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Is there any non-painful way to upgrade an Eclipse installation? I have tried browsing the eclipse site but I cannot find an useful description. Maybe it is too early.

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Eclipse's wiki provides an explanation which worked in my case. –  Abdull Aug 20 '13 at 23:03
    
In my experience, a fresh unzip works better than trying to upgrade. Also create new workspaces. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Nov 13 '13 at 4:58
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3 Answers

up vote 109 down vote accepted

Add the update URL to your available sites:

Window > Preferences > Install/Update > Available Software Sites > Add...

KEPLER = http://download.eclipse.org/releases/kepler/
LUNA = http://download.eclipse.org/releases/luna/

Then tell Eclipse to look for updates: Help > Check for updates.

After the installation, Eclipse will restart and show the old splash screen. Next time you manually stop/start Eclipse it will correctly show the correct splash screen.

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@PaulVerest The FAQ How do I upgrade Eclipse page disagrees with you. It suggests platform upgrades were only a problem in v3.3 or earlier. –  Duncan Jun 28 '13 at 7:06
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Nice to know. But is the FAQ really up-to-date? Could user really upgrade 3.7 to 4.3 for example? What about all those plugins, that can break on newer platform? –  Paul Verest Jun 28 '13 at 7:14
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@PaulVerest Good question! The docs do feel a little rusty. I just don't know the extent to which you can trust the upgrade system. I think I've only ever upgraded once before, all other times I just fresh install. –  Duncan Jun 28 '13 at 7:16
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This method worked perfectly fine for me on Windows 7 - but I also edited the update site from 4.2 -> 4.3, e.g.: The Eclipse Project Updates should now point to http://download.eclipse.org/eclipse/updates/4.3 –  Mark Mikofski Jul 25 '13 at 5:58
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oh and I also updated some of my plugin repos to point to kepler too, e.g. cdt, just for consistency, because actually the juno repo worked fine. And I disabled the juno release repo. It was confusing that some of the updated features did not show as installed, even thought they were. –  Mark Mikofski Jul 25 '13 at 6:28
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You can simply download the newer version, then use "File -> Import -> Install -> From Existing Installation" to add all the plugins you had in your previous installation.

Here's a link describing the whole process in details (it says "on Mac Os X", however it should work for other systems as well):

http://www.corephp.com/blog/how-to-upgrade-eclipse-juno-4-2-to-eclipse-kepler-4-3-on-mac-os-x/#.UfJsoI1_McY

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This answer helped me (even for Kepler -> Luna, even though link is for Juno -> Kepler): Updating did not work for me; alternatively I only had to follow the linked steps up to them specifying use existing work space (that got my existing settings, and I didn't happen to need to update any plugins). Pretty painless, at least in my case. –  cellepo Jul 9 at 19:45
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If previous releases are anything to go by, then the answer is No. It is best to download the new release, install it, install the latest versions your favourite plugins and point Eclipse at your workspace.

(Common sense says that you should take a backup of your workspace(s) and your original Eclipse installation.)


I've previously tried the "upgrade" path and found that it was slow and didn't give good results.

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I usually start using new workspace and check-out needed projects. –  Paul Verest Jun 28 '13 at 7:20
    
This method also worked (in addition to the answer above by Duncan Jones. I would definitely back up your workspace first, or at the very least backup your .metadata folder. The downside of this method of course is that you have to reinstall your plugins. My old workspace worked fine with the new version. –  Mark Mikofski Jul 25 '13 at 6:15
    
btw: egit is now part of the standard install, so you don't necessarily have to add the egit repo, although, today (2013-07-24) it had a newer version than the kepler updates repo. –  Mark Mikofski Jul 25 '13 at 6:29
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