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I am quite impressed by the workflow I follow when developing Android applications: Define a layout in an xml file and then write all the code in a code-behind style. Is there an equivalent style for the web? I mean, with a predefined list of widgets that can be defined using a markup language and then control them using code?

I have come across Google's Web Toolkit that does something like this but I'd like to hear what other's think as well.

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I know this a fairly old thread, but if you haven't tried it by now, Wicket is exactly like this. I came from doing wicket development to Android and it has made it tons easier. Exact same concept. Define your UI with HTML and then any html objects you need any control logic on, you set a Wicket ID. Then in a wicket java file, you write your logic referencing the html wicket ID's that were set. It has tons of predefined widgets that handle so much behind the scenes. It's one of the best web frameworks I've dealt with.

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@user573038: +1 Great. Thanks. I will look into it. –  Legend Feb 6 '11 at 20:33
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Try asp.net with Visual Studio. No xml needed! Add the MVC framework, and you're in heaven.

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Any equivalent for the linux box? .NET requires IIS. I would love anything that runs on the cheap webhosts out there... –  Legend Nov 14 '09 at 2:42
    
how cheap are you talking? I've seen super cheap windows hosting everywhere I've seen cheap Linux hosting –  Rich Apr 21 '10 at 20:02
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PHP Framework: http://www.pradosoft.com/

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Google web toolkit works somewhat in the manner you're describing, especially the 2.0 version that's coming out, which will allow defining the layout in html/xml, rather than java swing style widget adding.

And as Benji said, Asp.net works exactly like this.

Personally, I much prefer an MVC approach over a code-behind approach.

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