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I have been given an assignment: there's a static webpage that contains information that has been manually written in the view. I'm supposed to move that info into a database so we can clear out the view. My problem is that I don't know how to print that information in the exact same format the page currently has.

What I'm trying to do is write a method that returns information like this (original format example):

<strong>Category1</strong>
<ul class="square_list">
<li>Item1</li>
<li>Item2</li>
 #...etc
</ul>

<strong>Category2</strong>
<ul class="square_list">
<li>Item1</li>
<li>Item2</li>
 #...etc
</ul>

#...etc

The closest I'm able to get with my own limited knowledge is this:

<% Bus.find(10).amenities.each do | amenity | %>
    <strong><%= amenity.category %></strong>
    <ul class="square_list">
    <li><%= amenity.item %></li>
    </ul>
<% end %>

Which prints out the category name above each instance of an item. Is there a way to make an each block do what I want it to or is there another method I ought to be using?

As requested, model info:

class Bus < ActiveRecord::Base
has_many :bus_amenities
has_many :amenities, :through => :bus_amenities

class BusAmenity < ActiveRecord::Base
belongs_to :bus
belongs_to :amenity

class Amenity < ActiveRecord::Base
has_many :bus_amenities
has_many :buses, :through => :bus_amenities

Amenity(category: string, item: string) BusAmenity just acts as a go-between for Buses and Amenities.

This app uses Rails 3.0.19 and Ruby 1.9.3p327.

If I haven't provided enough information let me know please.

share|improve this question
    
Please provide more info. Like the relation b/w Bus, Amenity and item. –  ejo Jun 26 '13 at 19:32
    
Edited original post, will add even more if requested! –  Ryan Clark Jun 26 '13 at 19:44

2 Answers 2

What you have looks perfectly workable, except that your amenity has a singular item. If instead it's a collection of items then your template can be modified slightly to match the original:

<% Bus.find(10).amenities.each do | amenity | %>
    <strong><%= amenity.category %></strong>
    <ul class="square_list">
    <% amenity.items.each do |item| %>
      <li><%= item %></li>
    <% end %>
    </ul>   
<% end %>
share|improve this answer
    
I'm getting back a undefined method 'items error with this. –  Ryan Clark Jun 26 '13 at 20:10
    
@RyanClark, if there aren't already multiple items associated with an amenity then you either need to add that association, or find some other way to associate each category with multiple items. –  Mori Jun 26 '13 at 20:15
    
Do you mean that I should try splitting off items into a separate table? Thanks for your advice! –  Ryan Clark Jun 26 '13 at 20:18
    
@RyanClark, yes, the ordinary way to handle a one-to-many relationship is to normalize the attributes into separate tables. Then in Rails, Amenity has_many :items and AmenityItem belongs_to :amenity. –  Mori Jun 26 '13 at 21:20

I found a solution that does what I wanted, but it seems pretty lousy. I'm sure there's a better solution out there.

So this does what I want, but it seems so wordy to have to write an each block out for every category.

<strong>Category1</strong>
 <% Bus.find(10).amenities.find(:all, :conditions => {:category => "category1" }).each do | amenity | %>
  <ul class="square_list">
   <li><%= amenity.item %></li>
  </ul>
 <% end %>

<strong>Category2</strong>
 <% Bus.find(10).amenities.find(:all, :conditions => {:category => "category2" }).each do | amenity | %>  
  <ul class="square_list">
   <li><%= amenity.item %></li>
  </ul>
 <% end %>
share|improve this answer

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