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PHP treats all arrays as associative, so there aren't any built in functions. Can anyone recommend a fairly efficient way to check if an array contains only numeric keys?

Basically, I want to be able to differentiate between this:

$sequentialArray = array('apple', 'orange', 'tomato', 'carrot');

and this:

$assocArray = array('fruit1' => 'apple', 
                    'fruit2' => 'orange', 
                    'veg1' => 'tomato', 
                    'veg2' => 'carrot');
share|improve this question
20  
There's a bug in your code: Tomato is a fruit. – Olle Härstedt Mar 2 at 14:19
    
This method has caveats, but often I just do if (isset($array[0])), which is simple and fast. Of course, you should first be sure the array isn't empty, and you should have some knowledge on the possible contents of the array so that the method couldn't fail (like mixed numeric/associative, or non-sequential). – Gras Double Mar 12 at 17:58

42 Answers 42

up vote 307 down vote accepted

You have asked two questions that are not quite equivalent:

  • Firstly, how to determine whether an array has only numeric keys
  • Secondly, how to determine whether an array has sequential numeric keys, starting from 0

Consider which of these behaviours you actually need. (It may be that either will do for your purposes.)

The first question (simply checking that all keys are numeric) is answered well by Captain kurO.

For the second question (checking whether the array is zero-indexed and sequential), you can use the following function:

function isAssoc($arr)
{
    return array_keys($arr) !== range(0, count($arr) - 1);
}

var_dump(isAssoc(array('a', 'b', 'c'))); // false
var_dump(isAssoc(array("0" => 'a', "1" => 'b', "2" => 'c'))); // false
var_dump(isAssoc(array("1" => 'a', "0" => 'b', "2" => 'c'))); // true
var_dump(isAssoc(array("a" => 'a', "b" => 'b', "c" => 'c'))); // true
share|improve this answer
9  
Very elegant solution. Note that it returns TRUE in the (ambiguous) case of an empty array. – Jonathan Lidbeck Jan 8 at 0:09
4  
I think it is more useful to think of sequential arrays as a special case of associative arrays. So every array is associative, but only some are sequential. Therefore, a function isSequential() would make more sense than isAssoc(). In such a function, the empty array should be seen as sequential. The formula could be array() === $arr || !isAssoc($arr). – donquixote Feb 21 at 2:03

To merely check whether the array has non-integer keys (not whether the array is sequentially-indexed or zero-indexed):

function has_string_keys(array $array) {
  return count(array_filter(array_keys($array), 'is_string')) > 0;
}

If there is at least one string key, $array will be regarded as an associative array.

share|improve this answer
11  
This method is much better than it seems. If count(filtered_array) == count(original_array), then it is an assoc array. If count(filtered_array) == 0, then it is an indexed array. If count(filtered_array) < count(original_array), then the array has both numeric and string keys. – jamolkhon Jan 31 '12 at 13:31
    
Way to slow. This will iterate and apply a function. Look below for faster alternatives or simply check the first key for being int. – Mike Pretzlaw Jan 18 '14 at 19:27
    
This returns false for ["1" => "foo", 2, 3]. Is there really no way to check if a key was originally defined as a string? PHP seems to cast everything to an int in an array definition if it can. Brutal. – ARW Jul 13 '14 at 14:55
4  
@MikePretzlaw of course it iterates; there is (obviously) no possible way to determine whether all the keys of the array are ints without looking at all the keys in the array. I assume the non-iterating alternatives we're supposed to be seeing below are ones like $isIndexed = array_values($arr) === $arr;? To which I ask: how do you think array_values() works? How do you think === applied to arrays works? The answer is of course that they also iterate over the array. – Mark Amery Dec 25 '15 at 16:25
4  
@MarkAmery The above, while simple, guarantees a 100% walk of the array. It would be more efficient, especially if you're dealing with large arrays, if you were checking for string or int and broke out on the first you found. For instance: function isAssociative($arr) { foreach ($arr as $key => $value) { if (is_string($key)) return true; } return false; } – Thought Feb 18 at 17:27

Surely this is a better alternative.

<?php
$arr = array(1,2,3,4);
$isIndexed = array_values($arr) === $arr;
share|improve this answer
32  
This will duplicate the values in the array, which is potentially very expensive. You're much better off examining the array keys. – meagar Jan 20 '11 at 15:47
8  
I just used ==; I don't think there is a need for === here. But to answer the "unset and it doesn't work": once you unset the first element, it's no longer an integer-indexed array starting at 0. So IMO it does work. – grantwparks Aug 2 '12 at 21:32
4  
Agree with @grantwparks: A sparse array isn't indexed. Interestingly because there's no way to actually delete an element out of the middle of an indexed array PHP is basically declaring all arrays as associative and numeric is just a 'make up the key for me' version. – RickMeasham Jan 14 '13 at 1:01
4  
The only problem I have with this is that the === will waste time checking if the values are equal, even though we are only interested in the keys. For this reason I prefer the $k = array_keys( $arr ); return $k === array_keys( $k ); version. – Jesse Jan 20 '13 at 7:05
2  
An added note, this fails on arrays specified with numeric keys that are out of order. e.g. $myArr = array ( 0 => 'a', 3 => 'b', 4 => 1, 2 => 2, 1 => '3' ); One potential work around is running ksort($arr) before doing the test – Scott Jun 5 '13 at 21:58

Many commenters in this question don't understand how arrays work in PHP. From the array documentation:

A key may be either an integer or a string. If a key is the standard representation of an integer, it will be interpreted as such (i.e. "8" will be interpreted as 8, while "08" will be interpreted as "08"). Floats in key are truncated to integer. The indexed and associative array types are the same type in PHP, which can both contain integer and string indices.

