Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have this simple code which start a method asynchronously. it uses TCS in order to wrap the code with Task.

Task<int> DoWork()
{
    var source = new TaskCompletionSource <int>();
    Thread.Sleep(220);
    source.SetResult(9999999);
    return source.Task;
}

void Main()
{
    Console.WriteLine(1);

    var t1=Task.Factory.StartNew(()=>DoWork());
    t1.ContinueWith(_=>Console.WriteLine ("doing something different "));
    t1.ContinueWith(_=>Console.WriteLine ("finished , value is ="+_.Result.Result));

    Console.WriteLine(2);
    Console.ReadLine();
}

output :

1
2
doing somethign different  //those last 2 lines can be swapped
finished , value is =9999999

But now , I want to convert it to use Task.FromResult<TResult>.

This is poorly documented , so I wonder , how can I convert my code above to use Task.FroResult instead ?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The easiest way to use FromResult would be to do:

public Task<int> DoWork()
{
    return Task.FromResult(99999);
}

But it's an exact functional equivalent of doing:

var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<int>();
tcs.SetResult(99999);
return tcs.Task;

so it doesn't sleep for 220 ms. For the 'delayed' variant, easiest way would be:

public async Task<int> DoWork()
{
    await Task.Delay(220);
    return 99999;
}

and this version behaves close enough to the example you provided.

share|improve this answer
1  
Actually it is not like my example . Myne has a blocked thread somewhere due to sleep, while yours doesnt since task. Delay uses timer which is not blocking – Royi Namir Jun 27 '13 at 9:20
1  
@RoyiNamir True enough, it's asynchronous wait, not blocking wait, but since you're now playing with async&await, a general rule of the tumb is that you should not wait synchronously. Unless you want to spend time solving deadlocks :) – Patryk Ćwiek Jun 27 '13 at 9:32
1  
@PatrykĆwiek Yes, but that doesn't mean you should say that is behaves exactly the same. – svick Jun 27 '13 at 12:49
    
@svick Right, you're technically correct (the best kind of correct). I have made a small edit to reflect that. :) – Patryk Ćwiek Jun 27 '13 at 12:51

In your code, you return the Task only after the synchronous wait is over, so your code is equivalent to:

Task<int> DoWork()
{
    Thread.Sleep(220);
    return Task.FromResult(9999999);
}

But if you returned the Task immediately and then blocked some other thread:

Task<int> DoWork()
{
    var source = new TaskCompletionSource<int>();
    Task.Run(() =>
    {
        Thread.Sleep(220);
        source.SetResult(9999999);
    });
    return source.Task;
}

(Note: I'm not saying you should do this in real code.)

This code couldn't be simulated by Task.FromResult(), because that always creates an already completed Task.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.