Thanks for your answer Roman. Very helpful to understand the issue. –  Hyaku Jun 26 '13 at 20:16

You have a circular dependency, so whichever header file you include one of the two classes is going to need a forward declaration of the other when the compiler hasn't yet had any information about what type "Level" or "Game" is going to be.

The solution is a simple forward delcaration.

#pragma once
#include "Level.h"

class Level;

class Game
{
public:
    Level *level;
    Level *nextLevel;
    Game(void);
    virtual ~Game(void);
    virtual void begin();
    virtual void onEveryFrame();
private:
    void changeLevel();
};

and do the reciprocal forward-declaration of Game in the Level header.

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Your compiler doesn't recognize the type Level. Maybe an include/typo error?

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