In other words, there is no such thing as an array key of "8" because it will always be (silently) converted to the integer 8. So trying to differentiate between integers and numeric strings is unnecessary.

If you want the most efficient way to check an array for non-integer keys without making a copy of part of the array (like array_keys() does) or all of it (like foreach does):

for (reset($my_array); is_int(key($my_array)); next($my_array));
$onlyIntKeys = is_null(key($my_array));

This works because key() returns NULL when the current array position is invalid and NULL can never be a valid key (if you try to use NULL as an array key it gets silently converted to "").

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work for non-sequential integer keys. Try it with [2 => 'a', 4 => 'b']. – DavidJ Sep 4 '12 at 12:29
1  
@DavidJ, What do you mean by "doesn't work"? It successfully determines that all the keys are integers. Are you claiming that an array like the one you posted shouldn't be considered a "numeric array"? – CoreDumpError Mar 16 '13 at 0:29
6  
A non-associative array must have keys ranging from 0 to count($array)-1, in this strict order. A preliminary check with is_array() may help. Add an increasing variable to check the key sequence: for ($k = 0, reset($array) ; $k === key($array) ; next($array)) ++$k; That settles the deal. – ofavre Jun 25 '13 at 15:52
2  
Using foreach instead of explicit iteration is about twice faster. – ofavre Jun 26 '13 at 9:06
1  
If you want to make this into a function: function isAssocStr($array) { for (reset($array); is_int(key($array)); next($array)) { if (is_null(key($array))) return false; } return true; } – GreeKatrina Feb 18 '15 at 17:15

As stated by the OP:

PHP treats all arrays as associative

it is not quite sensible (IMHO) to write a function that checks if an array is associative. So first thing first: what is a key in a PHP array?:

The key can either be an integer or a string.

That means there are 3 possible cases:

  • Case 1. all keys are numeric / integers.
  • Case 2. all keys are strings.
  • Case 3. some keys are strings, some keys are numeric / integers.

We can check each case with the following functions.

Case 1: all keys are numeric / integers.

Note: This function returns true for empty arrays too.

//! Check whether the input is an array whose keys are all integers.
/*!
    \param[in] $InputArray          (array) Input array.
    \return                         (bool) \b true iff the input is an array whose keys are all integers.
*/
function IsArrayAllKeyInt($InputArray)
{
    if(!is_array($InputArray))
    {
        return false;
    }

    if(count($InputArray) <= 0)
    {
        return true;
    }

    return array_unique(array_map("is_int", array_keys($InputArray))) === array(true);
}

Case 2: all keys are strings.

Note: This function returns true for empty arrays too.

//! Check whether the input is an array whose keys are all strings.
/*!
    \param[in] $InputArray          (array) Input array.
    \return                         (bool) \b true iff the input is an array whose keys are all strings.
*/
function IsArrayAllKeyString($InputArray)
{
    if(!is_array($InputArray))
    {
        return false;
    }

    if(count($InputArray) <= 0)
    {
        return true;
    }

    return array_unique(array_map("is_string", array_keys($InputArray))) === array(true);
}

Case 3. some keys are strings, some keys are numeric / integers.

Note: This function returns true for empty arrays too.

//! Check whether the input is an array with at least one key being an integer and at least one key being a string.
/*!
    \param[in] $InputArray          (array) Input array.
    \return                         (bool) \b true iff the input is an array with at least one key being an integer and at least one key being a string.
*/
function IsArraySomeKeyIntAndSomeKeyString($InputArray)
{
    if(!is_array($InputArray))
    {
        return false;
    }

    if(count($InputArray) <= 0)
    {
        return true;
    }

    return count(array_unique(array_map("is_string", array_keys($InputArray)))) >= 2;
}

It follows that:


Now, for an array to be a "genuine" array that we are all accustomed to, meaning:

  • Its keys are all numeric / integers.
  • Its keys are sequential (i.e. increasing by step 1).
  • Its keys start from zero.

We can check with the following function.

Case 3a. keys are numeric / integers, sequential, and zero-based.

Note: This function returns true for empty arrays too.

