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See the following code from http://wiki.apache.org/couchdb/Replication. Notice that docs_written = docs_read, but progress = 3. Why isn't progress = 100?

Also, would there be any difference between couchdb and couchbase?

$ curl http://localhost:5984/_active_tasks
[
    {
        "pid": "<0.1303.0>",
        "replication_id": "e42a443f5d08375c8c7a1c3af60518fb+create_target",
        "checkpointed_source_seq": 17333,
        "continuous": false,
        "doc_write_failures": 0,
        "docs_read": 17833,
        "docs_written": 17833,
        "missing_revisions_found": 17833,
        "progress": 3,
        "revisions_checked": 17833,
        "source": "http://fdmanana.iriscouch.com/test_db/",
        "source_seq": 551202,
        "started_on": 1316229471,
        "target": "test_db",
        "type": "replication",
        "updated_on": 1316230082
    }
]
share|improve this question
    
    
I edited this question to remove Couchbase from the title and tag. Couchbase is a very different product than CouchDB, but uses some of the same code. This question would not apply to Couchbase. – mikewied Jun 27 '13 at 17:36
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Because 17333 * 100 / 551202 = 3.

share|improve this answer
    
OK, source_seq = number of docs that need to be replicated, right? – Brad Rhoads Jun 26 '13 at 21:00
    
not quite, there's no way to know in advance which of the updates need replicating (they might all exist on the target, or none might). checkpointed_source_seq is how far the replicator has got, source_seq is the current seq of the db. the replicator has to check all the updates between the two. – Robert Newson Jun 26 '13 at 22:55

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