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I have two dictionary objects which are very complex and created by converting large xml files into python dictionaries.

I don't know the depth of the dictionaries and just want to compare and want the following output...

e.g. My dictionaries are like this

d1 = {"great grand father":
         {"name":"John",
          "grand father":
             {"name":"Tom",
              "father":
                 {"name":"Andy",
                  "Me":
                     {"name":"Mike",
                      "son": 
                         {"name":"Tom"}
                     }
                 }
             }
         }
     }

d2 is also a similar but could be possible any one of the field is missing or changed as below

d2 = {"great grand father":
         {"name":"John",
          "grand father":
             {"name":"Tom",
              "father":
                 {"name":"Andy",
                  "Me":
                     {"name":"Tonny",
                      "son": 
                         {"name":"Tom"}
                     }
                 }
             }
         }
     }

The dictionary comparison should give me results like this -

Expected Key/Val : Me->name/"Mike" 
Actual Key/Val : Me->name/"Tonny"

If the key "name" does not exists in "Me" in d2, it should give me following output

Expected Key/Val : Me->name/"Mike" 
Actual Key/Val : Me->name/NOT_FOUND

I repeat the dictionary depth could be variable or dynamically generated. The two dictionaries here are given as examples...

All the dictionary comparison questions and their answers which I have seen in SO are related fixed depth Dictionaries.....

share|improve this question
    
There are plenty of syntax errors in your dictionaries. –  interjay Jun 27 '13 at 12:44
1  
depth and level? –  keyser Jun 27 '13 at 12:47
    
The comparison that you want to make is still not clear to me. –  tatsuhirosatou Jun 27 '13 at 12:49
    
@interjay OK... I did the changes and now the syntax errors are removed –  Abhishek Kulkarni Jun 27 '13 at 13:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here I found a way to compare any two dictionaries -

I have tried with various dictionaries of any depths and worked for me. The code is not so modular but just for the reference -

import pprint

pp = pprint.PrettyPrinter(indent=4)

dict1 = { 'Person' : { 'Male' : {'Boys' : {'Roger' : {'age' : 20},
                                           'Rafa' : {'age' : 25}
                                          }
                                },
                       'Female' : { 'Girls' : {'Serena' : {'age' : 23},
                                               'Maria' : {'age' : 15}
                                              }
                                  }

                     },
          'Animal' : { 'Huge' : {'Elephant' : {'color' : 'black' }
                                }
                     }
        }
'''
dict2 = { 'Person' : { 'Male' : {'Boys' : {'Roger' : {'age' : 20}
                                          }
                                },
                       'Female' : { 'Girls' : {'Serena' : {'age' : 23},
                                               'Maria' : {'age' : 1}
                                              }
                                  }
                     }
        }

dict2 = { 'Person' : { 'Male' : {'Boys' : {'Roger' : {'age' : 20},
                                           'Rafa' : {'age' : 2}
                                          }
                                }
                     }
        }
'''

dict2 = { 'Person' : { 'Male' : {'Boys' : {'Roger' : {'age' : 2}}},
                       'Female' : 'Serena'}
        }


key_list = []
err_list = {}
def comp(exp,act):
    for key in exp:
        key_list.append(key)
        exp_val = exp[key]
        try:
            act_val = act[key]
            is_dict_exp = isinstance(exp_val,__builtins__.dict)
            is_dict_act = isinstance(act_val,__builtins__.dict)

            if is_dict_exp == is_dict_act == True:
                comp(exp_val,act_val)
            elif is_dict_exp == is_dict_act == False:
                if not exp_val == act_val:
                    temp = {"Exp" : exp_val,"Act" : act_val}
                    err_key = "-->".join(key_list)
                    if err_list.has_key(key):
                        err_list[err_key].update(temp)
                    else:
                        err_list.update({err_key : temp})
            else:
                temp = {"Exp" : exp_val, "Act" : act_val}
                err_key = "-->".join(key_list)
                if err_list.has_key(key):
                    err_list[err_key].update(temp)
                else:
                    err_list.update({err_key : temp})

        except KeyError:
            temp = {"Exp" : exp_val,"Act" : "NOT_FOUND"}
            err_key = "-->".join(key_list)
            if err_list.has_key(key):
                err_list[err_key].update(temp)
            else:
                err_list.update({err_key : temp})
        key_list.pop()

comp(dict1,dict2)

pp.pprint(err_list)

Here is the output of my code -

{   'Animal': {   'Act': 'NOT_FOUND',
                  'Exp': {   'Huge': {   'Elephant': {   'color': 'black'}}}},
    'Person-->Female': {   'Act': 'Serena',
                           'Exp': {   'Girls': {   'Maria': {   'age': 15},
                                                   'Serena': {   'age': 23}}}},
    'Person-->Male-->Boys-->Rafa': {   'Act': 'NOT_FOUND', 'Exp': {   'age': 25}},
    'Person-->Male-->Boys-->Roger-->age': {   'Act': 2, 'Exp': 20}
}

One can also try with other dictionaries given in commented code..

One more thing - The keys are checked in expected dictionary and the matched with an actual. If we pass dictionaries in alternate order the other way matching is also possible...

comp(dict2,dict1)
share|improve this answer

You're in luck, I did this as part of a project where I worked.

You need a recursive function something like:

def checkDifferences(dict_a,dict_b,differences=[])

You can first check for keys that don't exist in one or the other. e.g

Expected Name/Tom Actual None

Then you compare the types of the values i.e check if the value is a dict or a list etc.

If it is then you can recursively call the function using the value as dict_a/b. When calling recursively pass the differences array.

If the type of the value is a list and the list may have dictionaries within it then you need to covert the list to a dict and call the function on the converted dictionary.

I'm sorry I can't help more but I no longer have access to the source code. Hopefully this is enough to get you started.

share|improve this answer
    
instead of passing the array you can yield results. in python 3.2 you can use yield from for the recursive call, otherwise you need to iterate over it and yield explicitly. –  andrew cooke Jun 27 '13 at 13:05
    
The function I wrote used Python 2.7 but yes yield is a good idea. –  IainS Jun 27 '13 at 13:10
    
@IainS Can you please share your code? –  Abhishek Kulkarni Jun 27 '13 at 13:54
    
As I mentioned at the bottom of my answer, unfortunately I no longer have access to the source code. I just remember the basis of how it worked. –  IainS Jun 27 '13 at 13:55

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