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In Perl, what is the difference between

$status = 500;

and

$status = '500';
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5  
Absolutely nothing! –  Ryan Kempt Jun 27 '13 at 0:51
    
I hate it when my (Randal) Schwartz gets twisted! –  Brian Roach Jun 27 '13 at 0:56
    
@adriancdperu Heh, sorry - vague SpaceBalls reference / perl tie-in as a follow-up to Ryan. –  Brian Roach Jun 27 '13 at 1:03
4  
2  
@RyanKempt not true. –  hobbs Jun 27 '13 at 15:59

10 Answers 10

up vote 35 down vote accepted

Not much. They both assign five hundred to $status. The internal format used will be different initially (IV vs PV,UTF8=0), but that's of no importance to Perl.

However, there are things that behave different based on the choice of storage format even though they shouldn't. Based on the choice of storage format,

  • JSON decides whether to use quotes or not.
  • DBI guesses the SQL type it should use for a parameter.
  • The bitwise operators (&, | and ^) guess whether their operands are strings or not.
  • open and other file-related builtins encode the file name using UTF-8 or not. (Bug!)
  • Some mathematical operations return negative zero or not.
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1  
If you pass that number through a JSON constructor, one will output "500", the other will output 500 –  alexk Jun 30 '13 at 19:43
1  
@alexk, see update. –  ikegami Jun 30 '13 at 19:57

As already @ikegami told not much. But remember than here is MUCH difference between

$ perl -E '$v=0500; say $v'

prints 320 (decimal value of 0500 octal number), and

$ perl -E '$v="0500"; say $v'

what prints

0500

and

$ perl -E '$v=0900; say $v'

what dies with error:

Illegal octal digit '9' at -e line 1, at end of line
Execution of -e aborted due to compilation errors.

And

perl -E '$v="0300";say $v+1'

prints

301

but

perl -E '$v="0300";say ++$v'

prints

0301

similar with 0x\d+, e.g:

$v = 0x900;
$v = "0x900";
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awesome reply i shall save in my perl details&thingies folder –  ado Jun 27 '13 at 2:06
3  
This seems a bit irrelevant to the question to be the selected answer IMO –  plusplus Jun 27 '13 at 11:57
6  
@plusplus This question shows the (usual) problems in perl community. When the OP ask's this type of question, sure don't want hear about "internal representation", but want know some basics around. What is a difference between diamond and graphite? Usually don't want answer: It is the same, only differs in its internal structure - the answer is true, but... you know. Guys, most of you, who answers perl questions here are perl-GODs - and as for every GOD the normal peoples problems seems too trivial and want give most precise and short answer. Not always is this the best for us. :) –  cajwine Jun 27 '13 at 15:48
1  
@jm666, Also, 4+4 is different than '4+4'. This comes up a lot in questions concerning interpolation. –  ikegami Jun 30 '13 at 20:00
1  
@ikegami sry for bad english. The OP usually want answers like: The diamond is expensive, graphite cheap, with diamonds you can attract womans, not with graphite, the diamond is hard, graphite not. Your answers are like: Both are the same, as allotropes of carbon and differs in internal structure, and after you adding deeper explanaton: In the diamond atoms are arranged tetrahedrally and each carbon atom is attached to four carbon atoms with an C-C-C bond in a angle of 109.5 degrees. The pi bond electrons in the graphite... Don't want be offensive, but you sure see the difference. :) –  cajwine Jul 1 '13 at 21:31

There is only a difference if you then use $var with one of the few operators that has different flavors when operating on a string or a number:

$string = '500';
$number = 500;
print $string & '000', "\n";
print $number & '000', "\n";

output:

000
0
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This seems the most practical answer to me. –  Disco 3 Jun 27 '13 at 17:03

To provide a bit more context on the "not much" responses, here is a representation of the internal data structures of the two values via the Devel::Peek module:

user@foo ~ $ perl -MDevel::Peek -e 'print Dump 500; print Dump "500"'
SV = IV(0x7f8e8302c280) at 0x7f8e8302c288
  REFCNT = 1
  FLAGS = (PADTMP,IOK,READONLY,pIOK)
  IV = 500
SV = PV(0x7f8e83004e98) at 0x7f8e8302c2d0
  REFCNT = 1
  FLAGS = (PADTMP,POK,READONLY,pPOK)
  PV = 0x7f8e82c1b4e0 "500"\0
  CUR = 3
  LEN = 16

Here is a dump of Perl doing what you mean:

user@foo ~ $ perl -MDevel::Peek -e 'print Dump ("500" + 1)'
SV = IV(0x7f88b202c268) at 0x7f88b202c270
  REFCNT = 1
  FLAGS = (PADTMP,IOK,READONLY,pIOK)
  IV = 501
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The first is a number (the integer between 499 and 501). The second is a string (the characters '5', '0', and '0'). It's not true that there's no difference between them. It's not true that one will be converted immediately to the other. It is true that strings are converted to numbers when necessary, and vice-versa, and the conversion is mostly transparent, but not completely.

