Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Calculating minutes (m) and hours (h) from seconds (s) works as I expect when s is positive:

s = 14200
h = s/3600 #=> 3
m = (s % 3600 ) / 60 #=> 56

However, if s is a negative number, I get different results:

s = -14200
h = s/3600 #=> -4
m = (s % 3600 ) / 60 #=> 3

I don't understand why I get -4 hours and 3 minutes when I start with the same number of seconds, just negative.

What is going on here? And is there any way I can get consistent results for positive and negative values? Beyond using s.abs % 3600 and modifying the results if s was negative?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

14200 divided by 3600 is approximately 3.9, which in integer arithmetic is truncated to 3.

-14200 divided by 3600 is approximately -3.9, which in integer arithmetic is truncated to -4.

With %, negatives "count backward" from the second value -- your results make perfect sense when you keep that in mind. For example:

 1 % 6 # => 1
-1 % 6 # => 5

Update: I think you need to think about exactly what you want if the seconds are negative. You might do something like this:

dir = "from now"

if s < 0
  dir = "ago"
  s = -s
end

h = s / 3600
m = (s % 3600 ) / 60

puts "s represents #{h} hours and #{m} minutes #{dir}"

What to do really depends on exactly what h and m mean in the greater context of your code, and exactly what negative s values mean in that context.

In another situation, maybe you want h and m to have the same absolute value as if s was positive but with the same sign as s:

sign = s < 0 ? -1 : 1
s = s.abs

h = s / 3600 * sign
m = (s % 3600 ) / 60 * sign

It's up to you to determine what is appropriate in your situation.

share|improve this answer
    
They make sense to us, not to the OP. :-) –  the Tin Man Jun 26 '13 at 23:48
    
@theTinMan Okay, reworded slightly. I hope the results will make sense to OP when they think about what % means for negative values, and "counting backward" seems like a good mental model for it. –  Darshan-Josiah Barber Jun 26 '13 at 23:53
    
Now I understand why. Any way I can get consistent results for positive and negative values? Beyond using s.abs % 3600 and modifying the results if s was negative? After all, -14200 seconds are still minus 3 hours and 56 minutes, not minus 4 hours and 3 minutes. –  aaandre Jun 27 '13 at 0:06
    
@aaandre Calling abs or otherwise negating negative values of s seems like the right way to do the math to me. The appropriate action depends on what you need and is hard to judge from the information provided. (See my updated answer.) –  Darshan-Josiah Barber Jun 27 '13 at 0:15
    
Thank you for the straightforward explanation and code examples! My code ended up almost identical to the last one. –  aaandre Jun 27 '13 at 23:19

You can think of integer division in ruby implemented like this --

given a and b, ruby finds integer solutions to q b + m = a such that

  1. m is the same sign as b
  2. the value of m is made as small (close to zero) as possible.

These two rules give you unique solutions for q (a / b) and m (a % b).

in your first case, a is 14200 and b is 3600. The unique solutions of q b + m = a that follow those rules is q = 3 and m = 1600 -- try it.

> 3 * 3600 + 1600
# => 12400

Is this the only solution? What about q = 4? then

4 * 3600 + m = 12400
m = -2000

nope ... not only is m now bigger than before, but it's even the wrong sign (remember the first rule?)

What about q = 2 ?

2 * 3600 + m = 12400
m = 5200

nope ... our first solution for m was smaller. Therefore the only values of q and m possible are 3 and 1600.

Now let's try your second case -- a is -12400 and b is 3600 again. The unique solution is q = -4 and b = 2000.

Let's check.

> -4 * 3600 + 2000
# => -12400

it works!

let's quickly check other values of q -- let's try -3, the "obvious" answer if we compare to the first example:

-3 * 3600 + m = -12400
m = -1600

okay...well, m here is "smaller" than before...so it fits Rule #2. But rule #1 says that m has to be the same sign as b...so we won't accept negative values of m.

Therefore the only unique solutions are q = -4 and m = 2000.

The other two divisions then in your question should be clear from here.

In order to get the results you seem to expect, you should use -3600 instead of 3600 for your hour dividend.

share|improve this answer

Gotta watch out for % and negative numbers. They're tricksy:


irb(main):011:0> 14200 % 3600
=> 3400
irb(main):012:0> -14200 % 3600
=> 200
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.