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I will explain the brief coding steps I have done and area where I am facing the problem

main.cpp

int main()
{
    int cnt_map,i=1,value;

   /* My question is about this char pointer "key" */ 
    char *key =(char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * 25);

   if(key!=NULL)
   {
     printf("Key value is not NULL,its value is:%x\n",key) ;
     cout<< "Enter the number of elements required in container map"<<endl;
     cin >> cnt_map;
     for (i=1;i<=cnt_map;i++)
     {
       cout << "Enter the key : ";
       cin >>key;
       cout << "Enter the key value:" ;
       cin >>value;
       printf("value pointed by ptr key: %s, value in ptr: %x\n", key,key);
       c -> add_map1(key,value); //Function inserts value to map container
       key+=sizeof(key);
     }
     c -> size_map1();           //Function displays size of map container
     c -> display_map1();        //Function displays contents of map container
  if(key)
  {
    printf("FINALLY:value pointed by ptr key: %s, value in ptr: %x,size:%d\n",key, key, sizeof(key));
    free(key);
  } 
 }
return 0;
}

when tried compiling and running the above code, I am able to successfully compile the code but got "glibc detected : double free or corruption" when tried running the application.

Now my question is I created a char pointer(char *key =(char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * 25);) and successfully assigned memory to it using malloc. After completing my process when I tried freeing of that char pointer I am getting double free or corruption error. I learned that any variable assigned memory with malloc/calloc should be freed finally. Please tell why I am this getting error, why I should not do this? Please tell me how the memory operations are ongoing on char* key (if possible pictorially).

Note: The code presented above is not the complete code, I just explained where I am getting the problem and if I am not freeing the pointer variable, my application is running successfully.

Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks very much in advance.

share|improve this question
1  
Your code says key1 rather than key - is that just a typo? – RichieHindle Jun 27 '13 at 12:59
    
char *key =(char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * 25); -> char *key = malloc(25); – user529758 Jun 27 '13 at 13:00
2  
That isn't C code. – Jim Balter Jun 27 '13 at 13:04
    
@JimBalter The tag says c++. – Barmar Jun 27 '13 at 13:05
1  
@JimBalter: Yes it is, it just has a couple of lines of C++ sprinkled into it. :-) – RichieHindle Jun 27 '13 at 13:06
up vote 4 down vote accepted

That's because of this line : key+=sizeof(key); . key doen't contain the same address as the malloc returned address.

For example:

char *key =(char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * 25);

Let's say malloc returns the address 20000 (totally dumb address, it's just for the example).

Now you're doing key+=sizeof(key);, so key = 20000 + 4 = 20004. The problem is you're trying to free key, which points to the address 20004 instead of 20000.

In order to fix that, try this:

int main()
{
    int cnt_map,i=1,value;
    char *key_save;

   /* My question is about this char pointer "key" */ 
    char *key =(char*)malloc(sizeof(char) * 25);

    key_save = key;
   if(key!=NULL)
   {
     printf("Key value is not NULL,its value is:%x\n",key) ;
     cout<< "Enter the number of elements required in container map"<<endl;
     cin >> cnt_map;
     for (i=1;i<=cnt_map;i++)
     {
       cout << "Enter the key : ";
       cin >>key;
       cout << "Enter the key value:" ;
       cin >>value;
       printf("value pointed by ptr key: %s, value in ptr: %x\n", key,key);
       c -> add_map1(key,value); //Function inserts value to map container
       key+=sizeof(key);
     }
     c -> size_map1();           //Function displays size of map container
     c -> display_map1();        //Function displays contents of map container
  if(key)
  {
    printf("FINALLY:value pointed by ptr key: %s, value in ptr: %x,size:%d\n",key, key, sizeof(key));
    free(key_save);
  } 
 }
return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Agreed!then what about key address(your case 20004) and its contents,which has also created from the same application? do we really need to free them too?if not why? Please help my understanding! – ybc Jun 27 '13 at 13:12
    
If you free(key) (with the good address), all the memory space allocated to key will be liberated (including the bytes on the address "20004" so) – nouney Jun 27 '13 at 13:15
1  
The "fix" is wrong because incrementing key is wrong ... please see the other answer and comments here. – Jim Balter Jun 27 '13 at 13:15
2  
@JimBalter That's not my problem. The question is : why is there a memory corruption?, I just answer to this point, I'm not here to review all the code. – nouney Jun 27 '13 at 13:20
    
Great! Thank you so much for your explanation and you are right I am also concerned with why is there a memory corruption? @Jim Batter *The "fix" is wrong because incrementing key is wrong ... please see the other answer and comments here. * what do you meant by this finally? Thanks – ybc Jun 27 '13 at 13:23

By doing this:

key+=sizeof(key);

your key variable is no longer pointing to the start of the memory you allocated. You must pass the original pointer to free(). You need to store the original pointer in another variable so that you can correctly free() it at the end.

