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I have the following line of code in C#:

ulong res = (1<<(1<<n))-1;

for some integer n.

As long as n is lower than 5, I get the correct answer. However, for n>=5, it does not work.

Any idea, using bitwise operators, how to get the correct answer even for n=5 and n=6? For n=6, the result should be ~0UL, and for n=5, the result should be 0xFFFFFFFF.

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Define "it does not work" please –  tnw Jun 26 '13 at 20:21
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(Note that your code doesn't even compile, by the way - there's no implicit conversion from int to ulong.) –  Jon Skeet Jun 26 '13 at 20:26
    
Indeed, my final version was (1UL(<<1<<n))-1, which actually works for n=5 but not for n=6. Jon Skeet gave the explanation I was looking for. –  user1448926 Jun 26 '13 at 20:40
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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

As long as n is lower than 5, I get the correct answer. However, for n>=5, it does not work.

Well, it obeys the specification. From section 7.9 of the C# 5 spec:

The << operator shifts x left by a number of bits computed as described below.

For the predefined operators, the number of bits to shift is computed as follows:

  • When the type of x is int or uint, the shift count is given by the low-order five bits of count. In other words, the shift count is computed from count & 0x1F.

So when n is 5, 1 << n (the inner shift) is 32. So you've then got effectively:

int x = 32;
ulong res = (1 << x) - 1;

Now 32 & 0x1f is 0... hence you have (1 << 0) - 1 which is 0.

Now if you make the first operand of the "outer" shift operator 1UL as suggested by p.s.w.g, you then run into this part of the specification instead:

  • When the type of x is long or ulong, the shift count is given by the low-order six bits of count. In other words, the shift count is computed from count & 0x3F.

So the code will do as it seems you expect, at least for n = 5 - but not for n = 6.

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Thanks. This is the explanation I was looking for. So for n=6, I must explicitly return ~0UL instead of relying on computations with <<. –  user1448926 Jun 26 '13 at 20:35
    
@user1448926: Yes, that's right. –  Jon Skeet Jun 26 '13 at 20:36
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I believe the problem is that the constant 1 is considered an System.Int32 so it assumes that's the datatype you want to operate on, but it quickly overflows the bounds of that datatype. If you change it to:

ulong res = (1ul<<(1<<n))-1;

It works for me:

var ns = new[] { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 };
var output = ns.Select(n => (1ul<<(1<<n))-1); 
// { 0x1ul, 0x3ul, 0xful, 0xfful, 0xfffful, 0xfffffffful, 0ul }
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Thank you. It works for n=5 but not for n=6 as I want ~0ul instead of 0ul. –  user1448926 Jun 26 '13 at 20:37
    
@user1448926 I don't think you can do that with this method, because you will always reach an overflow before subtract 1 from the value. You'd have to use Strilanc's Bigint or array method, or perhaps try starting with ~0ul and right-shifting. –  p.s.w.g Jun 26 '13 at 20:45
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The problem is that the literal '1' is a 32-bit signed integer, not a 64-bit unsigned long. You're exceeding the range of a 32-bit integer when n is 5 or more.

Changing the appropriate 1 to 1UL fixes the issue, and works for n=5 (but not n=6, which exceeds the range of a ulong).

ulong res = (1UL<<(1<<n))-1;

Getting it to work for n=6 (i.e. to get 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF) is not as easy. One simple solution is to use a BigInteger, which will remove the issue that bit-shifts by 64 aren't defined for 64-bit integers.

// (reference and using System.Numerics)
ulong res = (ulong)(BigInteger.One<<(1<<n)-1)

However, that won't be particularly fast. Maybe an array of the constants?

var arr = new[] {0x1, 0x3, 0xF, 0xFF, 0xFFFF, 0xFFFFFFFF, 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF};
ulong res = arr[n];
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