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I am working on some code that has to manipulate unicode strings. I am trying to write doctests for it, but am having trouble. The following is a minimal example that illustrates the problem:

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
def mylen(word):
  """
  >>> mylen(u"áéíóú")
  5
  """
  return len(word)

print mylen(u"áéíóú")

First we run the code to see the expected output of print mylen(u"áéíóú").

$ python mylen.py
5

Next, we run doctest on it to see the problem.

$ python -m
5
**********************************************************************
File "mylen.py", line 4, in mylen.mylen
Failed example:
    mylen(u"áéíóú")
Expected:
    5
Got:
    10
**********************************************************************
1 items had failures:
   1 of   1 in mylen.mylen
***Test Failed*** 1 failures.

How then can I test that mylen(u"áéíóú") evaluates to 5?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

If you want unicode strings, you have to use unicode docstrings! Mind the u!

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
def mylen(word):
  u"""        <----- SEE 'u' HERE
  >>> mylen(u"áéíóú")
  5
  """
  return len(word)

print mylen(u"áéíóú")

This will work -- as long as the tests pass. For Python 2.x you need yet another hack to make verbose doctest mode work or get correct tracebacks when tests fail:

if __name__ == "__main__":
    import sys
    reload(sys)
    sys.setdefaultencoding("UTF-8")
    import doctest
    doctest.testmod()

NB! Only ever use setdefaultencoding for debug purposes. I'd accept it for doctest use, but not anywhere in your production code.

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Thanks! This approach won't work with any package that auto-discovers tests on Python 2.x though. –  saffsd Nov 15 '09 at 22:20

This appears to be a known and as yet unresolved issue in Python. See open issues here and here.

Not surprisingly, it can be modified to work OK in Python 3 since all strings are Unicode there:

def mylen(word):
  """
  >>> mylen("áéíóú")
  5
  """
  return len(word)

print(mylen("áéíóú"))
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Fair enough, this is probably the better general solution. However, in my case I am still constrained to Python 2.x due to dependencies on matplotlib and numpy. –  saffsd Nov 15 '09 at 22:22

Python 2.6.6 doesn't understand unicode output very well, but this can be fixed using:

  • already described hack with sys.setdefaultencoding("UTF-8")
  • unicode docstring (already mentioned above too, thanks a lot)
  • AND print statement.

In my case this docstring tells that test is broken:

def beatiful_units(*units):
    u'''Returns nice string like 'erg/(cm² sec)'.

    >>> beatiful_units(('erg', 1), ('cm', -2), ('sec', -1))
    u'erg/(cm² sec)'
    '''

with "error" message

Failed example:
    beatiful_units(('erg', 1), ('cm', -2), ('sec', -1))
Expected:
    u'erg/(cm² sec)'
Got:
    u'erg/(cm\xb2 sec)'

Using print we can fix that:

def beatiful_units(*units):
    u'''Returns nice string like 'erg/(cm² sec)'.

    >>> print beatiful_units(('erg', 1), ('cm', -2), ('sec', -1))
    erg/(cm² sec)
    '''
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last fix with print saved my day, thanks! –  Denis Golomazov Aug 5 '11 at 18:26

My solution was to escape the unicode characters, like u'\xe1\xe9\xed\xf3\xfa'. Wasn't as easy to read though, but my tests only had a few non-ASCII characters so in those cases I put the description to the side as a comment, like "# n with tilde".

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Thanks! Unfortunately this approach breaks 'make doctest' with sphinx. It ends up with a 'utf8' codec can't decode bytes in position ...: invalid data. –  saffsd Nov 15 '09 at 22:18
    
Hmmm. Well, I'm using it for my own doctests. Sorry, but I don't know what's going on here. –  Andrew Dalke Nov 16 '09 at 1:04

As already mentioned, you need to ensure your docstrings are Unicode.

If you can switch to Python 3, then it would work automatically there, as both the source encoding is already utf-8 and the default string type is Unicode.

To achieve the same in Python 2, you need to keep the coding: utf-8 next to which you can either prefix all docstrings with u, or simply add

from __future__ import unicode_literals
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