(You may be able to simply remove that line - I'm not sure what it's doing, given that sizeof(key) is either 4 or 8. I suspect it's redundant.)

share|improve this answer
1  
There doesn't seem to be any reason to increment key in the first place. – Barmar Jun 27 '13 at 13:02
    
Then what about all the allocated memory locations with this key+=sizeof(key);. How to free all the locations? what happen if we don't free those locations? why my application is executing successfully when I am not using free()? – ybc Jun 27 '13 at 13:07
    
@ybc: With each call to malloc you allocate a single block of memory. Regardless of how you use that memory, you only need one corresponding call to free. Your application is working because there's no absolute need to free memory - in your case, the memory is returned to the operating system when the process dies. But if you were running this code in a loop, millions of times, your process would eventually run out of memory. – RichieHindle Jun 27 '13 at 13:10
    
@RichieHindle Exactly!This is what happening..when I re-run the application, I found the memory started allocating in the same previous locations.Thanks for the great analysis.Anyway I require very fewer iterations in my case but, one more question In exactly what kind of situation do we need to free the assigned memory..i guess contrast to the explanation you have provided(if possible an use case). – ybc Jun 27 '13 at 13:16
1  
@ybc: I can't think of a case where failing to call free would cause code to fail, other than by running out of memory. But it's terribly bad practice, and no-one would recommend it. (In your example, you could just use a plain old array, char key[25];, in which case there would be no need to call free at all, just like you don't call free for cnt_map or i. – RichieHindle Jun 27 '13 at 13:28

Simply remove the line:

key+=sizeof(key);

key is not a pointer to an array of strings, it's a pointer to a single string. Every time you increment this, you're reducing the available space in the string. The first time you read a key, there's 25 bytes available. The next time, you've incremented key by 4 or 8 bytes, but the end of the allocated space hasn't changed, so now there's only 21 or 17 bytes available. The third time it's only 17 or 9 bytes, and so on. After a few iterations, you'll increment key past the end of the memory block that you allocated, and it will start writing into unallocated memory (or memory that's assigned to other data structures). This is undefined behavior, and will most likely cause unpredictable failures in your program.

Since you're using C++, you should use std::string instead of char[] for strings, and std::vector instead of ordinary arrays. These data structures automatically expand as needed, so you avoid buffer overflows like this.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks!Great explanation... – ybc Jun 27 '13 at 13:41

this is not taking your code into consideration, but i had a same problem in Reader writer problem (operating systems) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Readers%E2%80%93writers_problem.

It was due to file pointer being global so whenever any reader tried to read and in b/w another read reads and closes file pointer so when another reader which has not finished reading tried to close file pointer after reading. so what happened is file pointer was already closed it wasn't pointing to any file. Solution i used. Instead of declaring file pointer global i declared it local to reader function that it or else you can check file pointer for NULL and if NULL then don't close the file pointer.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<semaphore.h>
#include<pthread.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
sem_t x,wsem;
int rc=0;
char ch;
char str[20];
void *reader(void *);
void *writer(void *);


int main()
{
 int nw,nr,i=0,j=0;
 pthread_t w[10],r[10];
 sem_init(&x,0,1);
 sem_init(&wsem,0,1);
 rc=0;
 printf("Enter the no of readers:");
 scanf("%d",&nr);
 printf("Enter the no of writers");
 scanf("%d",&nw);
 while(i<nw || j<nr) 
 {

  if(i<nw)
  {
pthread_create(&w[i],NULL,writer,(void *)i);

i++;
  }
  if(j<nr)
  {
pthread_create(&r[j],NULL,reader,(void *)j);

    j++;
  }
 }
 for(i=0;i<nw;i++)
 {
pthread_join(w[i],NULL); 
 }
 for(j=0;j<nr;j++)
 {
pthread_join(r[j],NULL);
 }

 return 0;
}

void *reader(void *arg)
{
 FILE *fptr;
 sem_wait(&x);
 rc++;
 if(rc==1)
  sem_wait(&wsem);
 sem_post(&x);

 printf("\nreader %d:",arg);
 fptr=fopen("temp.txt","r+");
 while(fgets(str,10,fptr)!=NULL)
 {
  printf("%s",str);
 }
 printf("\n");
 fclose(fptr);
 sem_wait(&x);
 rc--;
 if(rc==0)
    sem_post(&wsem);
 sem_post(&x);
}


void *writer(void *arg)
{
 FILE *fptr1;
 sem_wait(&wsem);  
 printf("\nwriter-%d:\n",arg);
 fptr1=fopen("temp.txt","a+");
 printf("enter the string:");
 scanf("%s",str);
 fputs(str,fptr1);
 fclose(fptr1);  
 sem_post(&wsem);
}
share|improve this answer

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