//! Check whether the input is an array whose keys are numeric, sequential, and zero-based.
/*!
    \param[in] $InputArray          (array) Input array.
    \return                         (bool) \b true iff the input is an array whose keys are numeric, sequential, and zero-based.
*/
function IsArrayKeyNumericSequentialZeroBased($InputArray)
{
    if(!is_array($InputArray))
    {
        return false;
    }

    if(count($InputArray) <= 0)
    {
        return true;
    }

    return array_keys($InputArray) === range(0, count($InputArray) - 1);
}

Caveats / Pitfalls (or, even more peculiar facts about array keys in PHP)

Integer keys

The keys for these arrays are integers:

array(0 => "b");
array(13 => "b");
array(-13 => "b");          // Negative integers are also integers.
array(0x1A => "b");         // Hexadecimal notation.

String keys

The keys for these arrays are strings:

array("fish and chips" => "b");
array("" => "b");                                   // An empty string is also a string.
array("stackoverflow_email@example.com" => "b");    // Strings may contain non-alphanumeric characters.
array("stack\t\"over\"\r\nflow's cool" => "b");     // Strings may contain special characters.
array('$tα€k↔øv∈rflöw⛄' => "b");                    // Strings may contain all kinds of symbols.
array("functіon" => "b");                           // You think this looks fine? Think again! (see http://stackoverflow.com/q/9246051/1402846)
array("ま말轉转ДŁ" => "b");                         // How about Japanese/Korean/Chinese/Russian/Polish?
array("fi\x0sh" => "b");                            // Strings may contain null characters.
array(file_get_contents("https://www.google.com/images/nav_logo114.png") => "b");   // Strings may even be binary!

Integer keys that look like strings

If you think the key in array("13" => "b") is a string, you are wrong. From the doc here:

Strings containing valid integers will be cast to the integer type. E.g. the key "8" will actually be stored under 8. On the other hand "08" will not be cast, as it isn't a valid decimal integer.

For example, the key for these arrays are integers:

array("13" => "b");
array("-13" => "b");                        // Negative, ok.

But the key for these arrays are strings:

array("13." => "b");
array("+13" => "b");                        // Positive, not ok.
array("-013" => "b");
array("0x1A" => "b");                       // Not converted to integers even though it's a valid hexadecimal number.
array("013" => "b");                        // Not converted to integers even though it's a valid octal number.
array("18446744073709551616" => "b");       // Not converted to integers as it can't fit into a 64-bit integer.

What's more, according to the doc,

The size of an integer is platform-dependent, although a maximum value of about two billion is the usual value (that's 32 bits signed). 64-bit platforms usually have a maximum value of about 9E18, except for Windows, which is always 32 bit. PHP does not support unsigned integers.

So the key for this array may or may not be an integer - it depends on your platform.

array("60000000000" => "b");                // Array key could be integer or string, it can fit into a 64-bit (but not 32-bit) integer.

Even worse, PHP tends to be buggy if the integer is near the 231 = 2,147,483,648 boundary (see bug 51430, bug 52899). For example, on my local environment (PHP 5.3.8 on XAMPP 1.7.7 on Windows 7), var_dump(array("2147483647" => "b")) gives

array(1) {
    [2147483647]=>
    string(1) "b"
}   

but on this live demo on codepad (PHP 5.2.5), the same expression gives

array(1) {
    ["2147483647"]=>
    string(1) "b"
}

So the key is an integer in one environment but a string in another, even though 2147483647 is a valid signed 32-bit integer.

share|improve this answer
1  
Except, as I mention below, it involves creating a duplicate array to the one being checked, making it very expensive for large arrays, and a potential source of out of memory crashes on shared hosts. – podperson Jun 2 '15 at 15:48

Speed-wise:

function isAssoc($array)
{
    return ($array !== array_values($array));
}

Memory-wise:

function isAssoc($array)
{
    $array = array_keys($array); return ($array !== array_keys($array));
}
share|improve this answer
5  
Here is a performance benchmark for the above: gist.github.com/1965669 – Artur Bodera Mar 3 '12 at 13:44
    
the following array: array(02=>11,1,2,456); is shown as not having numerical keys using the above algorithm, even if 02===2 – Galileo_Galilei Nov 18 '15 at 9:50
function checkAssoc($array){
    return  ctype_digit( implode('', array_keys($array) ) );
}
share|improve this answer
2  
This is the only answer (at the time of my comment) that can deal with the following: $array = array(0=>'blah', 2=>'yep', 3=>'wahey') – Shabbyrobe Aug 3 '10 at 11:01
7  
Does that work if one of the keys is the empty string? – Donal Fellows Feb 9 '11 at 13:30
    
but array('1'=>'asdf', '2'=>'too') will be regarded as associative array while it's actually not (the keys are actually string) – Captain kurO Apr 14 '11 at 7:41
1  
@CaptainkurO You mean numerical. It is an associative array. – devios Feb 21 '12 at 16:51
1  
This function returns true if the keys are: zero, integers (positive only), an empty string, or any combination of the above, such as the string "09". This function does not take the order of the keys into account. So array(0=>'blah', 2=>'yep', 3=>'wahey'), array(0=>'blah', 2=>'yep', 1=>'wahey') and array('blah', 'yep', 'wahey') are all associative according to this function, while array('a'=>'blah', 'b'=>'yep', 'c'=>'wahey') is not. – Pang Nov 23 '12 at 1:23

I've used both array_keys($obj) !== range(0, count($obj) - 1) and array_values($arr) !== $arr (which are duals of each other, although the second is cheaper than the first) but both fail for very large arrays.

