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I am writing a program to sort a vector of office employees by using insertion-sort. I am facing a doubt while inserting the records of the employees. The doubts are:-

  1. In comment#1, why am I using a vector of pointers to the cOffice class ? Why can't I just use a vector of simple objects ?
  2. In comment#2, why am I using new keyword to create memory at runtime ? Why can't I just copy a class instance( along with the arguments ) as if I am copying an object into other ?

The code along with the comments is as follow:-

#include<iostream>
#include<vector>
#include<string>
using namespace std;
class cPerson
{
    private:
    string firstname,lastname;
    int age;
    public:
    cPerson(string fn,string ln,int a)      // constructor to input the firstname, lastname and age of the person
    {
        firstname=fn;
        lastname=ln;
        age=a;
    }
    void displaycPerson()
    {
        cout<<"First Name = "<<firstname<<"\n";
        cout<<"Last Name = "<<lastname<<"\n";
        cout<<"Age = "<<age<<"\n";
    }
    string getLastName()
    {
        return lastname;
    }
};
class cOffice
{
    private:
        vector<cPerson*> v;         // Comment#1 and the alteranate code is: vector<cPerson> v;
        int nElem;                      
    public:
        cOffice(int max)
        {
            v.resize(max);              
            nElem=0;                    
        }
        ~cOffice()
        {
            for(int i=0;i<nElem;i++)    // no use of the destructor if the above code is implemented
                delete v[i];
        }
        void insertRec(string fn1, string ln1, int a1)      // inserting the record
        {
            v[nElem] = new cPerson(fn1,ln1,a1);     // Comment#2 and the alteranate code is: v[nElem] = cPerson(fn1,ln1,a1);
            nElem++;
        }
        void InsertionSort()
        {
            int compare,pivot;
            for(pivot=1;pivot<nElem;pivot++)
            {
                cPerson* temp = v[pivot];       
                compare=pivot;
                while(compare>0&&v[compare-1]->getLastName()>=temp->getLastName())
                {   
                    v[compare]=v[compare-1];
                    compare--;
                }
                v[compare] = temp;
            }
        }   
        void display()
        {
            for(int i=0;i<nElem;i++)
                v[i]->displaycPerson();
        }
};
int main(void)
{
    cOffice obj(10);
    obj.insertRec("Evans", "Patty", 24); 
    obj.insertRec("Adams", "Henry", 63);
    obj.insertRec("Yee", "Tom", 43);
    obj.insertRec("Smith", "Lorraine", 37);
    obj.insertRec("Hashimoto", "Sato", 21);             
    obj.insertRec("Stimson", "Henry", 29);
    obj.insertRec("Velasquez", "Jose", 72);
    obj.insertRec("Lamarque", "Henry", 54);
    obj.insertRec("Vang", "Minh", 22);
    obj.insertRec("Creswell", "Lucinda", 18);
    obj.display();
    obj.InsertionSort();
    obj.display();
    return 0;
}

Obviously, the rest of the code will be changed accordingly by replacing -> with . and removing all the dereference operators *.

If I make all the edits that I mentioned in the question, the program shows error which is as follows:

In member function 'void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::resize(std::vector<_Tp, Alloc>::size_type, std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::value_type) [with _Tp = cPerson; _Alloc = std::allocator<cPerson>; std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::size_type = unsigned int; std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::value_type = cPerson]':
   exp.cpp:40:16: error: no matching function for call to 'cPerson::cPerson()'
   exp.cpp:40:16: note: candidates are:
   exp.cpp:11:2: note: cPerson::cPerson(std::string, std::string, int)
   exp.cpp:11:2: note:   candidate expects 3 arguments, 0 provided
   exp.cpp:5:7: note: cPerson::cPerson(const cPerson&)
   exp.cpp:5:7: note:   candidate expects 1 argument, 0 provided
share|improve this question
5  
It will be a lot easier if you just use a vector of cPersons. There's no benefit of using pointers in this case (rather disadvantages, the memory isn't laid out continuously). –  stefan Jun 27 '13 at 7:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

When sorting your array, I think manipulating pointers would be faster than manipulating instances of objects.
Your InsertionSort() function would be calling a heck lot of copy constructors in the case of instances (which means: 2 new string allocations, 2 memcpy, and 2 memory free on old strings). In the case of pointers, it just swaps values.

So IMO you're fine using heap instances.

Now the gain of using pointers for sorting would be significant only for a few thousand entries. In your case, with 10 entries, the gain is not so important. So feel free to switch to storing objects instead. This will make your code smaller and, more importantly, easier to maintain.

Also, another reason might be that you don't have a copy constructor for cPerson and wanted to keep it that way (see Rule of Three)

share|improve this answer
    
True, but let's face it: He probably doesn't manage an office with more than a few hundred employees, so the time to sort this probably will not be measurable (this was written before your edit). It's still not actually necessarily faster to handle pointers. Just think of the cache: With vector of objects, more elements are in the cache, with a vector of pointers, there's a lot more jumping around in the memory. –  stefan Jun 27 '13 at 7:12
    
Well, yes and no: when sorting and swapping the objects in the array, he will actually call copy constructors each time the swap is done. This means allocating two new strings and deleting two unused ones. This could be way more work than just swapping pointers. –  Gui13 Jun 27 '13 at 7:18

As mentioned in @xgbis answer and in the comments, the vector of objects should be preferred in case of only a few objects. Pointers should be used if copying the objects is really expensive and you have a lot of them.

The reason for why your code with vector<cPerson> does not work is that your create the vector with a size of 10. This tells the compiler to create 10 objects of type cPerson, but without any arguments. So the compiler tries to call cPerson();. This constructor does not exists, the only one you provide is with two strings and an int.

Change your code this way

cOffice(int max)
{
    v.reserve(max); // not strictly necessary, but may improve performance      
}

void insertRec(string fn1, string ln1, int a1)
{
    v.push_back(cPerson(fn1,ln1,a1));
}

Instead of nElem you should use v.size().

share|improve this answer

I think that you need pointers to rightly model inheritance. In office, there will be different persons, and the natural way to model them is with a base class cPerson, inherited by - for instance - cEmployee, in turn inherited by - cManager, etc etc. Such modelling relies on virtual functions to get access to common modelled properties.

C++ requires pointers (or references) to be able to use virtual functions calls. Hence the requirement of pointers.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 The code doesn't actually do that, but it's a good consideration. –  Tony D Jun 27 '13 at 7:45

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