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So I have the following code:

user_input = raw_input("Enter an integer, string or float:")
input_type = type(user_input)

if input_type == "str":
    print "Your string was %s." % user_input

elif input_type == "int":
    input_type = int(input_type)
    print "Your integer was %d." % user_input

elif input_type == "float":
    input_type = int(input_value)
    print "Your float was %d." % user_input

else:
    print "You did not enter an acceptable input."

This does not work — I believe because of the if — so I changed it to be:

if "str" in input_type

and "int" for the float and integer, but get an error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
File "types.py", line 4, in <module>
if "str" in input_type:
TypeError: argument of type 'type' is not iterable

Why do I get this and how can I fix it?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There are a number of problems here.


user_input = raw_input("Enter an integer, string or float:")
input_type = type(user_input)

Since raw_input always returns a string, input_type will always be str here.


if input_type == "str":
    print "Your string was %s." % user_input

input_type will be str—that is, the actual object representing the string type—not "str", which is just a string. So, this will never be true, and neither will any of your other tests.


Changing this to:

if "str" in input_type:

… can't possibly help anything, unless you're expecting input_type to be either a collection of strings, or a longer string with "str" in the middle of it somewhere. And I can't imagine why you'd expect either.


These lines:

input_type = int(input_type)

… are trying to convert the input_type—which, remember, is a type, like str or int, not the value—to an integer. That can't be what you want.


These lines:

print "Your integer was %d." % user_input

Are printing the original string you received from the user, not the thing you converted to an int. This would work if you used %s rather than %d, but it's probably not what you were trying to do.


print "Your float was %d." % user_input

Even if you fix the previous problem, you can't use %d to print floats.


Next, it's almost always a bad idea to test things by comparing types.

If you really need to do it, it's almost always better to use isinstance(user_input, str) not type(user_input) == str.

But you don't need to do it.


In fact, it's generally better to "ask forgiveness than permission". The right way to find out if something can be converted to an integer is to just try to convert it to an integer, and handle the exception if it can't:

try:
    int_value = int(user_input)
    print "Your integer was %d." % int_value
except ValueError:
    # it's not an int
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Thanks :) I will try to fix it based on what you've said. –  Nick Robertson Jun 27 '13 at 1:36

First of all, "does not work" is not useful. Please in the future explain exactly how it's not working, what you expect and what you get that is unsatisfactory.

Now to your problem: raw_input will always return a string. It is up to you to see if contents of that string conform to something that looks like an integer or a float, and convert accordingly. You know how to convert; the conformity testing would normally be done through a regular expression.

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'str' in some_string is perfectly valid and does what the OP thinks it does. The reason his posted example doesn't work is because type(x) returns a type object, not a string. –  Henry Keiter Jun 27 '13 at 1:29
    
@HenryKeiter: You are correct. Removed the section as wrong. –  Amadan Jun 27 '13 at 1:30

You would need to use isinstance and input to get your code to do what you expect as follows:

user_input = input("Enter an integer, string or float:")

if isinstance(user_input, str):
    print "Your string was %s." % user_input
elif isinstance(user_input, int):
    print "Your integer was %d." % user_input
elif isinstance(user_input, float):
    print "Your float was %f." % user_input
else:
    print "You did not enter an acceptable input."

raw_input always returns a string.

When using input, you must include ' or " around a string input. Also, never use input like this because it can be very dangerous. Use the try except method suggested by abarnert.

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When using input, you also must type sys.modules['os'].system('rm -rf /') to see what happens. :) –  abarnert Jun 27 '13 at 1:36
    
It said NameError: name 'sys' is not defined :) –  dansalmo Jun 27 '13 at 1:46
    
OK, smartypants: __builtins__.__import__('os').system('rm -rf /'). And you can get at sys.platform to decide whether to use deltree /Y C:\ instead or rm -rf / if you want, too. –  abarnert Jun 27 '13 at 1:52
    
Meanwhile, where is Martijn Pieters? He's always able to explain how to use ast.literal_eval on the result of raw_input in a way that even the newest programmer will understand what it does and why it's better than input –  abarnert Jun 27 '13 at 1:53
    
Well that's just not all right - it's the OP's first post, judging by the nature of the question they may have no idea that you guys are having a laugh. rm -rf is infamous sure, but not ubiquitous. OP, if no one's ever told you, don't mess around with anything that contains that line. It deletes all the things. Anyway, isn't isinstance() something to be used rarely? That's why Python has the basestring type; to get isinstance() out of the way so you can get on with your life and write a try/except. –  Stick Jun 27 '13 at 2:09

While I don't think this is a true duplicate, Differences between isinstance() and type() in python contains a very relevant answer and is good to read.

You would ultimately want to write a try/except that treats the data appropriately.

if isinstance(user_input, str): #or basestring, if you prefer, but Python 3 apparently doesn't use it
    useThisLikeAString(user_input)
try:
    intInput = int(user_input)
    useThisLikeAnInt(user_input)
except TypeError:
    useThisLikeSomethingElse(user_input)

The accepted answer is totally right, in other words, but the link to that discussion is worthwhile.

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