This is because array_keys and array_values are both very costly operations (since they build a whole new array of size roughly that of the original).

The following function is more robust than the methods provided above:

function array_type( $obj ){
    $last_key = -1;
    $type = 'index';
    foreach( $obj as $key => $val ){
        if( !is_int( $key ) || $key < 0 ){
            return 'assoc';
        }
        if( $key !== $last_key + 1 ){
            $type = 'sparse';
        }
        $last_key = $key;
    }
    return $type;
}

Also note that if you don't care to differentiate sparse arrays from associative arrays you can simply return 'assoc' from both if blocks.

Finally, while this might seem much less "elegant" than a lot of "solutions" on this page, in practice it is vastly more efficient. Almost any associative array will be detected instantly. Only indexed arrays will get checked exhaustively, and the methods outlined above not only check indexed arrays exhaustively, they duplicate them.

share|improve this answer

Actually the most efficient way is thus:

function is_assoc($array){
   $keys = array_keys($array);
   return $keys !== array_keys($keys);
}

This works because it compares the keys (which for a sequential array are always 0,1,2 etc) to the keys of the keys (which will always be 0,1,2 etc).

share|improve this answer
    
Clever, but not good. Why is this "most efficient"? It would be a lot more readable to just compare the array_keys($a) to range(0, count($a)). The most clever solution is rarely the best one in my experience. Especially when being clever adds literally no value over the obvious and clean alternative. – Shane H Jul 31 '12 at 1:45
3  
This function returns true for array(1=>"a") but false for array("a"=>"a"). Would be more meaningful if != is replaced by !==. – Pang Nov 23 '12 at 1:38
1  
@Pang you are correct. I thought your comment must surely be wrong at first, but, to my surprise, [0] == ['a'] in PHP (since 0 == 'a', and, indeed, 0 == 'banana'). PHP's == operator is insane. – Mark Amery Jan 1 at 23:59

I think the following two functions are the best way to go for checking 'if an array is associative or numeric'. Since 'numeric' could mean only numeric keys or only sequential numeric keys, two functions are listed below that check either condition:

function is_indexed_array(&$arr) {
  for (reset($arr); is_int(key($arr)); next($arr));
  return is_null(key($arr));
}

function is_sequential_array(&$arr, $base = 0) {
  for (reset($arr), $base = (int) $base; key($arr) === $base++; next($arr));
  return is_null(key($arr));
}

The first function checks if each key is an integer value. The second function checks if each key is an integer value and in addition checks if all keys are sequential starting at $base, which defaults to 0 and thus can be omitted if you do not need to specify another base value. key($my_array) returns null if the read pointer is moved past the end of the array, which is what ends the for loop and makes the statement after the for loop return true if all keys were integer. If not, the loop ends prematurely because a key is of type string, and the statement after the for loop will return false. The latter function in addition adds one to $base after each compare, to be able to check if the next key is of the correct value. The strict compare makes it also check if the key is of type integer. The $base = (int) $base part in the first section of the for loop can be left out when $base is omitted or if you make sure it is only called using an integer. But since I can't be sure for everybody, I left it in. The statement is executed only once, anyway. I think these are the most efficient solutions:

  • Memory wise: No copying of data or key ranges. Doing an array_values or array_keys may seem shorter (less code) but keep in mind what goes on in the background once you make that call. Yes there are more (visible) statements than in some other solutions, but that is not what counts, is it?
  • Time wise: Besides the fact that copying/extracting data and/or keys also takes time, this solution is more efficient than doing a foreach. Again a foreach may seem more efficient to some because it is shorter in notation, but in the background foreach also calls reset, key and next to do it's looping. But in addition it also calls valid to check the end condition, which is avoided here due to the combination with the integer check.

Remember that an array key can only be an integer or a string, and a strictly numeric string such as "1" (but not "01") will be translated into an integer. Which is what makes checking for an integer key the only needed operation besides counting if you want the array to be sequential. Naturally, if is_indexed_array returns false the array can be seen as associative. I say 'seen', because in fact they all are.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is the best answer. The definition of "associative" or "numeric" array depends on the specific situation. – Pato May 2 '13 at 18:38

This function can handle:

  • array with holes in index (e.g. 1,2,4,5,8,10)
  • array with "0x" keys: e.g. key '08' is associative while key '8' is sequential.

the idea is simple: if one of the keys is NOT an integer, it is associative array, otherwise it's sequential.

function is_asso($a){
    foreach(array_keys($a) as $key) {if (!is_int($key)) return TRUE;}
    return FALSE;
}
share|improve this answer
    
