Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to understand the affect of inheritance order in C++.. I looked online, but I couldn't find a clear and sufficient answer...

So, for the sake of the question, assume there are 2 classes: class B and class C.

Now, define:

class A1 : public B, public C{ ... };
class A2 : public C, public B{ ... };

What is the difference between A1 and A2?

Thanks a lot!

share|improve this question
    
Intersting question. I would like to know the answer. I found this link - publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/comphelp/v8v101/… , which claims, "The order of derivation is relevant only to determine the order of default initialization by constructors and cleanup by destructors." Maybe someone can confirm this? – OldProgrammer Jun 26 '13 at 19:40
up vote 11 down vote accepted

The order of derivation is relevant only to determine the order of default initialization by constructors and cleanup by destructors.

The order of derivation is not significant except as specified by the semantics of initialization by constructor (12.6.2), cleanup (12.4), and storage layout (9.2, 11.1). — end note ]" (§10.1/2)

From IBM's C++ documentation: Multiple inheritance

share|improve this answer
1  
Your answer would be better if you were to put the quote directly instead of having the link. – Mohammad Ali Baydoun Jun 26 '13 at 19:38
1  
Quote is there directly? Or am I missing something? – Grimm Jun 26 '13 at 19:39
    
True, but raw links are tacky :/ – Mohammad Ali Baydoun Jun 26 '13 at 19:42
    
Yes true. Not sure how to style it. Pretty new here but I will try something – Grimm Jun 26 '13 at 19:43
5  
Glad to help. Here's a quote from the standard: "[ Note: The order of derivation is not significant except as specified by the semantics of initialization by constructor (12.6.2), cleanup (12.4), and storage layout (9.2, 11.1). — end note ]" (§10.1/2) - the IBM docs miss the part about layout. (You can edit that into your post too if you wish.) – Mat Jun 26 '13 at 19:46

The C++11 Standard says (§10.1):

The order of derivation is not significant except as specified by the semantics of initialization by constructor (12.6.2), cleanup (12.4), and storage layout (9.2, 11.1).

The three referenced paragraphs reveal that

  • Constructors are called in the order you write them down (first base class in the list is constructed first) (§12.6.2.10). Different rules apply to virtual base classes which are always constructed from the most-derived class before any direct base classes.
  • Destructors are called in the inverse order of construction (first base class in the list is destructed last)
  • Storage layout is unspecified. You must not make any assumptions about the class layout in memory. The only exception are so called standard-layout classes (§9), which is basically a C-style struct. But since those are not allowed to have more than one class with non-static members in the class hierarchy, the question does not really apply here.
share|improve this answer
1  
I don't "consider" anything. "implementation defined" was defined in the C89 ANSI standard, and the same definition is used in C++. Only things that the standard describe as "implementation defined" are considered "implementation defined": if something is "implementation defined", then the implementation is required to document it. The implementation is of course allowed to also document anything it wants. It may describe the order of evaluation of operator + arguments, but that is not required. It may document the layout of the vtable, but that is not required. – curiousguy Jul 7 '13 at 23:43
    
"it is the implement's responsibility to determine the layout" the implementation must also choose one order of evaluation out of two possibilities every time you write f(g(),h()), but the way it chooses one is rarely described. The implementation is responsible for many things which are not documented except in the source code. – curiousguy Jul 7 '13 at 23:45
    
@curiousguy Which is exactly what the answer was trying to express: You must not make any assumptions about the class layout. The term implementation-defined here suffers from slightly different meanings in ISO-speak and in colloquial speech (which is the case for many terms used in the standard). To avoid this source of confusion I changed the wording of the answer. We could have done this in a lot less posts if your original post already contained the information from your second-to-last one. Thanks for staying with me though. – ComicSansMS Jul 8 '13 at 7:07
    
I am sorry, but did not realize that you were not using "implementation defined" in the C++ std sense, until late in our exchange. – curiousguy Jul 8 '13 at 10:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.