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Thanks to everyone who has replied.
I think I have to tweak my first question a little bit. I'm a little bit confusing because of the definition of $ sign. It just asserts that there are between 6 and 10 word chars at the very end of the string.
That's it! Right? Then, It has to be matched with my test string "123a56A781231231231241" in my opinion. Because it doesn't break the rule! 6-10 word chars at the very beginning of string, and at the very end of string. Perfect, isn't it?

Plus, I want to know the difference between ^(?=\w{6,10}$) and ^(?=\w{6,10})$.

One more, Casimir et Hippolyte you said The + doesn't change anything, this means only that the quantifier ( {6,10} here) is possessive and doesn't allow backtracks. Is that means + sign makes $ sign disable?

Thank you guys in advance.

Before I go any further, I want you guys to know that it's been only 2 days since I started to study about regex. I'm totally newbie.

First. ^(?=\w{6,10}$) This is pattern. Why the dollar signal has to be inside of () ? I know it's a dumb question but I'm curious. I tried to locate the dollar sign at the outside of (). But it didn't work as I expected.

Second. I found several tutorial site and it says the dollar sign means

"$ may appear at the end of a pattern to require the match to occur at the very end of a line. For example, abc$ matches 123abc but not abc123."

So $ is used to assert that the matched part of string is at the very end of a line. Right?

If that is true, why this pattern : "^(?=\w{6,10}$)" can't be matched with my test string : "123a56A781231231231241".

As you see, my test string contains 6~10 word characters at the very beginning of a line and 6~10 word characters at the very end of a line.

Third. As I mention earlier, this pattern : ^(?=\w{6,10}$) can't be matched with my test string : "123a56A781231231231241" But! if I add + sign behind of \w{6,10} like ^(?=\w{6,10}+$) it works. Is it because + sign is possessive? I mean,as far as I know, + sign tells the engine not to backtrack once a match has been made. So I hazard the guess, the $ sign doesn't do his job as it doesn't even do backtracking(I'm not sure about this,of course,as I don't know how the $ sign works behind). Is it right?

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it didn't work as I expected. What does that mean? What did it do vs what did you expect it to do? –  Mathletics Jun 27 '13 at 14:04
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You should check this site out: debuggex.com It allows you to visualize what is happening with your expressions. Very cool site. –  moderndegree Jun 27 '13 at 14:04
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I tested with perl and ^(?=\w{6,10}+$) doesn't work with the string 123a56A781231231231241 (which makes sense since + is possessive) –  doubleDown Jun 27 '13 at 14:36
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Any reason you use (?=...)? It's 20 years since I use regexes, and I rarely found the need for lookaheads. So, I doubt that you really need it after just 2 days. –  Ingo Jun 27 '13 at 14:39
    
I've never said that I have to use (?--...). Like I said I'm just trying to learn these things so I asked about it. –  user2528192 Jun 27 '13 at 15:34
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The (?=..) is a lookahead, it's a zero-width assertion, this means that it is just a check and matches nothing. In other word a lookahead means followed by.

The pattern ^(?=\w{6,10}$) means:

begining of the string followed by between 6 and 10 word characters until the end of the string.

Note that there isn't any character matched since all is inside a lookahead exêct the ^ that is zero-width too.

A match function can only return an empty string as match result, but will return true if the condition is met (otherwhise false)

The + doesn't change anything, this means only that the quantifier ( {6,10} here) is possessive and doesn't allow backtracks. More informations about this feature here: www.regular-expressions.info/possessive.html

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Thanks for your replying. I've got a question,though. You said The + doesn't change anything, this means only that the quantifier ( {6,10} here) is possessive and doesn't allow backtracks. Is that means + sign makes $ sign disable? –  user2528192 Jun 27 '13 at 15:38
    
@user2528192: no it doesn't, the + after an other quantifier made it possessive, that only means that the regex can't backtrack into the group of character (\w here) when it fails. It is not very important here. See the link for more informations. –  Casimir et Hippolyte Jun 27 '13 at 15:47
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If that's your whole regex, you don't need a look-ahead. ie these two regexes are equivalent:

^(?=\w{6,10}$)
^\w{6,10}$

Why the $ needs to be inside the bracket? That's because the (anchored) look ahead ^(?=\w{6,10}) just asserts that there are between 6 and 10 word chars at the front of the input. But it will succeed if there's more than 6-10 word chars at the front of the input.

By putting the $ inside the look ahead, it will only succeed if there are 6-10 word chars in the whole input.

You would only use a look ahead if you also wanted to have another restriction. For example, to match

6-10 word chars, and "a" appears before "b"

you would use the regex:

^(?=\w{6,10}$).*a.*b
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  1. I can't help you with this because I don't know what you mean. Are you trying to match against the test string in 2 and 3?

  2. ^(?=\w{6,10}$) is trying to match the beginning of the string, followed by 6-10 word characters and the end of the string. Your string is longer than 10 characters, so that won't match.

  3. When you add the + it matches one or more instances of the 6-10 character string.

    Adding the + should still not match, because either way you are looking to match a string exactly 6-10 chars long, but your test string is longer. Making it possessive won't change the match in this instance.

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+ doesn't means "one or more instances" here. It's a possessive quantifier. More informations here: regular-expressions.info/possessive.html –  Casimir et Hippolyte Jun 27 '13 at 14:30
    
@CasimiretHippolyte cool, I did not know about that. I've updated my answer. –  Mathletics Jun 27 '13 at 15:26
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