The answer When does the difference between a string and a number matter in Perl 5 covers some of the cases where they're not equivalent:

  • Bitwise operators treat numbers numerically (operating on the bits of the binary representation of each number), but they treat strings character-wise (operating on the bits of each character of each string).
  • The JSON module will output a string as a string (with quotes) even if it's numeric, but it will output a number as a number.
  • A very small or very large number might stringify differently than you expect, whereas a string is already a string and doesn't need to be stringified. That is, if $x = 1000000000000000 and $y = "1000000000000000" then $x might stringify to 1e+15. Since using a variable as a hash key is stringifying, that means that $hash{$x} and $hash{$y} may be different hash slots.
  • The smart-match (~~) and given/when operators treat number arguments differently from numeric strings. Best to avoid those operators anyway.
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There are different internally:)

($_ ^ $_) ne '0' ? print "$_ is string\n" : print "$_ is numeric\n" for (500, '500');

output:

500 is numeric
500 is string
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Many answers already to this question but i'll give it a shot for the confused newbie:

my $foo = 500;
my $bar = '500';

As they are, for practical pourposes they are the "same". The interesting part is when you use operators. For example:

print $foo + 0;

output: 500

The '+' operator sees a number at its left and a number at its right, both decimals, hence the answer is 500 + 0 => 500

print $bar + 0;

output: 500

Same output, the operator sees a string that looks like a decimal integer at its left, and a zero at its right, hence 500 + 0 => 500

But where are the differences? It depends on the operator used. Operators decide what's going to happen. For example:

my $foo = '128hello';
print $foo + 0;
output: 128

In this case it behaves like atoi() in C. It takes biggest numeric part starting from the left and uses it as a number. If there are no numbers it uses it as a 0.

How to deal with this in conditionals?

my $foo = '0900';
my $bar = 900;
if( $foo == $bar)
{print "ok!"}
else
{print "not ok!"}

output: ok!

== compares the numerical value in both variables. if you use warnings it will complain about using == with strings but it will still try to coerce.

my $foo = '0900';
my $bar = 900;
if( $foo eq $bar)
{print "ok!"}
else
{print "not ok!"}

output: not ok!

eq compares strings for equality.

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I think this perfectly demonstrates what is going on.

$ perl -MDevel::Peek -e 'my ($a, $b) = (500, "500");print Dump $a; print Dump $b; $a.""; $b+0; print Dump $a; print Dump $b'
SV = IV(0x8cca90) at 0x8ccaa0
  REFCNT = 1
  FLAGS = (PADMY,IOK,pIOK)
  IV = 500
SV = PV(0x8acc20) at 0x8ccad0
  REFCNT = 1
  FLAGS = (PADMY,POK,pPOK)
  PV = 0x8c5da0 "500"\0
  CUR = 3
  LEN = 16
SV = PVIV(0x8c0f88) at 0x8ccaa0
  REFCNT = 1
  FLAGS = (PADMY,IOK,POK,pIOK,pPOK)
  IV = 500
  PV = 0x8d3660 "500"\0
  CUR = 3
  LEN = 16
SV = PVIV(0x8c0fa0) at 0x8ccad0
  REFCNT = 1
  FLAGS = (PADMY,IOK,POK,pIOK,pPOK)
  IV = 500
  PV = 0x8c5da0 "500"\0
  CUR = 3
  LEN = 16

Each scalar (SV) can have string (PV) and or numeric (IV) representation. Once you use variable with only string representation in any numeric operation and one with only numeric representation in any string operation they have both representations. To be correct, there can be also another number representation, the floating point representation (NV) so there are three possible representation of scalar value.

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You can try "^" operator.

my $str  = '500';
my $num  = 500;

if ($num ^ $num)
{
    print 'haha\n';
}

if ($str ^ $str)
{
    print 'hehe\n';
}

$str ^ $str is different from $num ^ $num so you will get "hehe". ps, "^" will change the arguments, so you should do

my $temp = $str;
if ($temp ^ $temp )
{
    print 'hehe\n';
}

. I usually use this operator to tell the difference between num and str in perl.

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There is no significant difference, it is stored differently but they will behave almost identically for most mathematical operations.

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