"if one of the keys is NOT an integer, it is associative array, otherwise it's sequential" - huh? No, this is simply wrong. There's room for argument over what constitutes an "associative" array, but the meaning of "sequential" is pretty unambiguous, and it's not the same as all keys being numbers. – Mark Amery Jan 2 at 16:39

I noticed two popular approaches for this question: one using array_values() and other using key(). To find out which is faster, I wrote a small program:

$arrays = Array(
  'Array #1' => Array(1, 2, 3, 54, 23, 212, 123, 1, 1),
  'Array #2' => Array("Stack", 1.5, 20, Array(3.4)),
  'Array #3' => Array(1 => 4, 2 => 2),
  'Array #4' => Array(3.0, "2", 3000, "Stack", 5 => "4"),
  'Array #5' => Array("3" => 4, "2" => 2),
  'Array #6' => Array("0" => "One", 1.0 => "Two", 2 => "Three"),
  'Array #7' => Array(3 => "asdf", 4 => "asdf"),
  'Array #8' => Array("apple" => 1, "orange" => 2),
);

function is_indexed_array_1(Array &$arr) {
  return $arr === array_values($arr);
}

function is_indexed_array_2(Array &$arr) {
  for (reset($arr), $i = 0; key($arr) === $i++; next($arr))
    ;
  return is_null(key($arr));
}

// Method #1
$start = microtime(true);
for ($i = 0; $i < 1000; $i++) {
  foreach ($arrays as $array) {
    $dummy = is_indexed_array_1($array);
  }
}
$end = microtime(true);
echo "Time taken with method #1 = ".round(($end-$start)*1000.0,3)."ms\n";

// Method #2
$start = microtime(true);
for ($i = 0; $i < 1000; $i++) {
  foreach ($arrays as $array) {
    $dummy = is_indexed_array_2($array);
  }
}
$end = microtime(true);
echo "Time taken with method #1 = ".round(($end-$start)*1000.0,3)."ms\n";

Output for the program on PHP 5.2 on CentOS is as follows:

Time taken with method #1 = 10.745ms
Time taken with method #2 = 18.239ms

Output on PHP 5.3 yielded similar results. Obviously using array_values() is much faster.

share|improve this answer
    
bad benchmark. You didn't test for big arrays. On my computer starting at 10K+ elements method #2 is faster. Try with $arrays = Array( 'Array #1' => range(0, 50000), ); – nonsensei Jul 4 at 11:07
    
@nonsensei Share your findings / benchmark results – Manu M. Jul 6 at 4:56
    

Unless PHP has a builtin for that, you won't be able to do it in less than O(n) - enumerating over all the keys and checking for integer type. In fact, you also want to make sure there are no holes, so your algorithm might look like:

for i in 0 to len(your_array):
    if not defined(your-array[i]):
        # this is not an array array, it's an associative array :)

But why bother? Just assume the array is of the type you expect. If it isn't, it will just blow up in your face - that's dynamic programming for you! Test your code and all will be well...

share|improve this answer
    
Normally just assuming the array is the desired type would be the way to go. But in my case I'm looping through a multidimensional array and am formatting the output depending on which type of array a given node is. – Wilco Oct 6 '08 at 7:24

This would work too (demo):

function array_has_numeric_keys_only(array $array)
{
    try {
        SplFixedArray::fromArray($array, true);
    } catch (InvalidArgumentException $e) {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

Please note that the main point of this answer is to inform you about the existence of SplFixedArray and not to encourage you to use Exceptions for these kinds of tests.

share|improve this answer

By using xarray PHP extension

You can do this very fast (about 30+ times faster in PHP 5.6):

if (array_is_indexed($array)) {  }

Or:

if (array_is_assoc($array)) {  }
share|improve this answer

Here's the method I use:

function is_associative ( $a )
{
    return in_array(false, array_map('is_numeric', array_keys($a)));
}

assert( true === is_associative(array(1, 2, 3, 4)) );

assert( false === is_associative(array('foo' => 'bar', 'bar' => 'baz')) );

assert( false === is_associative(array(1, 2, 3, 'foo' => 'bar')) );

Note that this doesn't account for special cases like:

$a = array( 1, 2, 3, 4 );

unset($a[1]);

assert( true === is_associative($a) );

Sorry, can't help you with that. It's also somewhat performant for decently sized arrays, as it doesn't make needless copies. It is these little things that makes Python and Ruby so much nicer to write in... :P

share|improve this answer
<?php

function is_list($array) {
    return array_keys($array) === range(0, count($array) - 1);
}

function is_assoc($array) {
    return count(array_filter(array_keys($array), 'is_string')) == count($array);
}

?>

Both of these examples, which scored the most points do not work correctly with arrays like $array = array('foo' => 'bar', 1)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Your is_list() is IMO the best answer. Some people don't have a clue about time & space complexity, and native vs PHP scripted function... – ringø Nov 16 '12 at 15:00

I think the definition of a scalar array will vary by application. That is, some applications will require a more strict sense of what qualifies as a scalar array, and some applications will require a more loose sense.

