Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an interesting issue in DB (Oracle version 10g).

There are 2 instances INS1 and INS2. There is a package with 2 procedures in SC1 schema and that is called from SC2 schema with some parameters on both INS1 and INS2 instances.

The first procedure deletes from the global temporary table GTT1, which was created with on commit preserve rows, and then insert into same.

proc1(parameter_in) as
begin
    delete from gtt1;

    insert into gtt1
    from <other_table_1>
    where parameter=parameter_in;
end;

proc2(parameter_in) as
begin
    insert into <table_1>
    select * from gtt1, <other_table_1>
    where <join 2 tables>
    and parameter=parameter_in;

    -- again insert in same table with records not in <other_table_1>
    -- as they were deleted during refresh.

    insert into <table_1>
    select * from gtt1
    where not exists
        (row from <other_table_1>);

    delete from gtt1;            
end;

When these are called from schema SC2 together as:

begin
    sc1.pkg1.proc1(parameter_in);
    sc1.pkg1.proc2(parameter_in);
end;
/

On INS1 it is executing in 10 seconds. On INS2 it is taking 3 minutes.

When I run these procedures separately on INS2 it runs in 5 seconds as:

begin
    sc1.pkg1.proc1(parameter_in);
end;
/

begin
    sc1.pkg1.proc2(parameter_in);
end;
/

I have checked the stat and data in tables <other_table_1> are same on both the instances.

Any suggestions why it is taking time on instance INS2?

share|improve this question
    
Why have you tagged your question as oracle11g if it is about 10g? And why have you tagged it with oracle-apex? –  Frank Schmitt Jun 27 '13 at 13:14
    
Also, please post a minimal complete example - you left out critical information and replaced it with placeholders, and your code doesn't even compile. –  Frank Schmitt Jun 27 '13 at 13:15
    
My idea was just to tell the scenario and not the complete code logic.For example i gave the above scenarios with place holders.Can you help me out with the above information only ? –  user2090701 Jun 27 '13 at 13:17
    
Are the two separate calls in the same session, without a commit in between? Is the GTT populated before you start in any of the scenarios? Is this reproducible, and do all the tables have the same amount of data in each instance? And why are you using a GTT at all instead of just referring the base table directly? –  Alex Poole Jun 27 '13 at 14:46
1  
One issue -- instead of delete, use a truncate. Also, check the execution plans. –  David Aldridge Jun 28 '13 at 6:21

1 Answer 1

My guess is that someone gathered statistics on only one of the temporary tables, which causes a bad plan on only one of your systems.

Statistics can be harmful for temporary tables - since the data is so volatile it is difficult to create representative statistics. This is why Oracle will usually not gather statistics on a temporary table, and will instead use dynamic sampling to estimate the statistics at run time. For example, DBMS_STATS.GATHER_SCHEMA_STATS will not gather statistics for a temporary table. But DBMS_STATS.GATHER_TABLE_STATS will.

If there are no statistics the LAST_ANALYZED timestamp will be null:

select table_name, last_analyzed from dba_tables where table_name = 'GTT1';

If this is the case, delete the statistics and lock the table so that this won't happen again.

begin
    dbms_stats.delete_table_stats(user, 'GTT1');
    dbms_stats.lock_table_stats(user, 'GTT1');
end;
/

Now if someone tries to gather statistics they will get an error message:

begin
    dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(user, 'GTT1');
end;
/

ORA-20005: object statistics are locked (stattype = ALL)
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_STATS", line 23829
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_STATS", line 23880
ORA-06512: at line 2

If your systems rely on dynamic sampling you need to make sure the parameter is enabled and set reasonably. The default, 2, is usually good enough:

select value from v$parameter where name = 'optimizer_dynamic_sampling'

Here's a script demonstrating how explicitly gathering statistics can cause bad cardinality estimates.

Create the tables, populate them with 100K rows. Only gather stats for ONE of the tables:

create global temporary table test_with_stats3(a number) on commit preserve rows;
create global temporary table test_no_stats3(a number) on commit preserve rows;

insert into test_with_stats3 select level from dual connect by level <= 100000;
insert into test_no_stats3 select level from dual connect by level <= 100000;
commit;

begin
    dbms_stats.gather_schema_stats(user);
end;
/

begin
    dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(user, 'TEST_WITH_STATS3');
end;
/

Delete all of the rows. For the table with statistics, Oracle still thinks it has 100K rows:

delete from test_with_stats3;
delete from test_no_stats3;
commit;

explain plan for select * from test_with_stats3;
select * from table(dbms_xplan.display);

Plan hash value: 467959123

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation         | Name             | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT  |                  |   100K|   488K|    44   (3)| 00:00:01 |
|   1 |  TABLE ACCESS FULL| TEST_WITH_STATS3 |   100K|   488K|    44   (3)| 00:00:01 |
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The table without statistics has much more accurate estimates:

explain plan for select * from test_no_stats3;
select * from table(dbms_xplan.display);

Plan hash value: 2315614086

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation         | Name           | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT  |                |     1 |    13 |    43   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   1 |  TABLE ACCESS FULL| TEST_NO_STATS3 |     1 |    13 |    43   (0)| 00:00:01 |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Note
-----
   - dynamic sampling used for this statement (level=2)
share|improve this answer
    
+1: Always worth a go, dynamic sampling. –  David Aldridge Jun 28 '13 at 7:52
    
Thanks for all the comments.However, I tried running schema stats and deleting GTT stats and after running the stats the performance was improved on that day,but after 2 days same issue started happening again.Also, I am using only one GTT and between 2 procs there is no commit in between as these 2 procs are part of package. –  user2090701 Jul 2 '13 at 17:41
    
Also,i checked with replacing delete with truncate in the procs ,but still the performance is not good.My question is if delete is working on one Instance,what will happen changing delete with truncate on other Instance although both Instances are having same data in all tables. ? –  user2090701 Jul 2 '13 at 17:49
    
One more thing, I checked the queries again used in procs and I found that there is use of one where condition frequently in the queries I mentioned above: where trim(column_name) is not null;What I feel is this is making some issues.When I comment the trim part from query the package proc is running very quickly..But again my question is why this is not happening on other Instance though it is working very fast with having trim in the where clause query on other instance??Any expert suggestion/bottlenecks is really appreciated ???? –  user2090701 Jul 2 '13 at 17:49
    
1. You should try to find out why the problem was temporarily fixed and then went away. Is there a scheduled job that gathers stats for specific tables? Check the LAST_ANALYZED column again. If that's not it, look for other processes that might change plans over time. Such as cardinality feedback, or automatic profiles, etc. 2. Truncate should be faster than delete, but it may not make a noticeable difference. You should profile your package to see what part needs to be optimized. 3. Post the relevant explain plans so we can see why they perform differently. –  Jon Heller Jul 2 '13 at 18:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.