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This is a two part question:

1) Is it possible to retrieve the name of the partition that data lives in using a select statement, based on its ROWID or some other identifier?

eg.

SELECT DATA_ID, CATEGORY, VALUE, **PARTITION_NAME**
FROM MYTABLE
WHERE CATEGORY = 'ABC'

2) Is it possible to truncate a single partition of a table, without deleting the data stored in the other partitions?

I have a table with over a billion rows, hash partitioned by category. Only a handful of the categories have problems with their data, so it does not make sense to recreate the entire table, but deleting data from the table, even with all constraints inactive, is taking far too long.

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What do you mean by "problems with their data"? –  APC Jun 26 '13 at 21:15
    
@APC: I mean that some of the data is incorrect/outdated and needs to be replaced. –  willOEM Jun 27 '13 at 3:54
    
Maybe you can exchange one affected partition into a table, fix or recreate the data and then exchange it back? (docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e26088/…) –  wolφi Jun 27 '13 at 7:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Thanks to your hint about the rowid, I found a solution. If you have the rowid, it should be possible to determine the object the row belongs to.

A minimal example with 4 hash partitions:

CREATE TABLE pt (i NUMBER)
 PARTITION BY HASH (i) (PARTITION pt1, PARTITION pt2, PARTITION pt3, PARTITION pt4);

INSERT INTO pt SELECT ROWNUM FROM all_objects WHERE ROWNUM < 20;

Now, each row has a ROWID. You can find out the object number via DBMS_ROWID.ROWID_OBJECT. The dictionary table USER_OBJECTS has then the object_name (= the name of the table) and the subobject_name (= the name of the partition):

SELECT i, 
       ROWID AS row_id, 
       dbms_rowid.rowid_object(ROWID) AS object_no,
       (SELECT subobject_name 
          FROM user_objects 
         WHERE object_id = dbms_rowid.rowid_object(pt.ROWID)) AS partition_name
  FROM pt
 ORDER BY 3;

I   ROW_ID              OBJECT_NO PARTITION_NAME
6   AAALrYAAEAAAATRAAA  47832   PT1
11  AAALrYAAEAAAATRAAB  47832   PT1
13  AAALrYAAEAAAATRAAC  47832   PT1
9   AAALrZAAEAAAATZAAA  47833   PT2
10  AAALrZAAEAAAATZAAB  47833   PT2
12  AAALrZAAEAAAATZAAC  47833   PT2
17  AAALrZAAEAAAATZAAD  47833   PT2
19  AAALrZAAEAAAATZAAE  47833   PT2
2   AAALraAAEAAAAThAAA  47834   PT3
5   AAALraAAEAAAAThAAB  47834   PT3
18  AAALraAAEAAAAThAAD  47834   PT3
8   AAALraAAEAAAAThAAC  47834   PT3
1   AAALrbAAEAAAATpAAA  47835   PT4
3   AAALrbAAEAAAATpAAB  47835   PT4
4   AAALrbAAEAAAATpAAC  47835   PT4
7   AAALrbAAEAAAATpAAD  47835   PT4
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Great answer! That definitely fits the bill for the first part of my question! –  willOEM Jul 1 '13 at 17:53
    
Thanks! I'd used it only for probing around. To truncate or alter partitions, I'd use the PARTITION FOR syntax from @jonearls answer... –  wolφi Jul 1 '13 at 18:01

1) no. you cannot do that, you will have to query all_tab_partitions to find out the partition for a ceratain value.

2) alter table x truncate partition y

share|improve this answer
    
Can you clarify how I would use the all_tab_partitions table to find out what partition a particular row of data belongs to? –  willOEM Jun 26 '13 at 20:06
    
depends on the type of partition you are using (i'm guessing range). the high value of each partition is in the column high_value so if it's a range partition you need the last partition that your value is less then high_value. read the docs here –  haki Jun 26 '13 at 20:09
    
The table in question is hash partitioned by category, so the high_value column is null. –  willOEM Jun 26 '13 at 20:18
    
if it's hash partition, as far as i know, you cant know which partition oracle will put it in. –  haki Jun 26 '13 at 20:19
1  
No. It is DDL and hence committed implicitly. If you change your mind you'll need to use flashback query. –  APC Jun 26 '13 at 21:14

Instead of finding the partition name, use the value in the PARTITION FOR syntax:

ALTER TABLE MYTABLE TRUNCATE PARTITION FOR ('ABC');

Although this operation will not affect the data in other partitions it may make your indexes UNUSABLE. Either rebuild the relevant indexes or use UPDATE INDEXES in the DDL.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain the syntax a little here? I am assuming that 'ABC' is a value of CATEGORY, as in my example, but how does this statement know that 'ABC' refers to the CATEGORY column? –  willOEM Jul 1 '13 at 17:41
1  
It's the partition key, in other words the column (or columns) used to partition the table. –  wolφi Jul 1 '13 at 17:59

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