Below I present 3 methods of varying strictness.

<?php
/**
 * Since PHP stores all arrays as associative internally, there is no proper
 * definition of a scalar array.
 * 
 * As such, developers are likely to have varying definitions of scalar array,
 * based on their application needs.
 * 
 * In this file, I present 3 increasingly strict methods of determining if an
 * array is scalar.
 * 
 * @author David Farrell <DavidPFarrell@gmail.com>
 */

/**
 * isArrayWithOnlyIntKeys defines a scalar array as containing
 * only integer keys.
 * 
 * If you are explicitly setting integer keys on an array, you
 * may need this function to determine scalar-ness.
 * 
 * @param array $a
 * @return boolean
 */ 
function isArrayWithOnlyIntKeys(array $a)
{
    if (!is_array($a))
        return false;
    foreach ($a as $k => $v)
        if (!is_int($k))
            return false;
    return true;
}

/**
 * isArrayWithOnlyAscendingIntKeys defines a scalar array as
 * containing only integer keys in ascending (but not necessarily
 * sequential) order.
 * 
 * If you are performing pushes, pops, and unsets on your array,
 * you may need this function to determine scalar-ness.
 * 
 * @param array $a
 * @return boolean
 */ 
function isArrayWithOnlyAscendingIntKeys(array $a)
{
    if (!is_array($a))
        return false;
    $prev = null;
    foreach ($a as $k => $v)
    {
        if (!is_int($k) || (null !== $prev && $k <= $prev))
            return false;
        $prev = $k;
    }
    return true;
}

/**
 * isArrayWithOnlyZeroBasedSequentialIntKeys defines a scalar array
 * as containing only integer keys in sequential, ascending order,
 * starting from 0.
 * 
 * If you are only performing operations on your array that are
 * guaranteed to either maintain consistent key values, or that
 * re-base the keys for consistency, then you can use this function.
 * 
 * @param array $a
 * @return boolean
 */
function isArrayWithOnlyZeroBasedSequentialIntKeys(array $a)
{
    if (!is_array($a))
        return false;
    $i = 0;
    foreach ($a as $k => $v)
        if ($i++ !== $k)
            return false;
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer

Could this be the solution?

  public static function isArrayAssociative(array $array) {
      reset($array);
      return !is_int(key($array));
  }

The caveat is obviously that the array cursor is reset but I'd say probably the function is used before the array is even traversed or used.

share|improve this answer
    
This function returns false for both array("a", "b") and array("a", "b" => "B") as it only checks the first key. BTW, is_long is just an alias of is_int. – Pang Nov 24 '12 at 2:20
1  
quite frankly I think this would be very effective in the vast majority of cases, and is far more efficient than the alternatives. If you understand the consequences of this method, and realize it will work for you, it's likely the best choice. – Gershom Maes Jan 30 '15 at 19:58
    
This is simply wrong; it only looks at the first key. – Mark Amery Jan 2 at 16:59
    
@MarkAmery the question asked how to differentiate purely sequential arrays from purely associative arrays. This answer does exactly that and is the most efficient of them all. Having undefined behavior for mixed arrrays is perfectly fine in the context of the question. +1 – Tobia Jul 20 at 8:30
    
@Tobia I don't think most people would agree with you classifying, say, [7 => 'foo', 2 => 'bar'] as a "mixed" array that is partly but not "purely" sequential. That seems like a plainly incorrect use of words to me. – Mark Amery Jul 20 at 8:57

My solution:

function isAssociative(array $array)
{
    return array_keys(array_merge($array)) !== range(0, count($array) - 1);
}

array_merge on a single array will reindex all integer keys, but not other. For example:

array_merge([1 => 'One', 3 => 'Three', 'two' => 'Two', 6 => 'Six']);

// This will returns [0 => 'One', 1 => 'Three', 'two' => 'Two', 2 => 'Six']

So if a list (a non-associative array) is created ['a', 'b', 'c'] then a value is removed unset($a[1]) then array_merge is called, the list is reindexed starting from 0.

share|improve this answer
    
-1; this is O(n) in additional memory used (since it created multiple new arrays with as many elements as $array), the answer doesn't address the ambiguity of the question that was asked nor explain exactly how it's defining a list / non-associative array, and even if neither of these points were true it's unclear that this adds any value compared to other answers already posted. – Mark Amery Jan 6 at 23:46

I know it's a bit pointless adding an answer to this huge queue, but here's a readable O(n) solution that doesn't require duplicating any values:

function isNumericArray($array) {
    $count = count($array);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $count; $i++) {
        if (!isset($array[$i])) {
            return FALSE;
        }
    }
    return TRUE;
}

Rather than check the keys to see if they are all numeric, you iterate over the keys that would be there for a numeric array and make sure they exist.

