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so this is my setup: I am calling a .each on a number of elements and after a few checks I send an ajax request with some JSON data and on success I apply the server response as an attribute to each element(it is usually an id). After that I push the id to an array.

The problem is that obviously ajax requests are asynchronous and the function that uses the array of element ids fires before all ajax have had time to finish.

I've tried with .when and .then but the callback function keeps getting fired way ahead of the ajax.

Here is how my code looks( I've removed some unnecessary parts):

var order = [];

function sub(selector){

selector.each(function(){
    var out = {
        "some":"random",
        "stuff":"here"
    };
        $.ajax({
            type: "POST" 
            url: "/test/url",
            dataType: 'json',
            contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
            data:JSON.stringify(out),
            success:function(response){
                $(this).attr("data-response",response);
                order.push(response);
            }
        })
    })
}

$("#button").click(function(){
    $.when(sub($(".test"))).then(function() {
        console.log(order);
        //i have to run the sub function twice so the order doesn't return undefined
    });     
});
share|improve this question
    
you can keep checking number of itmes in order array untill it is of same size as of selector.each. using setInterval – bitkot Jun 27 '13 at 8:01
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that when acts on deferred objects, however sub doesn't return anything so when fires right away. So what you need to do is to collect all the deferred objects returned by the ajax calls and return them:

var order = [];

function sub(selector){
    var deferredList = []
    selector.each(function(){
        var out = {
            "some":"random",
            "stuff":"here"
        };
        var deferred = $.ajax({
                type: "POST", 
                url: "/test/url",
                dataType: 'json',
                contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
                data:JSON.stringify(out),
                success:function(response){
                    $(this).attr("data-response",response);
                    order.push(response);
                }
            })
        deferredList.push(deferred)
    })
    return deferredList;
}

$("#button").click(function(){
    $.when.apply($,sub($(".test"))).then(function() {
        console.log(order);
        //i have to run the sub function twice so the order doesn't return undefined
    });     
});

The reason to use apply and not when directly is that when doesn't accept array of objects as a parameter and apply provides us the work-around for this.

share|improve this answer
    
this also fires before all the ajax(all the values in the order array are undefined) – Jon Snow Jun 27 '13 at 8:58
    
Works for me, it's possible that the problem in your code is someplace else – Tomer Arazy Jun 27 '13 at 10:12
    
Yes it was actually, all good now. – Jon Snow Jun 27 '13 at 13:59

The argument to $.when() should be a Deferred, but sub() doesn't return anything. This version returns an array of all the Deferreds returned by $.ajax, and calls $.when with them all as arguments; it will then wait for all of them.

var order = [];

function sub(selector){
    return selector.map(function(){
        var out = {
            "some":"random",
            "stuff":"here"
        };
        return $.ajax({
            type: "POST" 
            url: "/test/url",
            dataType: 'json',
            contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
            data:JSON.stringify(out),
            success:function(response){
                $(this).attr("data-response",response);
                order.push(response);
            }
        })
    })
}

$("#button").click(function(){
    $.when.apply(this, sub($(".test"))).then(function() {
        console.log(order);
        //i have to run the sub function twice so the order doesn't return undefined
    });     
});
share|improve this answer
    
shouldn't be success a method of the returned object given by $.ajax? – Alp Jun 27 '13 at 8:12
1  
$.ajax() returns a jqXHR object, which implements the Promise interface in addition to AJAX-specific methods like .done(). – Barmar Jun 27 '13 at 8:16
    
i tried it and but it still fires before all the ajax has finished – Jon Snow Jun 27 '13 at 8:53

Your approach produces a whole lot of more server requests and will scale terribly. Since you want to wait for all results anyway, a much better solution would be to collect all data and send only one ajax request which returns an array of results for each data object.

Using a deferred object (as seen in other answers) then gives you the ability to use that result in a when statement.

share|improve this answer

try to use a callback-function in success:

var order = [];

function sub(selector, callback){

selector.each(function(){
    var out = {
        "some":"random",
        "stuff":"here"
    };
        $.ajax({
            type: "POST" 
            url: "/test/url",
            dataType: 'json',
            contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
            data:JSON.stringify(out),
            success:function(response){
                $(this).attr("data-response",response);
                order.push(response);
                callback();
            }
        })
    })
}

$("#button").click(function(){
    sub($(".test"), function() { console.log(order) });
});
share|improve this answer

Add attribute async : false to your $.ajax - call. Then the calls are made in sequence after eachother.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a bad solution - there is a very good reason to use async calls. – Tomer Arazy Jun 27 '13 at 8:15
    
that would make things even slower – Alp Jun 27 '13 at 8:16
    
Yes it would make it slower. I just answered the question and it will work. If peformance is an issue OP should rewrite the code so only one server request is done for each function call(if possible) – bestprogrammerintheworld Jun 27 '13 at 8:25

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