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I would like to understand how the built-in function property works. The confusing part for me is that property can be a decorator as well while it does not have arguments for decorating a function.

This example is from the documentation:

class C(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._x = None

    def getx(self):
        return self._x
    def setx(self, value):
        self._x = value
    def delx(self):
        del self._x
    x = property(getx, setx, delx, "I'm the 'x' property.")

property's arguments are getx, setx, delx and a doc string.

In the code below property is used as decorator. The object of it is the x function, but in the code above there is no place for an object function in the arguments.

class C(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._x = None

    @property
    def x(self):
        """I'm the 'x' property."""
        return self._x

    @x.setter
    def x(self, value):
        self._x = value

    @x.deleter
    def x(self):
        del self._x

And, how are the x.setter and x.deleter decorators created? I am confused.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 95 down vote accepted

The property() function returns a special descriptor object:

>>> property()
<property object at 0x10ff07940>

It is this object that has extra methods:

>>> property().getter
<built-in method getter of property object at 0x10ff07998>
>>> property().setter
<built-in method setter of property object at 0x10ff07940>
>>> property().deleter
<built-in method deleter of property object at 0x10ff07998>

These act as decorators too. They return a new property object:

>>> property().getter(None)
<property object at 0x10ff079f0>

that is a copy of the old object, but with one of the functions replaced.

Remember, that the @decorator syntax is just syntactic sugar; the syntax:

@property
def foo(self): return self._foo

really means the same thing as

def foo(self): return self._foo
foo = property(foo)

so foo the function is replaced by property(foo), which we saw above is a special object. Then when you use @foo.setter(), what you are doing is call that property().setter method I showed you above, which returns a copy of the same property, but with the setter function replaced with the decorated method.

The following sequence also creates a full-on property, by using those decorator methods.

First we create some functions and a property object with just a getter:

>>> def getter(self): print 'Get!'
... 
>>> def setter(self, value): print 'Set to {!r}!'.format(value)
... 
>>> def deleter(self): print 'Delete!'
... 
>>> prop = property(getter)
>>> prop.fget is getter
True
>>> prop.fset is None
True
>>> prop.fdel is None
True

Next we use the .setter() method to add a setter:

>>> prop = prop.setter(setter)
>>> prop.fget is getter
True
>>> prop.fset is setter
True
>>> prop.fdel is None
True

Last we add a deleter with the .deleter() method:

>>> prop = prop.deleter(deleter)
>>> prop.fget is getter
True
>>> prop.fset is setter
True
>>> prop.fdel is deleter
True

Last but not least, the property object act as a descriptor object, so it has .__get__(), .__set__() and .__delete__() methods to hook into instance attribute getting, setting and deleting:

>>> class Foo(object): pass
... 
>>> prop.__get__(Foo(), Foo)
Get!
>>> prop.__set__(Foo(), 'bar')
Set to 'bar'!
>>> prop.__delete__(Foo())
Delete!

The Descriptor Howto includes a pure python sample implementation of the property() type:

class Property(object):
    "Emulate PyProperty_Type() in Objects/descrobject.c"

    def __init__(self, fget=None, fset=None, fdel=None, doc=None):
        self.fget = fget
        self.fset = fset
        self.fdel = fdel
        if doc is None and fget is not None:
            doc = fget.__doc__
        self.__doc__ = doc

    def __get__(self, obj, objtype=None):
        if obj is None:
            return self
        if self.fget is None:
            raise AttributeError("unreadable attribute")
        return self.fget(obj)

    def __set__(self, obj, value):
        if self.fset is None:
            raise AttributeError("can't set attribute")
        self.fset(obj, value)

    def __delete__(self, obj):
        if self.fdel is None:
            raise AttributeError("can't delete attribute")
        self.fdel(obj)

    def getter(self, fget):
        return type(self)(fget, self.fset, self.fdel, self.__doc__)

    def setter(self, fset):
        return type(self)(self.fget, fset, self.fdel, self.__doc__)

    def deleter(self, fdel):
        return type(self)(self.fget, self.fset, fdel, self.__doc__)
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Very good. You could add the fact that after Foo.prop = prop you can do Foo().prop = 5; pront Foo().prop; del Foo().prop with the desired outcome. –  glglgl Jun 27 '13 at 7:25
    
Excellent answer! +1. Enough detail here that I can just re-read if I still don't get it. Bookmarking this one for sure. –  henrebotha Jan 4 at 8:06
    
Why do property().getter and property().deleter have the same address, but property().setter does not? –  gerrit Jun 12 at 19:10
    
Method objects are created on the fly and can reuse the same memory location if available. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 12 at 19:15
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The first part is simple:

@property
def x(self): ...

is the same as

def x(self): ...
x = property(x)
  • which, in turn, is the simplified syntax for creating a property with just a getter.

The next step would be to extend this property with a setter and a deleter. And this happens with the appropriate methods:

@x.setter
def x(self, value): ...

returns a new property which inherits everything from the old x plus the given setter.

x.deleter works the same way.

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Documentation says it's just a shortcut for creating readonly properties. So

@property
def x(self):
    return self._x

is equvivalent to

def getx(self):
    return x
x = property(getx)
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