share|improve this answer
    
one more point. array in form [1,2,null,4] will fail, but it is correct array. so i've added some enhancement at stackoverflow.com/a/25206156/501831 with addition array_key_exists check) – lazycommit Aug 8 '14 at 18:14
    
-1; isset() is the wrong tool here because it will return false if the value is set but is null, as pointed out by @lazycommit. – Mark Amery Jan 2 at 16:55

One more fast from source. Fit encoding of json_encode (and bson_encode). So has javascript Array compliance.

function isSequential($value){
    if(is_array($value) || ($value instanceof \Countable && $value instanceof \ArrayAccess)){
        for ($i = count($value) - 1; $i >= 0; $i--) {
            if (!isset($value[$i]) && !array_key_exists($i, $value)) {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    } else {
        throw new \InvalidArgumentException(
            sprintf('Data type "%s" is not supported by method %s', gettype($value), __METHOD__)
        );
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Why isset and array_key_exists? wouldn't the latter be enough? – mcfedr Jun 30 '15 at 21:33
    
@mcfedr yes, it would - the isset() check here is completely redundant. – Mark Amery Jan 2 at 16:58
    
@mcfedr, @mark-amery because of performance reasons. isset() is faster than array_key_exists(). see ilia.ws/archives/… – lazycommit Jan 29 at 7:58
    
@lazycommit Its going to depend on your array then on whether its better with or without, not that its likely to have an array with lots of nulls, but then its also not that likely you have array large enough that there would be noticeable performance difference by using both checks – mcfedr Jan 29 at 8:25
    
@mcfedr agree. bad data structure control means pure design and bad code smell. So, the thread is all about :) – lazycommit May 12 at 13:22
function array_is_assoc(array $a) {
    $i = 0;
    foreach ($a as $k => $v) {
        if ($k !== $i++) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

Fast, concise, and memory efficient. No expensive comparisons, function calls or array copying.

share|improve this answer

I compare the difference between the keys of the array and the keys of the result of array_values() of the array, which will always be an array with integer indices. If the keys are the same, it's not an associative array.

function isHash($array) {
    if (!is_array($array)) return false;
    $diff = array_diff_assoc($array, array_values($array));
    return (empty($diff)) ? false : true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1; this uses O(n) additional memory when $array has n items, and writing (someboolean) ? false : true instead of !someboolean is horrible and gratuitously verbose. – Mark Amery Jan 6 at 23:54

Modification on the most popular answer.
This takes a little more processing, but is more accurate.

<?php
//$a is a subset of $b
function isSubset($a, $b)
{
    foreach($a =>$v)
        if(array_search($v, $b) === false)
            return false;

    return true;

    //less effecient, clearer implementation. (uses === for comparison)
    //return array_intersect($a, $b) === $a;
}

function isAssoc($arr)
{
    return !isSubset(array_keys($arr), range(0, count($arr) - 1));
}

var_dump(isAssoc(array('a', 'b', 'c'))); // false
var_dump(isAssoc(array(1 => 'a', 0 => 'b', 2 => 'c'))); // false
var_dump(isAssoc(array("0" => 'a', "1" => 'b', "2" => 'c'))); // false 
//(use === in isSubset to get 'true' for above statement)
var_dump(isAssoc(array("a" => 'a', "b" => 'b', "c" => 'c'))); // true
?>
share|improve this answer
    
-1; this will take O(n²) time to complete given a sequential array of size n. That's going to be horribly inefficient for large enough arrays. – Mark Amery Jan 2 at 17:08

In my opinion, an array should be accepted as associative if any of its keys is not integer e.g. float numbers and empty string ''.

Also non-sequenced integers has to be seen as associative like (0,2,4,6) because these kind of arrays cannot be used with for loops by this way:

$n =count($arr);
for($i=0,$i<$n;$i++) 

The second part of the function below does check if the keys are indexed or not.It also works for keys with negative values. For example (-1,0,1,2,3,4,5)

count() = 7 , max = 5, min=-1



if( 7 == (5-(-1)+1 ) // true
    return false; // array not associative


/** 
 * isAssoc Checks if an array is associative
 * @param $arr reference to the array to be checked
 * @return bool 
 */     
function IsAssoc(&$arr){
    $keys= array_keys($arr);
    foreach($keys as $key){
        if (!is_integer($key))
            return true;
    }
    // if all keys are integer then check if they are indexed
    if(count($arr) == (max($keys)-min($keys)+1))
        return false;
    else
        return true;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
1. IsAssoc() returns false for non-zero-based arrays, e.g. array(91 => "a") (as stated in the answer). 2. IsAssoc() returns false even if the array keys are not in order, e.g. array(1 => "a", 0 => "b", 2 => "c"). – Pang Nov 24 '12 at 2:32
    
