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I am using Entity Framework 5.0.0.0 in a .net 4.5 console application and I have to access a database with two tables in it with a foreign key relationship between them like so:

overview

The odd thing about it is that the foreign key is between B(Almost1, Almost2) and A(Almost1, Almost2) not from B(AId) to A(AId). This is allowed by SQL server as Almost1 and Almost2 combined are unique and neither are nullable (on table A at least - on B they are as it is an optional relationship but that is by the by).

Here's some SQL for creating this situation:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[A](
    [AId] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [Almost1] [int] NOT NULL,
    [Almost2] [int] NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_A] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [AId] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY],
 CONSTRAINT [A_Constraint] UNIQUE NONCLUSTERED 
(
    [Almost1] ASC,
    [Almost2] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[B](
    [BId] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [Almost1] [int] NULL,
    [Almost2] [int] NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_B] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [BId] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[B] ADD  CONSTRAINT [FK_A_B] FOREIGN KEY([Almost1], [Almost2])
REFERENCES [dbo].[A] ([Almost1], [Almost2])

The thing is, it seems that it is not allowed by Entity Framework - is this the case or am I just not defining my model correctly?

Here is my c#:

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public MyContext(string connectionString) : base(connectionString)
    {
        MyAs = Set<A>();
        MyBs = Set<B>();
    }

    public DbSet<A> MyAs { get; private set; }
    public DbSet<B> MyBs { get; private set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        var aEntity = modelBuilder.Entity<A>();
        aEntity.ToTable("A");
        aEntity.HasKey(a => a.AId);

        var bEntity = modelBuilder.Entity<B>();
        bEntity.ToTable("B");
        bEntity.HasKey(a => a.BId);
        bEntity
            .HasOptional(b => b.A)
            .WithMany(a => a.Bs)
            .Map(m => m.MapKey("Almost1", "Almost2"));
    }
}

public class A
{
    public int AId { get; set; }
    public int Almost1 { get; set; }
    public int Almost2 { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<B> Bs { get; private set; }
    public void AddB(B b)
    {
        if (b == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("b");
        if (Bs == null) Bs = new List<B>();
        if (!Bs.Contains(b)) Bs.Add(b);
        b.A = this;
    }
}

public class B
{
    public int BId { get; set; }
    public virtual A A { get; set; }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        using (var ctx = new MyContext(@"connection string"))
        {
            ctx.MyAs.Add(new A { Almost1 = 1, Almost2 = 1 });
            ctx.SaveChanges();
        }
    }
}

It throws an InvalidOperationException saying:

The specified association foreign key columns 'Almost1, Almost2' are invalid. The number of columns specified must match the number of primary key columns.

If I ignore the AId column and instead make Almost1 and Almost2 a composite primary key, so my OnModelCreating method now looks like this:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    var aEntity = modelBuilder.Entity<A>();
    aEntity.ToTable("A");
    aEntity.HasKey(a => new { a.Almost1, a.Almost2 });
    aEntity.Ignore(a => a.AId);

    var bEntity = modelBuilder.Entity<B>();
    bEntity.ToTable("B");
    bEntity.HasKey(a => a.BId);
    bEntity
        .HasOptional(b => b.A)
        .WithMany(a => a.Bs)
        .Map(m => m.MapKey("Almost1", "Almost2"));
}

It works, but I don't really want to do this as there is also a table (let's call it C) that relates to A in the traditional way by having an AId column and the foreign key is going from C.AId to A.AId.

Yeah, it's a bit weird I know - but is it possible to deal with this in Entity Framework?

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1  
Entity Framework doesn't support unique keys, and without those, it cannot model your foreign key, unfortunately. –  hvd Jun 27 '13 at 13:13
    
@hvd :-( OK, thanks –  kmp Jun 27 '13 at 13:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As mentioned, since EF doesn't support unique keys and other SQL objects. I ended up creating some scripts as embedded resources and have them execute as part of the seed process of the drop/create initializer.

Not sure if this will allow you to navigate between the objects in code, but it works pretty nicely to have the database get updated in one process.

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