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I tried mkdir -p /a/b/c on AIX. When a and b didn't exist, this command created a, b and c. But when a and b both exists, it gives an error

Cannot create /a/b. /a/b: File exists

and returns an error code 2.

Any help on this?

share|improve this question
    
Any help with what? What's the problem? That is the intended output. Besides that, this is not on-topic at Stack Overflow. You should repost it at Unix & Linux and delete the question here. – Danny Beckett Jun 27 '13 at 11:18
    
There is a file in /a/b/c, so you cannot create a dir. Check it with file /a/b/c. – fedorqui Jun 27 '13 at 11:19
1  
Are you quite certain a/b is a directory? If so, this is non-posix-conformant (Each dir operand that names an existing directory shall be ignored without error.) – Kevin Jun 27 '13 at 12:54

I think you are talking about this scenario:

bash-2.02# mkdir -p /a/c/d
bash-2.02# rm -rf /a/c/d
bash-2.02# mkdir -p /a/c/d
mkdir: cannot create /a/c
/a/c: File exists
bash-2.02# echo $?
2
bash-2.02#
share|improve this answer
    
yes, even though "a" and "b" are directories, it says "file exists" and I ran the command "mkdir -p /a/b/c", still the error says " /a/b exists". There is no file with the same name. I think mkdir -p should create every directory in the path(if there is no file with the same name) – user785461 Jun 27 '13 at 11:54
4  
@vik123 How does this answer the question? – Bill Jun 27 '13 at 12:29

I just came across a similar symptom - except that it was a broken remote mountpoint (in this case using sshfs) and had nothing to do with a file being "in the way":

$ mkdir -p /mnt/sshfs-remote
mkdir: cannot create directory `/mnt/sshfs-remote': File exists
$ ls -lscrath /mnt/sshfs-remote
/bin/ls: cannot access /mnt/sshfs-remote: No such file or directory
$ ls -lscrath /mnt
/bin/ls: cannot access /mnt/sshfs-remote: No such file or directory
total 4.0K
    ? d?????????  ? ?    ?        ?            ? sshfs-remote/

A umount* sorted it out. I've also added an exception into the script that triggered the error to also try umount.

$ umount -l /mnt/sshfs-remote ; mount /mnt/sshfs-remote
$ ls -lsahd /mnt/sshfs-remote
4.0K drwxr-xr-x 1 root root 6 Mar 11 09:20 /mnt/sshfs-remote/
$ mkdir -p /mnt/sshfs-remote
$ echo $?
0

*In case someone is wondering about the -l I used on umount: It is probably unnecessary - but on remote mounts I've found it to be a cleaner/easier way to just "get on with it". From the umount man page:

   -l, --lazy
          Lazy unmount.  Detach the filesystem from the file hierarchy now, and clean up all references to this filesystem as soon
          as it is not busy anymore.  (Requires kernel 2.4.11 or later.)
share|improve this answer
    
This works, for me, i had to use umount -f "full path of the dir". It was weird, it won't even display the folder that was mounted when doing ls. – codenamezero Nov 11 '15 at 15:28
$ cd -- "$(mktemp -d)" 
$ mkdir -p a/b/c
$ mkdir -p a/b/c
$ echo $?
0
$ rmdir a/b/c
$ touch a/b/c
$ mkdir -p a/b/c
mkdir: cannot create directory `a/b/c': File exists

In other words, there's already a file there, and you can't have a file and a directory with the same path.

share|improve this answer
    
"a" and "b" are directories, then also it says "file exists" and I ran the command "mkdir -p /a/b/c", still the error says " /a/b exists". There is no file with the same name. I think mkdir -p should create every directory in the path(if there is no file with the same name) – user785461 Jun 27 '13 at 11:56
    
What does mkdir --version print? – l0b0 Jun 27 '13 at 12:01
    
$ mkdir --version mkdir: illegal option -- - Usage: mkdir [-p] [-e] [-m mode] Directory ... $ mkdir -version they both dont work on AIX mkdir: illegal option -- v Usage: mkdir [-p] [-e] [-m mode] Directory ... – user785461 Jun 27 '13 at 13:17
    
I'm afraid if you have a version of mkdir which doesn't even support the POSIX behaviour of -p you're out of luck. Just use a loop to create the directory. – l0b0 Jun 27 '13 at 20:20

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