-1; your reasoning here doesn't really make sense. If, as you suggest here, you want to be able to loop over the array using a conventional for loop with $i as a loop variable ranging from 0 to count($arr) - 1, then the array needs to be zero-indexed, not merely sequentially-indexed. Yet your code merely checks that the array is sequentially-indexed. – Mark Amery Jan 2 at 17:18
function is_array_assoc($foo) {
    if (is_array($foo)) {
        return (count(array_filter(array_keys($foo), 'is_string')) > 0);
    }
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 for the total lack of explanation. Dumping another code sample on a question that has had 42 answers without any explanation of why to prefer it over the alternatives helps absolutely nobody. Also, given the question's ambiguity and the arguments that have raged over it in the comments, some explanation of exactly how you're defining a "associative" or "sequential" array seems necessary here. – Mark Amery Jan 6 at 23:56
function is_associative($arr) {
  return (array_merge($arr) !== $arr || count(array_filter($arr, 'is_string', ARRAY_FILTER_USE_KEY)) > 0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
implode takes 2 arguments, plus, that function would return false for an array defined like this: $x = array("1" => "b", "0" => "a"); – nickf Oct 6 '08 at 7:20
2  
The glue parameter of implode() became optional in PHP 4.3.0. Your example array -- $x = array("1" => "b", "0" => "a"); -- has an associative index of non-sequential strings. is_associative() will return true for that array, as expected. – scronide Oct 6 '08 at 7:56
1  
I like this one. The first conditional will detect associative arrays where numeric indices are not numerically sequential, or where the first index is not "0", because array_merge will re-index keys of a numerically indexed (but possibly associative) array. – DWright Nov 10 '10 at 18:30
1  
-1; this uses O(n) additional memory when $arr has n items, plus there's no explanation of what it does nor exploration of the ambiguity of the question that was asked. It also treats an array that has sequential numeric keys and the empty string as a key as non-associative, which defies any sane definition one might draw up between an 'associative' and 'sequential' array. – Mark Amery Jan 6 at 23:49
    
@MarkAmery Interesting point about the empty string as a key. – scronide Jan 7 at 0:25

answers are already given but there's too much disinformation about performance. I wrote this little benchmark script that shows that the foreach method is the fastest.

Disclaimer: following methods were copy-pasted from the other answers

<?php

function method_1(Array &$arr) {
    return $arr === array_values($arr);
}

function method_2(Array &$arr) {
    for (reset($arr), $i = 0; key($arr) !== $i++; next($arr));
    return is_null(key($arr));
}

function method_3(Array &$arr) {
    return array_keys($arr) === range(0, count($arr) - 1);
}

function method_4(Array &$arr) {
    $idx = 0;
    foreach( $arr as $key => $val ){
        if( $key !== $idx )
            return FALSE;
        $idx++;
    }
    return TRUE;
}




function benchmark(Array $methods, Array &$target){    
    foreach($methods as $method){
        $start = microtime(true);
        for ($i = 0; $i < 1000; $i++)
            $dummy = call_user_func($method, $target);

        $end = microtime(true);
        echo "Time taken with $method = ".round(($end-$start)*1000.0,3)."ms\n";
    }
}



$targets = [
    'Huge array' => range(0, 30000),
    'Small array' => range(0, 1000),
];
$methods = [
    'method_1',
    'method_2',
    'method_3',
    'method_4',
];
foreach($targets as $targetName => $target){
    echo "==== Benchmark using $targetName ====\n";
    benchmark($methods, $target);
    echo "\n";
}

results:

==== Benchmark using Huge array ====
Time taken with method_1 = 5504.632ms
Time taken with method_2 = 4509.445ms
Time taken with method_3 = 8614.883ms
Time taken with method_4 = 2720.934ms

==== Benchmark using Small array ====
Time taken with method_1 = 77.159ms
Time taken with method_2 = 130.03ms
Time taken with method_3 = 160.866ms
Time taken with method_4 = 69.946ms
share|improve this answer

One cheap and dirty way would be to check like this:

isset($myArray[count($myArray) - 1])

...you might get a false positive if your array is like this:

$myArray = array("1" => "apple", "b" => "banana");

A more thorough way might be to check the keys:

function arrayIsAssociative($myArray) {
    foreach (array_keys($myArray) as $ind => $key) {
        if (!is_numeric($key) || (isset($myArray[$ind + 1]) && $myArray[$ind + 1] != $key + 1)) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
// this will only return true if all the keys are numeric AND sequential, which
// is what you get when you define an array like this:
// array("a", "b", "c", "d", "e");

or

function arrayIsAssociative($myArray) {
    $l = count($myArray);
    for ($i = 0; $i < $l, ++$i) {
        if (!isset($myArray[$i])) return true;
    }
    return false;
}
// this will return a false positive on an array like this:
$x = array(1 => "b", 0 => "a", 2 => "c", 4 => "e", 3 => "d");
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the isset method. Yes, it's dirty, but it's the only method that's O(1) instead of O(n). – TinkerTank Jun 24 '12 at 17:47
1  
The thorough arrayIsAssociative() returns true for both array("a", "b", "c") and array("a", "b"=>"b", "c"), but false for both array("a") and array(2=>"a"). – Pang Nov 23 '12 at 1:50

protected by AVD Jun 21 '13 at 9:22

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